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Google Offers Olive Branch To Newspapers
engine

WebmasterWorld Administrator engine us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month Best Post Of The Month



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 3:15 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

After upending their business models and virtually threatening to run them into bankruptcy, Google now wants to cozy up to newspapers and take the place of their ad reps. The search leviathan is setting up an online marketplace that will allow customers to bid for advertising space in 50 U.S. newspapers.

The three-month test version of Google Print Ads starts this week and participating papers include the New York Times, Washington Post, and The Boston Globe. Around 100 advertisers, including the Netflix movie rental concern, luggage vendor eBags, and insurance broker eHealth, have already started buying ads through the new system.

Google Offers Olive Branch To Newspapers [forbes.com]

 

jtara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jtara us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 3:33 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Print ad buyers won't stand for the treatment they will get from Google.

This is a closed test for a select few (100) clients, though.

Google should be up for an Oscar for this one. ;)

[edited by: jtara at 3:44 pm (utc) on Nov. 6, 2006]

Quadrille

WebmasterWorld Senior Member quadrille us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 3:43 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Is this the system that was announced a few months ago? It's now launching? Or is this another one?

It will be very interesting to see if it works; one thing that has absolutely fascinated me for a while, is the total failure of all the non-web ad agencies to get a foot in the door of the Internet.

No evidence that they've even tried, so far as I can see from the UK, where a few multinationals have dominated posters, print and even TV ads.

And now Google is moving into their turf ...

jtara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jtara us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 3:59 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

It isn't "launching". It is a limited test.

The last test was with technology magazines. And we haven't heard a peep about how it went.

[news.com.com...]

The previous test was pretty goofy - a page of ads grouped together with "ads by Google" at the top, and a URL leading to an online version of the page.

This seems to be a test of more conventional ads.

The newspapers get to set the minimum price, and gets to decide who gets to bid.

Who knows - it might work, as it's more of an eBay model presumably with direct communication between buyer and seller - subtracting Google from customer service - which they are terrible at.

This points out why, IMO, traditional ad agencies haven't gotten involved with Adwords. Imagine an ad agency being at the mercy of Google, which could arbitrarily ban them at any time without giving a reason. Or could have ad prices double or quadruple over night. How can you base a stable business on that?

Certainly, there are those that do base a business on Adwords - and do very well indeed. But it's a high-risk business. Not at all what ad agencies are used to. And, ultimately, not a stable business model for anybody.

Except Google. ;)

weeks

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 4:15 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

jtara is right on the money. This is mostly great publicity for Google's ad system. But, there is a need here.

Last week I saw a presentation on local search by Google and several others to newspaper executives. The newspaper pros offered up this very complex view of the market and how to address it. G came in and simply said what they saw as needed was:

1. Education and awareness (This is the big cost in getting ads, as many of you here have learned.)

2. Simplicity (Most businesses have dozens of options for reaching their customers. And they are in the widget biz, not the communications biz.)

3. Track return on investment in the ad (Well, duh. But, this is where print fails often in working with those who are buying ads. They want to "brand." I'm not certain that newspapers are the most cost effective way to brand in most markets.)

If you carefully read the articles about this (and it is all I have done this morning), the newspapers are now seeing this as a way to sell "left-over" space.

Addressing 1 and 2, I have seriously been looking as trying to pull together locally what G has suggested they want to do eventually--be a database of information on ad channels in a market. (Seniors in this zip code, teens in high-income households, women within these ages, etc.) Google is looking to do the same, offering the potential for #3 as well.

Hollywood

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 5:18 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

I participated in this print advertising test, it was somewhat raw, the way in which it was run, I submitted a bid for Infoworld magazine... My add was printed in Inforworld magazine... Only issues I had ---> I did not know the add was only for a weekly advertisement, I thought it was for a month add. I think this was not communicated to me correctly, but I made my money back at least (At most).

Using Google to get adds into print is a good idea and should increase revenue for Google.

Plusses to this as a web owner

1) Get adds all from one main login/center (Google login) into magazines, web, radio, etc.
2) Control a clients budget on advertising all from one easy platform.
3) Bid on placement as opposed to fighting on the phone with sales reps.
4) Faster as no phone calls needed to place to add reps.
5) Faster as choose online faster and navigate through potential spots with ease.

Hollywood

[edited by: Hollywood at 5:19 pm (utc) on Nov. 6, 2006]

idolw

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:06 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Plusses to this as a web owner

1) Get adds all from one main login/center (Google login) into magazines, web, radio, etc.
2) Control a clients budget on advertising all from one easy platform.
3) Bid on placement as opposed to fighting on the phone with sales reps.
4) Faster as no phone calls needed to place to add reps.
5) Faster as choose online faster and navigate through potential spots with ease.

Drawbacks:
1) die forgotten if banned by G. even if banned by mistake.

rohitj

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:10 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Somehow I get the feeling that the hundred or so organizations on that list, don't have getting "banned" from google as a concern.

Prove me wrong -- point to an advertising network dumb enough to ban some of the largest newspapers in the world.

jtara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jtara us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:29 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Somehow I get the feeling that the hundred or so organizations on that list, don't have getting "banned" from google as a concern.

And that's why this publicity exercise is just a dog and pony show.

Quadrille

WebmasterWorld Senior Member quadrille us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:47 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

And that's why this publicity exercise is just a dog and pony show.

Care to have an online bet on that? ;)

It's about money. Potentially Very Big Money. It's business.

Google would not have been stupid enough to sign up a company that looked as if a penalty was on the cards.

But you can bet both sides will have opt-out clauses.

jtara

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jtara us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 7:03 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

What I am saying is, don't put too much creedence in the results of this "test".

The real test will be when/if they roll this out to the masses.

Google will have to have a 180 degree turn in how they treat their customers for this to be a success.

Perhaps that will occur, though, and we will all be happier for it.

Clark

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 7:18 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

This is wonderful. No need for ad reps anymore. Outsource another 100 jobs into 3 google employees in India.

weeks

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 7:51 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Hollywood, that was very, very interesting. That backs up my experience.

Clark, I appreciate your humor, but what the industry is hoping is these small ads will draw these ad buyers in for larger buys. It will be a source of "who's interested" for the ad reps.

Getting the smaller firms to look at daily or weekly newspapers is a major problem in the print business right now.

Google is hoping that this will be a major way to sell space.

The difference between most web publishers on the WW board and the newspapers is the web publishers are (wisely, in many cases) not interested in aggressively selling ads. Subscription and Google with some affiliates thrown in are enough. And, then maybe talking to a few major players in the biz, and that's that. (Hmmmm. Now that I think about, newspapers have been taking the same approach. Nevermind.)

justablink

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 8:08 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

A middle man is still a middle man, and I don't see Google positioning themselves as an ad agency for print for the masses. Brand name advertisers with big budgets that can do both print and web are doing both already. If it can save time and money to do both this way, then it will be a winner.

The reason we use G and the Internet for advertising is the ability to find someone right now in the buying cycle for our product/service and a very reasonable cost. Print has a shelf life, where newspaper shelf life is the shortest. Print casts a wide net that's not very well targeted, hence the cost is prohibitive for the masses to do both effectively.

I wish the 100 beta testers of this good luck; hopefully those that see the print ad you just paid for through G don't also go searching on the Internet and click your ad there too!

idolw

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 10:00 pm on Nov 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Somehow I get the feeling that the hundred or so organizations on that list, don't have getting "banned" from google as a concern.

Prove me wrong -- point to an advertising network dumb enough to ban some of the largest newspapers in the world.

i meant advertisers running into trouble.
how do you feel about changing your logo colours in order to get higher quality score? :)

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:37 am on Nov 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Can't wait for this to be rolled out across the UK.

weeks

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 3:17 pm on Nov 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Justablink, I think Google is doing just that--positioning themselves as a middle man. And, while that sounds like a bad thing, from what I know of the industry, it is not. The Wall Street Journal today has good short article which offers some context.

The newspaper industry is finally confronting its Achilles' heel: It is too hard for small advertisers to buy ads.

Newspapers have long catered to their biggest local advertisers -- such as department stores -- for the bulk of their revenues. But department stores have cut their spending as they have consolidated, just as other large advertisers have migrated to the Internet and other media

Non-subscribers can read it here. [online.wsj.com]

eZeB

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3147411 posted 6:00 pm on Nov 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Google is not the first to try this and I think it is part of a larger trend in advertising -- ebay-ification. Lots of Ad agencies are hopping mad -- most of the people saying it is 'unworkable' or 'unrealistic' are the ones getting hit in the vested interest.

Can't see how it is a bad thing myself -- or that anyone can really stop it for that matter.

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