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This 39 message thread spans 2 pages: 39 ( [1] 2 > >     
Ridiculous things said during job interviews
...Or, how not to get the job
Lilliabeth

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:16 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

This one had seemed qualified, but we passed:
"You might as well know that I am not one of those rah, rah team people. I won't be expected to socialize with the rest of the staff, will I?" Just scary odd.

And a different person:
"Funny you should mention that! The judge said exactly the same thing this morning," The judge? "Yes, I had to see the judge this morning - I violated my probation again."

And we get lots of resumes where the cover page just ruins their chances. For example, if we advertised a receptionist position, we would get many of the following:

Objective: Attaining a position where I can utilize my people-management skills (or project management skills, or hair-cutting skills, or any other thing totally unrelated to the advertised opening)

It is also not the smartest thing for a woman to tell the interviewer that she hopes to start her family this year. While I would never discriminate, it is safe to assume telling them you plan to immediately leave on maternity is not appealing to the interviewer.

While I would never discriminate, would y'all agree it would be best to wait until you're done with the crutches and wincing in pain with every step rather than having to explain that you just had your third back surgery?

 

D_Blackwell

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:53 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

"You might as well know that I am not one of those rah, rah team people. I won't be expected to socialize with the rest of the staff, will I?"

This fits a lot of people. Not everyone is looking for adoption into the company family. They think that it's sufficient to work hard, do a good job, and go home to a real family.

There is a vast difference between getting along well with people, and signing on to a lot of rah, rah, hoo-ya.

Essex_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member essex_boy us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:57 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

Interviews from hell:

All are true I held teh interviews.

Woman walks in and says 'so can you tell me what the F all this Sh*ts about then?'- Offered her a job safe in teh knowledge she wouldnt take it. Blood drains from face. Reported her to the dole office.

Woman walks - spends half an hour tidying up desks (without any prompting) then she walks out half way through the interview. Just gets up and walks.

Essex_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member essex_boy us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:58 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

rah, rah, hoo-ya.- true theres this phone shop in Chelmsford high street go past early enough in the morninng and the staff are playing silly motivation games with a ball.

You can see on their faces that they hate it! Just brings a smile to face every time

PhraSEOlogy

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:17 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

Many years ago I applied for a job as a C programmer (getting tired of working with COBOL). During the interview the woman conducting the interview changed tack and said, you have a lot of experience working with COBOL - would you consider another COBOL type position? After ranting on about how much I hated COBOL she said - thats a pity I was going to offer you a job as a systems analyst!

Blew that one...

walkman



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:40 pm on Jun 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

>> This fits a lot of people. Not everyone is looking for adoption into the company family. They think that it's sufficient to work hard, do a good job, and go home to a real family.

that is true, but the interview is not the place to mention this.

BillyS

WebmasterWorld Senior Member billys us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 1:19 am on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

I just interviewed someone recently...

"What's your policy on working from home?"

I was saying to myself... "Didn't you listen to me describing the job for the last ten minutes? The job involves closely supporting another workgroup. And they are located here in the office."

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 1:34 am on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

From a male database analyst being interviewed by me on a recruiting trip in Europe for a job in the U.S., "I don't deal well with women and I don't like them asking me questions. Don't you have a man available who you could give me the interview instead?"

Gee, sure then we can all go to California and you can meet your new boss who is a woman, and her boss who is also a woman, and your lesbian cube mate.

LifeinAsia

WebmasterWorld Administrator lifeinasia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:37 pm on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

that is true, but the interview is not the place to mention this.

Sorry, but I have to disagree- the interview is exactly the place for that. (Although the interviewee could have been a lot more tactful.) The company and potential employee both need to know it's going to be a good fit for both. Otherwise, it's a waste of time for both sides.

Hiring a work-9-to-5-then-go-home-to-my-family person for a company that has a very close-kniw family-type work environment where the people do a lot of things together is not a good match. It will cause friction among the ranks and lower morale.

Lilliabeth

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:56 pm on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

(Although the interviewee could have been a lot more tactful.)

Yes, it was the lack of tact that so was bothersome to me at the time. I hoped she meant "I don't want to work in a we-all-go-out-together-after-work place", but it certainly came out like "My husband is a state politician (he was) so I will not be hanging out with you geeks."

Also, I like the whole concept of teamwork. I'm not at all into the rah-rah BS (didn't that go out of style in the 80s?), but I think the best work comes from a group of people who have a common goal (and isn't that the definition of a team?), as opposed to a group of people who each have a goal of getting a paycheck on Friday and that's all.

walkman



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:59 pm on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

>> Sorry, but I have to disagree- the interview is exactly the place for that.

I guess we have to disagree. We ALL have pet-peeves, likes, dis-likes, different personalities and if we mentioned them, we would not get hired. The interview is about what you can for them, not what the employer can do for you, or what's wrong with you. While they know that employees are far from perfect, they don't want to hear their complaints or personality flaws.

One can be honest at the unemployment office :)

kpaul

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 4:02 pm on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

<that is true, but the interview is not the place to mention this. >

he was honest and upfront about it - that has to be worth something?

-kpaul

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 4:40 pm on Jun 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

Just scary odd.

I used to do a lot of hiring and I would agree. I usually hired peple with very good technical skills, but sometimes they didn't work out because they were too difficult for other people to work with. In hindsight, I should have paid more attention to red flags like that.

walkman



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:22 am on Jun 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

CNN: "...Unfortunately, sometimes it screams, 'Don't hire me.' " He adds, "I look at about 200 resumes a week, and I've read plenty that do refer to the job seeker's divorce." Prencipe has even seen at least one resume that gave the reason for the split-up, i.e., a cheating spouse. This is way, way too much information.

Prencipe also counsels against "saving your resume as 'sssee#*$!yyy_2006' and sending it as an attachment, or listing your reply e-mail address as bruceypants@" - and yes, those are both real-life examples, as are the resumes that detail the reasons why job seekers were fired from previous jobs."
[money.cnn.com...]

I hope the link is OK mods, it's a legit site :)

ogletree

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:32 am on Jun 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

I interviewed a girl that had just left Enron. She was clueless about the real world. She was applying for a web dev positon and new nothing about web dev. I'm not even sure what she did at enron. She worked in the web department. I know she got paid a lot. She also told me she was getting married soon. I have no idea why she was looking for a job. She was never going to get the pay she was getting at enron. There are a lot of people looking for an easy high paying job. Funny thing is there are jobs like that. When I was in IT I knew guys that would sit around all day playing video games and got paid $100k a year.

vincevincevince

WebmasterWorld Senior Member vincevincevince us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:39 am on Jun 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Whilst some things come across as a weakness to you, they will come across as a strength to the right employer.

Take, for example, getting married and having children:

Tradition in Britain has it that a respectable firm does not employ those who did not become family men in a timely fashion and in the past employers would certainly do their best to hint to and even matchmake amongst staff.

Attitudes in some firms have changed to the extent that having two kids and plans for two more will sometimes be viewed as a negative point. Incidentally these also tend to be the kinds of firm which expect employees to work late and socialise with each other. I suspect it's possibly to make up for the more empty lives of other such employees.

Another example is personal presentation:

Traditionally, turning up for a job interview in less than a smart suit, tie and polished shoes was a sure way not to get the job. If you cannot persuade the employer that you are 100% professional and an upright kind of a chap, what chance do you have of giving that impression to clients and partners.

I now am told, but have not seen, that some firms prefer both candidates and employees to dress in a casual style, even to the extent of wearing jeans. A friend of mine attended an interview for a commerical design post and said not a single applicant was wearing a suit and tie.

With that in mind I doubt there are any stupid things to say in an interview. What you think of as stupid has just saved you hiring the wrong candidate, and I'm sure that wouldn't be in the best interest of either party. Likewise, failing to say the so-labelled stupid phrase in another job interview could mean the difference between being recognised as the perfect person for the position and being put in the run-of-the-mill pile.

walkman



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 4:02 am on Jun 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

>> With that in mind I doubt there are any stupid things to say in an interview.

sure they are: know your audience comes to mind. What might be funny in a web upstart interview might not funny if you interview with a law firm.

Automan Empire

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 5:16 am on Jun 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

A very dour old guy applied for a position, saying he had owned a shop like mine, and HATED it, and it kind of went belly up, and he kind of retired gratefully, but was now running low on money and Needed to get a job.
Mind you he was applying for THE customer interface position in the company, in a business where you need to be chipper and kind to clients as they spend large sums they'd rather not. The ad specified a fast-paced environment no less!

Another applicant for the same position became testy and snappish when asked if they were up to the challenge of persuading reluctant people to spend the aforementioned large sums. I mean, four questions into the interview and all pretense of best behavior was already forgotten. No matter, they had already blown the interview with, "Oh, you wanted a resume too?" when that was specified in the ad and on the phone.

I dread the next round of interviews, as the current employee plateaued not long after joining. For thousands spent on help wanted ads, every candidate besides referrals for this position has been choosing the best of a bad lot. There is trepidation on BOTH sides of the interview table!
-Automan

tiori

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 6:38 pm on Jun 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

When I was in IT I knew guys that would sit around all day playing video games and got paid $100k a year.

Sounds like my kind of job!

bcolflesh

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 6:52 pm on Jun 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

"You might as well know that I am not one of those rah, rah team people. I won't be expected to socialize with the rest of the staff, will I?"

Good for them - I realize that incompetent/stupid people get along in life by "social networking", but it's good to hear someone told the truth about their feelings in a job interview. I guess most companies want the same kind of liars they already employ.

D_Blackwell

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:09 pm on Jun 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

I guess most companies want the same kind of liars they already employ.

The interview processes that I've seen certainly show that. Makes me very grateful to very happy where I am. (The best positions and the best employees are cherry picked anyway, with the 'interview' if there is one, being a formality.)

Lilliabeth

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:29 pm on Jun 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

Nope!

We want people who work well with others and get along well with others and understand the concept of a common goal.

We do not want snobby witches who think everyone else is beneath them.

I have never worked anywhere in my life where it was in any way dictated to me who I would socialize with, so it is hard for me to understand that that would be a huge concern.

But I have worked places with culture problems, like where the exempt workers would not be caught dead talking to the warehouse guys.

Teamwork is essential in most endevours. To say you aren't a team player is like saying you aren't employable.

ogletree

WebmasterWorld Senior Member ogletree us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 9:04 pm on Jun 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

I would hate to have to hire people in the government for IT positions. They set up job requirements that list everything on the planet and then say they only pay $30k a year or something like that. I did some contract work at a military base and the goofballs working there knew nothing. No matter what your requirements are if you don't pay what the job is worth you are only going to get people that are willing to lie on their resume.

le_gber

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 7:43 am on Jun 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

Teamwork is essential in most endevours. To say you aren't a team player is like saying you aren't employable.

to say you don't want to spend your Friday's after work down the pub doesn't mean that you are not a team player or that you cannot work towards a common goal.

In your case, you were at the interview and you can add tone and attitude to what she said. From what you added, yes saying what she did wasn't a really clever thing to do.

But taking it only on her words "I won't be expected to socialize with the rest of the staff, will I?" only means that she didn't want to feel rejected or a loner if she didn't want to get plastered every weekend with the other staff members.

walkman



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 7:55 am on Jun 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

le_gber,
does it really matter that what she said can be interpreted differently? It sends out bad vibes, and with 2 people applying, the other one will get the job. Ultimately, the interviewer is the judge, jury and the executioner.

Essex_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member essex_boy us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 7:02 pm on Jun 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

I get along well with poeple work mates etc and work to team targets etc butttttt I dont like to mix after work.

Cant say ive been to Xmas dinners ive enjoyed with a firm, I avoid these now.

My current contract firm has a July Ball - Hell I asked to be taken off the invite list. Dont want to know thank you.

pmkpmk

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:21 pm on Jun 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

I now am told, but have not seen, that some firms prefer both candidates and employees to dress in a casual style

It's only for internships, but I tell the applicants to come as they are. Saves a lot of embarrasment and makes the interview a bit more relaxed.

internetheaven

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 8:46 am on Jun 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

Cant say ive been to Xmas dinners ive enjoyed with a firm, I avoid these now.

On a related topic, I get invites to "big do's" all the time from Affiliate Networks, Law Firms, Forums and even my Server Hosting Company!

I too have never once gone to one of these things. I have no interest in socialising with any of these people. Or should I say, I have no interest in getting drunk with these people ...

I would personally consider someone who wishes to avoid after-work socialising as a plus. The worst thing in the world is having to keep coming out of your office to tell everyone to get back to work because they're all sat around chatting. People can still work well in a team but not want to go paintballing together. If they are only in it for the money then they will actually WORK better together because that is all they'll be doing, working. And there's no chance of an office fight breaking out when one gets the other one pregnant ... true story ....

Essex_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member essex_boy us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 9:39 am on Jun 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have no interest in getting drunk with these people - Thats about the strength of it.

You really cant do as you would amongst mates.

Sarah Atkinson

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10351 posted 3:19 pm on Jun 12, 2006 (gmt 0)


>> This fits a lot of people. Not everyone is looking for adoption into the company family. They think that it's sufficient to work hard, do a good job, and go home to a real family.

that is true, but the interview is not the place to mention this.

Actualy shouldn't the interview be the place to mention it?

I mean look at us in interviews. We go in maybe dress diferent or comb are are hair the opposit way then spend the time dancing around half truths or avoiding the truths all together.

Wouldn't honest chit chat between two partys to determain if the two are compatable to work together or not be the best and most eficent way to conduct an interview?

This 39 message thread spans 2 pages: 39 ( [1] 2 > >
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