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This 32 message thread spans 2 pages: 32 ( [1] 2 > >     
Worst book youve ever read
and wondered why you bothered.
Essex_boy




msg:314644
 10:59 pm on Sep 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

Has to be Where they lay.

Its about teh recovery of US service lost in battle with a primary emphasis on Vietnam and Laos.

Man, they never found one body and relates to the search in painful detail - steer clear.

One mildly amusing passage - they were looking for a downed Huey pilot and found a US issue helmet with a bullet hole right through it, convinced they were on the right tracks, as no one would have survived that, they combed the area for a week.

Once back in the states (after spending a fortune) they spoke to the door gunner about the events of that day - He said 'dang I had to leave behind a lucky helmet it had a bullet hole right through it.'

A true waste of paper.

 

hannamyluv




msg:314645
 12:57 am on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

"The never ending story" (yes, the one the movies were based on.) I read it while a teen and I just remember thinking that the story really was never ending. The movies were based off about a 10th of the book, if that and the writer really should have stopped there. I never did finish the book.

digitalghost




msg:314646
 2:16 am on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

Remembrance of Things Past by Marcel Proust. I kept reading, and reading, wondering when I would get to the part that made someone decide to call it a classic. Some 3000 pages in all. Flashes of brilliance overwhelmed by cynicism and pedantry.

graywolf




msg:314647
 4:20 am on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

Moby Dick by Herman Mellville or Turn of the Screw by Henry James, could they possibly have taken any longer to get on with things.

martinibuster




msg:314648
 5:40 am on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

"And the Ass Saw the Angel" by Nick Cave. An Australian's version of American Southern Gothic. People kept telling me it was a masterpiece but it was difficult for me to get past the highly stylized writing.

"There were some homes that took in Madness as a tenant. It was on one wet and eldritch eve that Rebecca Swift, Sardus' young but abstracted wife, heard a knocking in her head - too loud this time to ignore - and with trembling heart and tiny, trembling hands, drew back the big, black bolt a crack, and let the tenant in..."

Here's a bit from the first page:

It was his brother who tore the caul on that, the morning of their birth, as if that sole act of assertion was to set an inverted precedent for inertia in his life to come, Euchrid, then unnamed, clutched ahold of his brother's heels and slopped into the world with all the glory of an uninvited guest.

It has a rhythm that's intriguing, and it must be from his background as a musician. But the writing reads like song lyrics. It reads like an exagerrated mock-Edgar Allen Poe. It just didn't feel right. I couldn't take it seriously.

Must have been phrases like "wet and eldritch eve" and names like "Euchrid" that made me gag, literally gag.

But what do I know? Maybe a hundred years from now it will be regarded as a masterpiece.

AAnnAArchy




msg:314649
 6:51 am on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

The Confessions of Max Tivoli - at least that's the one that comes to mind right off the bat. It got some great reviews. I'd use it for kindling.

encyclo




msg:314650
 4:18 pm on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

There's always the Da Vinci Code - total drivel from the beginning to about page 25 when I gave up completely. How it became a best-seller I have no idea.

Proust is better in the original French, but I have never managed to get past more than a couple of chapters.

Sarah Atkinson




msg:314651
 4:25 pm on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

Gereld's Game by Stephen King (And I'm a big King fan)

Tale of Two Cities

Romeo and Juiliet (I like Shakespear but this has to be his worst and I also think it is terrible for 9th graders to read.)

digitalghost




msg:314652
 4:29 pm on Sep 27, 2005 (gmt 0)

>>Da Vinci Code

The story doesn't begin until you get a bit past page 25. ;) The problem I had with the Da Vinci Code is that Langdon goes on about the 'apple', and being a Harvard symbologist, he should've known that the Bible doesn't mention an 'apple', but a forbidden fruit.

Normal Mailer's Ancient Evenings is another novel that comes to mind since we're discussing bad novels...

vik_c




msg:314653
 1:29 pm on Sep 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

'The Chamber' by John Grisham...rather depressing book..with a couple of infants being killed in a terrorist attack and the death row talk all through.

hooloovoo22




msg:314654
 3:50 pm on Sep 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

I'm sure many would disagree, but The Crying of Lot 49 by Pynchon. Page-long sentences were just too much for my feeble mind.

I used to not give up on a book, but the queue has become so long I don't have that problem anymore.

Sarah Atkinson




msg:314655
 4:27 pm on Sep 28, 2005 (gmt 0)

I rember in Hearts in Atlantis by Stephen King (a very good book btw) he says you should give a book 20% before putting it down. if after 20% you still having goten into the book then don't feel bad aboult letting it go. you gave it a chance. however you should at lease give a book 20%.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:314656
 10:25 am on Sep 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

There's no accounting for taste. I just came back from holiday and when I was away I read five books. The Da Vinci code was one of them and I thought it was highly entertaining.

You have to remember not to let the truth get in the way of a good story. Having said that, my curiosity led me to do some googling into the organisations mentioned in the Da Vinci Code and I reckon that their responses to the book's claims are less than convincing. While this is a work of fiction it clearly touched a nerve and it did include many facts. I have yet to hear of Dan Brown being being taken to court over anything he said. That tells it's own story.

Syzygy




msg:314657
 2:47 pm on Sep 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

Communion - Whitley Streiber! What absolute drivel.

Da Vinci Code. I recommend Mr Brown's 'inspiration sources' - Holy Blood & the Holy Grail, and The Templar Revelation.

Syzygy

Sarah Atkinson




msg:314658
 2:53 pm on Sep 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

[
There's no accounting for taste. I just came back from holiday and when I was away I read five books. The Da Vinci code was one of them and I thought it was highly entertaining.

You have to remember not to let the truth get in the way of a good story. Having said that, my curiosity led me to do some googling into the organisations mentioned in the Da Vinci Code and I reckon that their responses to the book's claims are less than convincing. While this is a work of fiction it clearly touched a nerve and it did include many facts. I have yet to hear of Dan Brown being being taken to court over anything he said. That tells it's own story.

I watched a show "unlocking the devenci code" i think is what it was called. and talked aboult were truth and fiction converged in the book. I don't think the author ever realy ment for it to be taken as truth. I love clive cusler books and he offten blends real facts to make his fiction seem more real. After all that's what authors do. Even a lot of the scifi has something to it that makes it seem buyable. Plusible imposibilities.

digitalghost




msg:314659
 6:48 pm on Sep 30, 2005 (gmt 0)

I enjoyed the Da Vinci Code, just didn't like the bit about the apple. Angels and Demons was entertaining too.

A tiny mistake doesn't kill an entire novel. I enjoyed Robinson Crusoe even though Crusoe swims naked to a shipwreck, then stuffs biscuits into his pockets.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:314660
 10:03 am on Oct 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

Maybe it was pockets of flesh :o)

Essex_boy




msg:314661
 11:40 am on Oct 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

Or he stored them in his cheeks.....Hamster like

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:314662
 1:29 pm on Oct 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

... or his other cheeks ;o)

weeks




msg:314663
 11:15 pm on Oct 4, 2005 (gmt 0)

Harvests of Joy: How the Good Life Became Great Business
by Robert Mondavi

I was researching the wine industry and this came highly recommended. Uh, no. Great promise. He was in his mid-50s when he started his business. But, no real insights here, except that he dumped his wife who stood by him during all of the bad times when he finally became successful. Jerk.

Essex_boy




msg:314664
 1:30 pm on Oct 5, 2005 (gmt 0)

... or his other cheeks - Thats what I was hinting at!

supermanjnk




msg:314665
 3:13 pm on Oct 6, 2005 (gmt 0)

I had to read animal farm for english once, I absolutly hated that book

weeks




msg:314666
 1:30 pm on Oct 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Animal Farm is not great literature, but it's part of the culture. I enjoyed it. You have to have read it to be educated.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:314667
 6:56 pm on Oct 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Actually Animal Farm and 1984 by George Orwell are undoubtedly great literature. That is why they are taught in schools.

Essex_boy




msg:314668
 10:22 pm on Oct 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Funny you should say that, I bought a copy sevral years ago and only read half of it.

Odd thing is I thought it was a good and would recommend it but couldnt bring myself to read the whole of it.

Very strange.

weeks




msg:314669
 11:33 pm on Oct 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

E-boy, are you talking about 1984 or Animal Farm?
I wonder how 1984 would read today for the first time. I read it in 1969. How it reads today with today's audiences where much of the technology described is possible would be interesting to hear. Do we fear Big Brother?

Hawkgirl




msg:314670
 8:00 am on Oct 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

> I'm sure many would disagree, but The Crying of Lot 49 by Pynchon. Page-long sentences were just too much for my feeble mind.

I bailed on that one myself. In fact, when I saw the title of this thread, that book lept to my mind. :) Glad I'm not the only one.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:314671
 8:58 am on Oct 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

As I said earlier, I was on holiday in Crete recently and I read five books. On my final day I went to the reception area in the apartment block to chose another from the free selection. I saw American Psycho by Brett Ellis and having heard of the book and film I thought that I would have a go at it ... terrible.

This was an absolute load of drivel. How it ever got to be a best seller I'll never know. After reading about 35 pages I thought this has got to improve so I leafed forward a bit and read another couple of pages up front ... still drivel, so I gave up.

hannamyluv




msg:314672
 12:45 pm on Oct 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

American Psycho by Brett Ellis

My problem with that book was that it was skewed to the unrealistic side. Some of the murders that he committed would not have resulted in a blah sort of reaction depicted in the book (the police murder for example). Then again, my friend and I had a long debate about whether he actually committed the murders or just made them up in his head.

Why it was a best seller? Simple. Sex, Blood and Violence.

lawman




msg:314673
 2:41 pm on Oct 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

On various days, I've had to remove posts relating to some religion's holy scriptures.

Please, per Foo Charter, no commentary on anyone's religion or their scriptures.

All previous rebukes have been via sticky mail. I'm posting this in public hoping it will be more effective.

lawman

This 32 message thread spans 2 pages: 32 ( [1] 2 > >
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