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Can I Connect Two D-Link Routers To Each Other?
Looking to expand the amount of ports...
HyperGeek




msg:313474
 6:32 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)


I'm router-retarded. Used to use a Lynksys and it gave the option of sacrificing a port to add another router.

Can I just connect two D-Link routers together or will this not work?

After a bit of apprehension, I really like the D-Link router since it was so much easier to setup - but will have to get another Lynksys if there are no options to expand.

 

Bowdii




msg:313475
 6:57 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

A friend of mine connects 2 routers togeather. If you operate a ftp site then it can get tricky sharing through 2 routers but otherwise you should have no problem.

Captaffy




msg:313476
 8:37 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

So you just want to be able to plug more devices in to the router?

Here is my understanding (if it's completely off base, please someone else help HyperGeek):

You need a switch, which you would then plug in to one of the ports on the router. You then plug any extra devices in to the switch.

If you have two routers, you should be able to connect them together and then turn off the routing functions on the second router. This will allow the second router to operate as a switch

I suspect this is what your Linksys was letting you do.

(Edited to make it more clear.)

HyperGeek




msg:313477
 10:27 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

The DI-604 model actually has a 4-port switch built in.

So does this mean I can just plug another one up to it using one of the four ports?

bcolflesh




msg:313478
 10:29 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

Normally you would need to use the uplink port - according to this review:

extrememhz.com/di604-p1.shtml

"The D-Link DI-604 intentionally does not have an uplink port. Every port on the DI-604 is auto negotiating."

- so just plug it in.

jaylark




msg:313479
 10:55 pm on Dec 2, 2003 (gmt 0)


If you have two routers, you should be able to connect them together and then turn off the routing functions on the second router. This will allow the second router to operate as a switch

I do this with SMC and Linksys routers and it works just fine.

mcavic




msg:313480
 4:35 am on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

To connect hubs/switches together, there are 3 options, depending on the type of hub/switch:

(1) just connect them together, maybe the ports are autosensing. Most that I've seen are not.
(2) connect an uplink port on one to a normal port on the other.
(3) if there isn't an uplink port, then connect two normal ports together using a crossover cable.

Captaffy




msg:313481
 7:35 am on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

The DI-604 model actually has a 4-port switch built in.

Routers that you get for home networks are generally a router and a switch in one box. Otherwise people would have to buy a switch as well.

So does this mean I can just plug another one up to it using one of the four ports?

Yes, and I believe it will still work even if both routers are routing. But the second one just needs to function as a switch, and you should make sure that's what it's doing. (Consult the manual, or Google, or D-Link I guess.)

It sounds like (from another post) that you just have to plug it in.

Hope we helped. I was actually just reading about this same situation recently. I'm definitely not an expert though.

HyperGeek




msg:313482
 4:18 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

That article seemed to have said it all.

The kicker is that this router was only $40! Man, technology is getting really inexpensive. I remember when a 28.8 external zoom modem went for $150-$200.

Macro




msg:313483
 5:28 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

I remember when a 28.8 external zoom modem went for $150-$200.

You've been around too long :-)

sun818




msg:313484
 5:36 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

> technology is getting really inexpensive

Prices stay the same - the difference is what is considered the "latest feature". Now they have routers with 802.11g wireless access points @ 54 Mbps built-in with USB print servers.

Macguru




msg:313485
 5:38 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

What about coughing

2000 $ for 2 megs of ram
1800 $ for a 20 megs HD
550 $ for a 128 k floppy drive
249 $ for a dual button joystick
and 10 $ for a 800 k disquette?

At that time, a loaf of sliced bread was 35 cents and I paid 125 $ a month for a dencent 6 room appartment.

getting more grey hairs... no wonder I slide off topic... ;)

mcavic




msg:313486
 6:24 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

My first PC was a 386, 20 MHz from Gateway, 8 megs RAM, 65 meg hard drive (anyone remember RLL drives?)... $2800 in 1990.

HyperGeek




msg:313487
 7:54 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

My first PC was a 386, 20 MHz from Gateway, 8 megs RAM, 65 meg hard drive (anyone remember RLL drives?)... $2800 in 1990.

1988 - 286/12, 32Meg RAM, 40Meg HD, 9600 baud modem

The full-tilt boogie machine for all of your BBS and ANSI designing needs.

bcolflesh




msg:313488
 8:06 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

1967 - Univac 1107 - came on a flatbed trailer and blew all the fuses in my neighborhood.

HyperGeek




msg:313489
 8:43 pm on Dec 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

Before we know it, we'll be discussing original Fortran and punch cards.

bedlam




msg:313490
 12:40 am on Dec 4, 2003 (gmt 0)

...I remember my first abacus, now that was a beauty...

;-p

-B

XtendScott




msg:313491
 7:19 am on Dec 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

OH the WayBack machine.

TRS80 w/tape drive, Commador64, first real PC was IBM PS/2 286/20 upgraded to 2meg Ram and 20meg HD. Second was a Gateway 486/33 with 210 HD all the space you need. :)

XtendScott




msg:313492
 8:06 am on Dec 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

Well Back on Topic,

I agree with Cap.

The two routers will work but there would be (2) networks if both are functioning as a router. I have an older LinkSys but can turn of the "Gateway" aspect but leaves the router function which may work if it is the internal and if you also turn off the DHCP(dumb it down).

I don't have a D-Link but was able to configure a Belkin Wireless Router to act as an Access Point which turns it to a Hub/switch. With it acting as a router I can get outside access but not access to local network without going to the outside and then back in. Might have gotten it to work but really didn't take the time.

As said some switches/routers have AutoSensing witch allows you to connect the two without a Crossover Cable, but they are available at most computer stores or someone with the knowledge could make one.

Extra Techi info:
Crossover cable = end1(whiteOrange, Orange, WhiteGreen, Blue, WhiteBlue, Green, whiteBrown, Brown) -> end2(WhiteGreen, Green, WhiteOrange, Blue, WhiteBlue, Orange, WhiteBrown, Brown) in other words, swap Orange and Green.

Hope you can get it working.

jbinbpt




msg:313493
 9:24 am on Dec 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

IBM with a 8088 processor. I thought I was king of the world ;)

HyperGeek




msg:313494
 10:04 pm on Dec 5, 2003 (gmt 0)

You were... in 1982. ;)

I *still* work off, and refurbish my own IBM keyboards. There's nothing like rapid-fire "CLACKS" when you're typing.

[bbsing.com...]

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