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RSS, ATOM, and Related Technologies Forum

    
The best and worst ideas or implementations of RSS feeds
What are examples of the best use, worst use, dumbest, ugliest, cleverest
Webwork




msg:1543043
 8:59 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm just a beginner. Save me some grief.

Do you know of examples where RSS technology was used 1) to its greatest benefit, and 2) to its worst detriment?

Are there 'stupid uses', wasteful efforts?

Are there good or even creatively brilliant implementations? Cunning implementations?

What distinguishes one from the other?

When should one use it and when should one smack one's self on the head for using it?

Have you ever seen it used in a way that hurt a website? Likewise, have you seen it used in a way that made a significant improvement?

 

eurotrash




msg:1543044
 9:20 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

You'll have to wait until the book comes out. You want all this info for nothing? Cheeky bugger! :-)

Over the next couple of days I will think about it and answer at least some of the questions from my opinion.

Webwork




msg:1543045
 9:35 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

Thus the lively exchange that began - once upon a time during a shared limo ride in LasVega - continues . . .(Oh, don't stop the abuse! I do find it endearing in all the the usual strange ways. ;-)

Good to hear from you E.T.

ET phone home!

werty




msg:1543046
 9:58 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

Interesting topic WebWork

I would like to remind members to please not drop urls or companies in this thread but just describe the services.

One of the cooler RSS things I have seen is the whole PodCasting trend. I am still slighly confused how this works, but it is like a TV for internet radio broadcasts, allowing you to save them to your harddrive for later use.

Some other cool things would be daily hints, coupons or recipes. Good for the user as well as the website.

I would love to hear some bad examples...

Webwork




msg:1543047
 10:40 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

I would be happy if anyone cared to drop examples by sticky as part of this dialogue.

moltar




msg:1543048
 10:50 pm on Dec 8, 2004 (gmt 0)

A bad example would be setting up a site that consists solely of RSS feeds with a hope to earn $ from aff and/or adsense.

bill




msg:1543049
 4:57 am on Dec 9, 2004 (gmt 0)

The best examples of the current technology I find come from valid feeds that display the entire post/article so that I don't need to visit the site. I'd rather read the whole thing in my aggregator. A setup of MovableType 3.121 has new default templates for RSS and Atom feeds which give you the full feed (and images).

I was one of the first 300 people to put an RDF feed on my site back when the old Netscape portal introduced the format. Looking back at some of my old feeds I can say that the old format, while useful in its time, was so limited in the amount of information you could include that it pales in comparison to the XML/Atom feeds we can pump out today. People that emulate this old format which consists of little more than a title, link and 15 word blurb, I feel are poorly implementing this technology.

dcheney




msg:1543050
 5:58 pm on Dec 9, 2004 (gmt 0)

For my major site, I use the RSS feed to highlight recent changes. The information in the RSS feed is not actually replicated on a single page on the site itself - but rather the new data is integrated into the existing pages. Thus the person reading the RSS feed gets a quick heads up as to what's new and can then dig into the details if they so desire.

Reflection




msg:1543051
 6:17 pm on Dec 9, 2004 (gmt 0)

People that emulate this old format which consists of little more than a title, link and 15 word blurb, I feel are poorly implementing this technology

But what's the point of implementing the technology if your readers never visit your site and thus never generate any revenue?

Rosalind




msg:1543052
 2:37 am on Dec 17, 2004 (gmt 0)

The best examples of the current technology I find come from valid feeds that display the entire post/article so that I don't need to visit the site. I'd rather read the whole thing in my aggregator. A setup of MovableType 3.121 has new default templates for RSS and Atom feeds which give you the full feed (and images).

I don't quite see the point of that. Granted, blog posts tend to be a little shorter than normal articles. But I thought the point was to give a taster, and if you have the whole post you end up scrolling through a ton of text that may not be what you wanted to read today. If all your feeds are like that, it's a lot of scrolling.

My own view on the worst thing you can do is simply to have a broken feed. If it doesn't do its job, what's the point?

bill




msg:1543053
 9:19 am on Dec 17, 2004 (gmt 0)

I don't quite see the point of that.
I currently track a few thousand feeds. I hardly ever visit the actual page of any except a few of them. One of the main reasons I prefer the entire content is that in my aggregator I can setup watches for certain keywords. If there's only a short blurb provided then unless those keywords are in the title or the blurb I'm not going to find it. I then probably won't open that post, and I certainly won't visit the webpage. I find myself unsubscribing to a lot of feeds now if they don't provide full contents in their feeds.
Reflection




msg:1543054
 7:10 pm on Dec 17, 2004 (gmt 0)

I hardly ever visit the actual page of any except a few of them.... I find myself unsubscribing to a lot of feeds now if they don't provide full contents in their feeds.

What does it matter to the 'feeder' if you never visit their website anyway?

justguy




msg:1543055
 10:43 am on Dec 23, 2004 (gmt 0)

I have to admit, the idea of me sending all my content to people who then do not visit the site, read ads or buy stuff is a bit odd to put it mildly.

Now, full RSS content feed for my paid subscriber base - oh yes. And will be something I introduce in 2005.

Also will write our own, branded RSS reader that has features unique to our sites/content whilst also allowing any other, competitor, RSS feed to be read. Indeed, we will bundle the reader with a list of other feeds.

Quinton




msg:1543056
 10:45 pm on Dec 23, 2004 (gmt 0)

We have just made an rss reader that is totally customisable by any site so if any of you would like a customised rss reader which is a far better option than email marketing these days for your site just let me know, you can find the email in the profile.

It can display your feed (which cannot be deleted)and other offers you may have and also people can add their own feeds.
It will show your website address at the top of the reader and display all formats of feeds including atom.

I know this looks like my frst post here but i have been here for a while now just didnt post, used to have the user name uksitesubmit :)
[webmasterworld.com...] one of my first posts 4 years ago, those where the days!

ScottM




msg:1543057
 12:10 am on Dec 24, 2004 (gmt 0)

I agree with Werty.

Podcasting is huge. When we first started it, Google would return, "Did you mean Broadcasting?

It was that way until about 2 weeks ago. Now there are 752,000 results.

There was a stern warning I overheard from a large player in the traditional radio market and they are scared to death of this.

Good.

:>)

bill




msg:1543058
 6:33 am on Dec 24, 2004 (gmt 0)

The RSS enclosures that allow for Podcasting are expanding this medium in ways that I find fascinating. Just yesterday I was reading about Skypecasting...although it's now known as Podcasting today, I'd bet that we're going to see a lot more -casting types of uses for enclosures in the coming year.

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