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My son is 19 (entering 2d year of college), my daughter 17 (Sr. H.S.)
Someone please explain their generational state of mind to me
Webwork




msg:319231
 10:46 pm on Jul 18, 2005 (gmt 0)

What am I missing?

Is the mind set today any different than it's ever been?

- My parents just don't get it!
- I don't want to be like my parents!
- Old people lead @%##ed up lives!

What do young folk yearn for and what do they fear?

Is this a generation of hope, fear or what?

Is work synonymous with one's life being over?

Is there any more drift now than ever? "I don't know what I want to do." If I hear one more kid talk about being a forensice scientist . . . (There will be 1 million job applicants for 230 jobs.) 3 out of 7 kids wants to work on T.V. or in "broadcasting".

Is it the trend for young men to decorate their rooms by dropping clothing bombs? (My god - the piles and chaos. My father would have set my room on fire. No kidding.)

Someone explain the current age group 16 - 24 or so.

Those that are now 25 - bug off! You're now OLD! (Okay, maybe you can help if you've got younger siblings who still talk to you despite your advanced age and decrepitude.)

 

Webwork




msg:319232
 11:25 pm on Jul 18, 2005 (gmt 0)

Bunch of old farts here, huh? I'm doomed to incapacity! Never to understand! Once again generations are like ships passing in the night.

Not that having a better handle on anything would change anything: Clean up your room! Do your homework! It's 2:00 A.M. - go to bed! It is NOT acceptable that you consume THAT MUCH beer! DON'T go near a car if you've had a single beer to drink! Get a job!

And so it goes Billy Pilgrim and so it goes . . .

suzyvirtual




msg:319233
 11:36 pm on Jul 18, 2005 (gmt 0)

Chiming in as admittedly archaic, yet hanging by a thread onto my own viridity.
It's the same as it's always been. With less years, time, money and faith invested in the system, one has the clarity to see that it is largely a crock.
However, one also has the inexperience not to notice the bits that actually have time-tested merit.
Every new generation is a generation of revolution (until they get old).
No need to invest in a blow torch, some young lady will fix the piles for the boy soon enough...
Ask your young'un's to burn you a mix CD of their favorite songs; that should give you some insight.
Good luck :)

Syzygy




msg:319234
 11:40 pm on Jul 18, 2005 (gmt 0)

What am I missing?

Is the mind set today any different than it's ever been?

- My parents just don't get it!
- I don't want to be like my parents!
- Old people lead @%##ed up lives!

What do young folk yearn for and what do they fear?

Is this a generation of hope, fear or what?

Is work synonymous with one's life being over?

We all ask these very same questions throughout the ages. No generation is different. The key to understanding is: When you asked them (the questions - as a rebellious teenager yourself), how did you find - and what were - the answers?

Syzygy

pmac




msg:319235
 12:20 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Dude, face it, your old. The first step in the program is acceptance.

;-)

Quinn




msg:319236
 12:20 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

And so it goes Billy Pilgrim and so it goes . . .

Did you not answer yourself there?

You have become unstuck in time?

Along the same lines....a suggestion to the author of that book before it was written:

Why don't you write an anti-glacier book instead?

Poo-tee-weet?

lawman




msg:319237
 12:46 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

You need a new bambino. :)

Webwork




msg:319238
 12:48 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

"Listen" . . . Quinn, I can't remember being other than unstuck in time since before I can remember . . . or is that starting tomorrow? ;0)

Here's my an old folks retrospective to youth:

"The seasons they go round and round, the painted ponies go up and down . . ."

"When will they ever learn, when will they ever learn . . ."

"Well come on all of you big strong men, Uncle Sam needs your help again, . . ."

Timeless.

Now, please help. What is defining to this upcomming generation?

Quinn




msg:319239
 12:56 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Becoming undefined just as fast as their eyes can absorb the television?

Quinn




msg:319240
 12:58 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

What is defining to this upcomming generation?

What was their response to the question?

Kirby




msg:319241
 1:15 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

from [familyeducation.com...]

Researchers recently discovered that adults think with the prefrontal cortex, the rational part of the brain; teens process information with the amygdala, the instinctual, emotional part of the brain. Teens don't think, ''Binge drinking is very dangerous and stupid.'' Rather, it's ''Oh, boy, a chugging contest! Wouldn't it be cool if I won?''

What the Experts Say
As recently as 1997, conventional thinking, heralded during the White House Conference on Early Learning and Childhood Development, held that the greatest time of brain growth occurred before the age of 18 months, and was set forever by the age of three. But scientists spent the last several years scanning teens' brains in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine and discovered that the prefrontal cortex, which makes people ''act like an adult,'' is not fully developed in a teenager until after the age of 18.

So there you have it. Your kids are just starting to use the same part of the brain you are using.

encyclo




msg:319242
 1:35 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

I'm not sure of the problem here. You are fulfilling your role: "get a job", "don't drink too much", etc. etc. They are fulfilling their role: getting blind drunk, sleeping all day, partying all night, etc. etc. This is how it is meant to be, and how it always was. When I was 19, all I wanted to do was drink and get, well, you know. Same for you, surely?

If you can't be wild and irresponsible when you're 19, when can you?

hannamyluv




msg:319243
 1:47 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

If you don't rebel by the time you are 20, you have no heart, if you don't conform by 30, you have no brain.
Quoted from Swimming with Sharks but I think its been around for awhile in other forms

Give them something to rebel against and then don't worry too much until they hit 30. ;)

grandpa




msg:319244
 2:49 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

There's a 17 and 19 yo lurking about the household here. Getting their input on this matter would require far more effort than I have to give.

lawman




msg:319245
 3:17 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

My parents had four sons. At various and sundry times, they had to get three of us out of jail. Twenty seven years ago, one of my brothers drowned in a scuba diving accident. Before he died, he opened his own business. Of the remaining three brothers, two of us are lawyers and one is a veterinarian. My parents survived and are in their seventies.

I have two grown daughters. One of them was arrested while a senior in high school. (I hired a good lawyer and the charges were dropped). I found that if they can survive high school they have a pretty good chance of making it. Both daughters have college degrees. The oldest has decided follow in her mother's footsteps and get a bachelor's degree in nursing. She has two years to go. Oh yeah, she has my only granddaughter. I'm in my middle fifties and I survived.

Now I have a nine year old son. I'll let you know in about fifteen years whether I survived or not. :)

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:319246
 8:14 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Ride it out it will probably be OK in the end.

I don't really think that much has changed between the generations but, (mid fifties hat goes one), discipline and respect are not what they once were. I walk down the street and I am forced to move out of the way of strutting, cocky 14 year olds. They eff and blind quite openly with no regard for who is around them, and that's just the girls.

I seem to remember that when I was their age I could eff and blind with the best of them but I kept it within my own company and I had respect for (most) adults. No more it seems.

On a brighter note I remember once reading about a young guy who said that when he was 18 years old he could not believe how stupid his father was. When he was 28 he could not believe how much his dad had learned in ten years ;)

Essex_boy




msg:319247
 9:57 am on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Me and my mates as teenagers did really silly things, kinda stuff I now have to frown upon in my day job.

Hell I didnt turn out so bad, and I guess they wont either - I think I was just pushing my luck.

Skylo




msg:319248
 2:03 pm on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Well webwork,
I am 21 and am confused by your question. Things have not changed from when you were at school and when i was at school, the social and technological atmosphere has.
If you help me understand what it is you are confused about maybe i can elaborate:-)

At the end of the day there is a lot more available making it more scary to take that initial jump from the nest. So maybe this is a generation of fear, but i think more than anything else it will prove to be the generation of innovation!

I have no idea of what more to write. I need to go home and clean up those piles of clothes before my girlfriend gets home;-)

Skylo




msg:319249
 2:06 pm on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

I have only just read Essex_boy's post and have to agree,
we have all done some dumb stuff(as i am sure is the case for most on the forum) and my mates and i are especially guilty of this. But hey we all turned out fine...

rocknbil




msg:319250
 4:27 pm on Jul 19, 2005 (gmt 0)

Is the mind set today any different than it's ever been?

This has been a topic of large debate around our house and is also a sore spot. I see some terrifying trends in the mindset of our youths, things that are VERY different than previous generations.

Even as late as the 60's and 70's, most of us knew the word adversity. Not just it's definition, but understood it through hard times and struggles, we remember what it's like to have your very survival in jeopardy.

I can't remember the author, I think it was a president, who said, "The only right we've lost is the right to starve." We see other parents, who should be preparing for the time in their life to enjoy their own lives and each other, working for their children. Taking on second and even third jobs to finance their kids' car payments and educations. "Sorry, I can't come to that gathering because Suzie needs to go to swimming at 2, Melissa to band practice at 4, and I need to take Jane shopping." What makes this disturbing is that Suzie, Melissa, and Jane are 16, 17, and older, and all capable of walking, bike riding, or otherwise using their own resources to get to their various appointments.

If we didn't learn it from our parents, we learned it from life: Get off your keester and assume control of your own destiny. You have a bike, ride it to school. You want money, go get a part-time job, and no we have to work so we won't be driving your lazy butt around town. You want to go to college, do the work, get the grants and scholarships, and take out student loans. Figure it out.

So to answer this question, I say YES. The mindset of today's children is molded by their parents, as it always has been. But in the interest of making better lives for them, in trying to give them all the things we didn't have, we've made a majority of them over-dependent on us (as parents) to give, give, give, and many of them are lazy, shiftless, without direction, and worst of all, selfish. A lot of them won't even think for themselves and expect parents or society to do the thinking for them. Ask yourself one question: why are there so many pregnant teens in the world at a time when there is absolutely no excuse for not using birth control?

We are not helping our children by being supermoms and superdads. We're just setting them up for a lifelong crisis of co-dependency. The less you give your children, the stronger they will be.

I have a daughter who was college material - on her own time. She elected to join the Army, spend a year in Iraq, and has just returned for her last year stateside. She's already married, and is beginning her life with $20,000 in the bank, $35,000 to start her education, and has a job working in a civilian hospital in the OBGYN clinic. She did this herself because (in her mind) her old man was a selfish old fart who wouldn't give her anything. But I gave her the best thing of all: her own self-dependence.

Already, she has a start at life that is 10 times what I had fresh out of high school, and she did it on her own.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:319251
 7:39 am on Jul 20, 2005 (gmt 0)

I am 21 and am confused by your question. Things have not changed from when you were at school and when i was at school, the social and technological atmosphere has.

Skylo, how do you know what it was like when Webwork was at school? You are only 21 ;)

When you are 41 your opinions on many things will be completely different. Believe me!

BDW (56)

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