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Hot chilli's?
What's the hottest
Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:34 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

So, there are Habanero's and Scotch Bonnet's. Hmm.

Forget the chillies on their own: what is the fiercest concentrate, or conncoction that you know?

I ask because I have a friend who's on a chilli kick - in seek of the ultimate hot experience. He laughs in the face of bird's eye's. The hottest Thai curry is but a bit of spice on the tongue. A proper Indian P(h)all curry is a pleasurable experience, and he has beaten the challenge of every restaurant he's been to in London, across every cuisine, and is still seeking more.

Someone in our local London pub hints, but merely hints, that there are 'other things out there' that we in the UK do not have the stomach for - stuff that requires you to sign a release form before it is sold...

Does such stuff exist? Regardless, what's your hottest?

Syzygy

 

vkaryl

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:37 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

I like a bit of heat, but not to the extent you're looking for.

My b-i-l pops Scotch Bonnets as if they're peanuts. Don't know WHAT he does for "really hot". He lives in New Mexico, and the hottest Hatch chiles are mild to him. Next time I talk to him I'll ask him about "really HOT"....

[Edit: it's "chile" if one is speaking of peppers and their cousins, "chili" if it's a sauce or such made of "chiles"....]

Visit Thailand

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:44 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Thai food has to be among the hottest in the world, but forget about restaurants outside of Thailand that create the spice for Western palates.

Try larb moo (minced pork) or som tam (papaya salad) at regular Thai spiciness and it is sure to blow your socks off.

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:53 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Edit: it's "chile" if one is speaking of peppers and their cousins, "chili" if it's a sauce or such made of "chiles"....

Not in the UK; it's chilli in the singular & chillies in the plural.

And, just to confuse things, a dish of mince, tomato, kidney beans and chillies (in the plural) is called a chilli (spelt in the singular, but meant in the collective).

Syzygy

vkaryl

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:54 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Heh.... well, have fun in the US Southwest! Chiles being essentially Tex-Mex, the confusion should be delectable. Remember to invite me....

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:58 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Try larb moo (minced pork) or som tam (papaya salad) at regular Thai spiciness and it is sure to blow your socks off.

Recipe please (and indication of, which/what amount of, chillies used)...

Send me a 'sticky' if you wish...

Syzygy

kodaks

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 2:58 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Check this out, it has a few worthwhile links:
[ask.yahoo.com...]

Visit Thailand

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 3:08 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Recipe? Sorry am not a cook. So you know in Thailand when you order Som Tam from a street vendor you can actually ask for as many chilli's as you want, so the heat is up to you.

The bird chilli (which is a very small chilli) is commonly used in Thailand and is among the hottest in the world.

I believe there is one hotter but forget its name.

I am sure you already know that with a chilli it is not the skin but the seeds that give the hit. Cooking with bird chilli's requires a good cleaning of the hands afterwards.

vkaryl

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 3:29 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

My understanding is that the hottest substance on earth at present is something chemists concoct in labs. Can't remember what its "name" is (like, THERE'S a surprise, since its "real name" is probably 35 syllables long, and I'm lucky on any given day to remember just exactly WHO I am, and how to get there from here....) It's one of those chemical contraptions like what makes beer skunky....

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 4:19 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

My quote...

So, there are Habanero's and Scotch Bonnet's. Hmm.
I ask because I have a friend who's on a chilli kick - in seek of the ultimate hot experience. He laughs in the face of bird's eye's. The hottest Thai curry is but a bit of spice on the tongue. A proper Indian P(h)all curry is a pleasurable experience, and he has beaten the challenge of every restaurant he's been to in London, across every cuisine, and is still seeking more.

Emphasis added

What's hotter..?

Syzygy

oldskool79

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 5:31 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Try a spoonfull of Wasabi. It's not a chili but a root from a japanese plant. They serve it with sushi in Japanese restaurants. IMO, this is way hotter than any chili.

I love hot stuff...and usually load it on. But with wasabi......i'm very very liberal with it ;-)

httpwebwitch

WebmasterWorld Administrator httpwebwitch us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 5:47 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

raw habaneros and scotch bonnets have the highest concentration of capsaicin (spelling varies depending who you ask. a.k.a. capsicum), which is the chemical that irritates your mouth and gives the "hot" feeling.

To get a hotter experience, you need to choose optimizing preparation methods. the seeds are usually the hottest part of the pepper, so the more seeds are involved, the more pain you'll probably feel. Cooking kills the volatile oils, so raw is better... plump, fresh peppers are hotter than ones that have been festering in the grocery store for a week.

Though it might not rate as high on the hot scale as munching a handful of raw chilies, try this recipe, which my weird friend used to eat:

cut the top off a HABANERO and hollow it out. Save the innards. Mix a paste of equal parts WASABI and CHEESE WHIZ, and add the habanero seeds and some bread crumbs. stuff the pepper with the cheese-wasabi mix, then put it in the microwave for 15 seconds or so - just long enough to make the cheese gooey. eat with caution.

I doubt it tastes all that great... I'm pretty sure it was just a macho thing.

Ever had a "prairie fire"? it's a shot of equal parts tequila and tabasco... for a thrill replace the tabasco with one of those gourmet super-hot asswhupping sauces. some people really dig that...

httpwebwitch

WebmasterWorld Administrator httpwebwitch us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 5:49 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

ditto on the wasabi. Japanese horseradish. It's wicked stuff. it's a different "kind" of hot, so if you're desensitized to chilies you might get your kicks from wasabi, et vice versa

Visit Thailand

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 6:04 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

yes wasabi is more of a mustard style hot, but still leathal!

ogletree

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 6:38 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

This was interesting.

[answers.google.com...]

dmorison

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 8:36 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Chicken Vindaloo Roulette, Serves 4

Ingredients:

Oil for frying
2 chicken breasts, chopped into bite size pieces
Dave's Insanity Hot Sauce [davesgourmet.com]
1 jar cook-in mild curry sauce
Rice to serve

Method:

1. Using the sharp end of a skewer or other narrow sharp implement, cut a tiny hole in 1 piece of chicken and carefully inject a few drops of Dave's Insanity Hot Sauce.

2. Fry the spiked piece of chicken individually until sealed.

3. Put aside the spiked piece of chicken, clean out pan and replace oil.

4. Fry the remaining chicken until sealed, and then add the spiked piece of chicken.

5. Proceed with recipe on jar of cook-in curry sauce; or your own favourite "mild" curry recipe.

;)

Macro

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 9:18 am on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Does such stuff exist? Regardless, what's your hottest?

19,467.

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 4:11 pm on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

19,467?

Syzygy

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 4:57 pm on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

I think I've found what I was looking for, with thanks to dmorison for pointing me in the right direction...

UKchilefarm [chilefarm.co.uk]

Good God!

Syzygy

PatrickDeese

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 5:58 pm on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

You might want to try chili piquin [images.google.com] - you won't find them in any grocery store - but they grow pretty much anywhere (you can order the seeds online), and they are bright red.

They are very, very hot. When I lived in Texas, I grew them in my back yard, and a couple of them made just about any dish incredibly fiery.

Here in Mexico, one of the nicest chiles you can get are fresh Chile Manzano [theproducehunter.com]. They are about the size of a plum, and the first time I tried one I used a whole one in the dish I was making. Nowadays I use half :). They are yellow much like a sweet yellow bell pepper, and have round black seeds.

They are pretty much my favorite nowadays, though I use a dried chile for my spicy mashed potatoes. They call it "Cascabel" (which means rattle, because you can hear the seeds rattling inside) or or "Rojo" because they are red. They are usually about 4 - 6 inches long, with a tapering point - generally medium to hot.

Spicy Mashed Potatoes

Wash and cube small (lemon sized) unpeeled white potatoes.

Put cubes into large pot with a 1 1/2 table spoons of salt and water.

For every 2-3 potatoes add: 1 dried chile Cascabel pod (broken in half, stem removed), 1 garlic clove (mashed), and some fresh ground black pepper (according to taste).

For every 6-8 potatoes: add 1 diced bermuda onion.

Cover and boil until potatoes have softened sufficiently.

Pour through a colander, then dump everything into a large mixing bowl.

Add butter and milk and fresh cream to taste and mash the potatoes as much as you like. Sometimes the softened chile pods need to be ripped into smaller portions, which I just do by hand.

I personally like my mashed potatoes with a bit of texture, so I leave them a bit lumpy.

They go great with steaks, grilled chicken breasts etc, they taste great have bright red and purple flecks from the chile and onions with adds some nice color to the boring "mashed potatoes" on your meat and potatoes dinner.

martinibuster

WebmasterWorld Administrator martinibuster us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 6:25 pm on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Let's not forget the smoky goodness of chipotle peppers. If you can get them dried, just pop them into a sauce for a few minutes then pull them out to impart their smoky chile flavor. If you can get them in a small can, some chefs (notably the chef at the Coyote Cafe in Santa Fe) use the sauce they come in to liven up every type sauce.

Authentic New Mexican Green chilis from Hatch are a treat. Bueno brand frozen green chili is the best in terms of frozen. Of course, fresh roasted from the roasters on the streets of New Mexico during the fall are the best. I have eaten them on pizza, eggs, Italian food, and dessert.

Authentic New Mexican green chilis can be hot, but not neccessarily the hottest. Nevertheless, they are versatile and tasty.

vkaryl

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 6:53 pm on Dec 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Ooooohhhh - I LOVE the Coyote Cafe! Will get back there in May....

mivox

WebmasterWorld Senior Member mivox us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 8:17 pm on Dec 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

Tell your friend to start huffing bear repellant spray [udap.com], if he's that desperate for a capsicum high... ;)

Syzygy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 10:46 pm on Dec 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

Whoo-hoo! Nice one, mivox. A couple of nan bread with that and he'll be well happy!

Syzygy

mivox

WebmasterWorld Senior Member mivox us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 11:32 pm on Dec 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

Indeed, the mfr. claims approx. 3,000,000 Scoville Heat Units for the bear spray. That ought to outdo a habanero (~200,000-300,000 SHU)... lol

Essex_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member essex_boy us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 4:05 pm on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

I love curry try a Chicken Phial.

Man most indians dont have them on teh menu, they are hot.

theriddla1019

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 10:54 pm on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Well if you want to try hot sauce, i think the two absolute hottest would be Daves Insanity Sauce, which has a smokey barbacue flavor but much of it is covered up by how hot it is, and the ultimate Endorphin Rush... which i cannot taste any flavor because it is so intensly hot and also have seen a grown man that can eat habanero's whole with no problems cry cause he put too much on his tortilla and didnt realize it and ate it :P

Teknorat

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 11:47 pm on Dec 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Or if you want to go un-natural: [pyrodiablo.com...] technically not a chilli sauce that's still pretty impressive.

vkaryl

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 12:00 am on Dec 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Teknorat's link brings up a point that probably needs to be mentioned: when ingesting anything as hot as some of you are discussing you need to make sure you DO NOT use water as a chaser! All water does is spread the flame.

Use milk or beer.... milk is probably better overall, but may not fit with the theme of the meal. Beer is the usual drink of choice in Tex-Mex restaurants for a reason....

Teknorat

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 8219 posted 12:13 am on Dec 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Yep yep- fat or alcohol will dissipate the capsaicin. Water will not- in fact if you cut up chillies and accidently touch your eyes do NOT try and rinse with water- it spreads the capsaicin and hurts a lot. :( Use milk instead. (Gross yes but neccessary.)

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