homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.163.72.86
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member

Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: incrediBILL & lawman

Foo Forum

    
To the over 50 crowd: Ever get that nagging deja vu feeling?
I think I told that story before . . . but maybe not . . oh, what the heck
Webwork




msg:294289
 4:32 am on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm loving this business of getting older and older. Hope it keeps on keeping on . . ya know . . getting older.

Lately, when my buddies and I get a chance to shoot the breeze we sometimes find ourselves telling stories that maybe we told each other not so long ago, like maybe a few days ago, something to do with our kids for example.

I can only imagine this will get better with age, kinda of like the couples that finish each other's stories when they're together.

Anyone of you geezermasters and ancient warriors of SEO feeling the age thing coming on? I'm mildly amused by it all. I suspect that's the healthiest approach to the process of decrepitation and demise.

I'm doing everything I can to keep the old brain muscle stimulated and functioning . . but I did misplace my checkbook for the first time ever last week . . and my old lady and me are getting along a little better as time passes 'cause I think we both realize this is as good as it's going to get, so we might as well laugh and make the best of it . .

You?

Hey! You! Youth of the world! You're going to be us, next, so pay close attention. It is inevitible, just like I was never never going to be my parents.

Ya, right, fer shur. :-P

 

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:294290
 8:56 am on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Webwork I am nearer 60 than 50 (OK 57!) and I am beginning to see the signs. For example I often think of something I have to do on the PC while doing something else. I finish off quickly and close down the application then I can't remember what I was about to start!*! How "short term" is that?

Also I often think of something I have to do on the PC while doing something else. I finish off quickly and close down the application then I can't remember what I was about to start!*! How "short term" is that?

I am nearer 60 than 50 and I often think of something I have to do on the PC while doing something else. I finish off quickly and close down the application then I can't remember what I was about to start!*! How "short term" is that?

grandpa




msg:294291
 9:34 am on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

If I've forgotten something, then "it's a secret".

If I'm repeating myself, simply react as if it's the first time you've heard it.

If I forget to do something, I'm still learning how to do my new job.

If you hear my voice, and I didn't address you, I'm talking to myself.

I do all of these things more than I should admit. You know what? ..life is too much fun to care about all the little details ;-)

katana_one




msg:294292
 1:57 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm only 34, and I'm already having trouble remembering who I've told certain stories to. Happened just last night, in fact.

Help me!

DoppyNL




msg:294293
 2:08 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm 24 and I talk to myself out loud on a regular basis when I'm programming.

It can really annoy some people around me, but I don't even notice :).

I wonder what I will be doing when i'm 50....
Perhaps a little to scary to think about... :D

jimbeetle




msg:294294
 2:17 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Talking to yourself out loud is fine, almost normal when you're young and absorbed in a project.

The problems come when that turns into muttering under your breath as you wander the house hitching your stretch-waist, sans-a-belt slacks up to your armpits while trying to figure out why you found your watch in the refrigerator, and attempting to make sense of all the notes scribbled on stickies and scraps of paper stuck in your pockets, but you can't find the one note that you know is important, very important, and can't remember why.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:294295
 3:26 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Three old brothers aged 81, 84 and 86 live in a house together. One night the 86 year old runs a bath. He puts his foot in and pauses then yells to his brothers, "Was I getting in or out of the bath?"

The 84 year old yells back, "I don't know. I'll come up and see."

He starts up the stairs and pauses on the middle landing ... "Was I going up the stairs or down?"

The 81 year old is sitting at the kitchen table having tea listening to the others. He shakes his head and says, "Please God, never let me get that forgetful."

He knocks on wood for good measure.

He then then yells, "I'll come up and help both of you as soon as I see who's at the door."

kevinpate




msg:294296
 3:43 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Not yet fifty, but already a (too frequently) recurring conversation around the home is along
these lines:

Moi: I've never seen this show/movie/sweater/etc.
youngest child: yes you have
Moi: Nope, I don't think I have.
youngest: sheeesh, yes, you have.
elder child: pssst, let it go, cause even if he has, he hasn't.

a Menciaesque "Doot da doo", followed by extreme laughter, usually gets interjected about this point.

AlexK




msg:294297
 6:06 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Webwork:
Anyone of you geezermasters and ancient warriors of SEO feeling the age thing coming on?

Started for me in my 20s (I'm 56 now), and I blame my father.

At 13 in Grammar school I was accepted in to a gang of lads, but there was a problem with my first name ("Brian") since there was already a 'Brian' (hello, Brian Rolfe), so I was called "Alex" (my second name, after my mum's father) and I adopted it ever since. That pleased my mum, but my father never ever called me 'Alex'; he always called me 'Brian'. He still calls me 'Brian', after 43 years! I thought at first that it was stubborness (he is very stubborn) but it is not - he just cannot remember. Worse, I am exactly the same!

On the upside, I am a maniac for very well ordered programming, Classes and extensive comments - how else am I (or anyone else) supposed to remember 6 months later why I did what I did?

DamonHD




msg:294298
 7:47 pm on Mar 30, 2006 (gmt 0)

Hi,

Just coming up to 40 and all my work colleagues know most of my after-dinner/war stories by heart, and even test me on the details... B^>

And the number of digits of PI that I can remember (after the decimal point) has fallen to about 40... Shame, shame.

And I do the extensive commenting thing for exactly the same reason as the previous poster: because no one including me will remember in 3 months the "why". Goodness knows how many times my bacon has been saved by that.

As to the shutting down one app to start another one *right now* to do a quick *very important* thing ... and then realising that you already can't remember what it was ... I've been doing that for nearly 10 years, and find it kinda funny!

As to the shutting down one app to start another one *right now* to do a quick *very important* thing ... and then realising that you already can't remember what it was ... I've been doing that for nearly 10 years, and find it kinda funny!

As to the shutting down one app to start another one *right now* to do a quick *very important* thing ... and then realising that you already can't remember what it was ... I've been doing that for nearly 10 years, and find it kinda funny!

Where was I?

Rgds

Damon

vik_c




msg:294299
 3:42 pm on Mar 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm nowhere near fifty but I remember reading this book by Bill Cosby called 'Time flies' on this subject. He mentions having a conversation with a friend, over coffee. Someone interrupts him. When he's about to resume his conversation, he can't remember what he talking about. He asks his friend but he can't remember either! An excellent book, a humorous take at the ageing process that we all must go through, if we live long enough.

tbear




msg:294300
 6:50 pm on Mar 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

Didn't I just read this thread┐┐┐┐┐

ann




msg:294301
 7:58 pm on Mar 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

Yep, 70 years old and I belong in that club.

I take SOD which helps immensely.

Did I mention I belong in that club? Well I am good at shutting down something because I can't wait to get to.....uh oh....

Ann

rocknbil




msg:294302
 8:49 pm on Mar 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have this theory that it's not failing memory, it's the fact that dynamic people - you know, 90% of us with LIVES - begin to get so much info in our heads it just begins to push other info out on an embarrassing and seemingly random schedule.

I have hundreds of logins and passwords in my head. I do have them written down, most of them, in a safe place, just in case. But I rarely forget any of them.

However, two times in the past month, I've been sitting at the ATM in total shock, for the life of me I could not remember my ATM pin, which has been the same for years.

Now does that suck, or what. :-(

AlexK




msg:294303
 7:16 pm on Apr 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

I believe that part of our memory lives outside of us. Here are just 2 stories that illustrate how I come to that view.

A famous mathematician (cannot recall his name!) walking along one of those long, academic corridors whilst working through a mathematical puzzle in his mind. His mental workings came to a dead-end, and he knew that earlier he had taken a wrong-turning in this mental labyrinth, but could not for the life of him remember the point at which it occurred. He began to retrace his steps (literally), at the same time re-winding the mental journey. Eventually, he reached the point of the wrong-turn. Now, he began to walk forward again, this time taking the different mental-route, and managed to reach a successful conclusion to the puzzle.

The second story is a personal one.

At 4:30pm on Tuesday, 23 February 1999 I discovered that I am prone to Sudden-Death syndrome (got your attention?).

I was sitting on my desk at work whilst giving technical support (via the telephone) for the internet for a recently-launched ISP when my heart began to fibrillate (it later turned out that it can do this upto 10 times a year for short periods). On this occasion it did it for greater than 20 seconds, my brain went unconcious, and I fell back upon the desk. Some 30 or so seconds later, all my muscles went into spasm (lack of oxygen) and--rather like a mobile set to 'vibrate'--I slid off the desk and fell to the floor. Pandemonium ensued!

Although it is not directly relevant to this story, in an attempt to give you a small shock which (who knows?) may save your life, 7 months or so later my team-leader who, unlike me, was in his garden and therefore did not have 2 people trained in first-aid to keep his blood flowing, also fell down unconcious and died. I was 49 when this happened. He was just 29 years old, and recently ex-army. You have been warned.

Afterwards, in the hospital (after release from intensive care) I had no short-term memory, and vast gaps in my long-term memory - clearly the results of an extended period of oxygen-starvation. My son reported that I would repeat entire blocks of conversation, 20 minutes apart, with no knowledge of the repetition. I also could not remember where I worked, where it physically was, nor where I lived. The hospital granted permission for some friends to take me on little journeys and now--having set out the context--we reach the point of this particular story.

The first place they took me was my place of work. The hospital was fairly close, and a workmate had told me the name and pointed through the window in it's direction. With the help of a Yellow-Pages we got to the gates. Passing through them I then knew that we should turn to the left of the building. As I stepped over the threshold of the canteen-door I sensed 'clickety-click' feelings and, in the space of just a few moments, my mind presented me with the entire layout of the building and specifically where I worked within it. Before those moments it was all "here be dragons" to me. An astonishing experience.

The second place was where I lived. On the way there my thoughts were "Hmm, so this is what my neighbourhood looks like - doesn't look too bad". Once again, everything was blank until I found the key, and stepped over the threshold. The same 'clickety-click' feelings and the same presentation of the building's layout. Remember, too, that this is life, and not some academic theory - we are talking memories, and feelings, and attachments stretching back years, all suddenly available in just a moment or two. Most remarkable.

We are far more than just what lives in our head, or even our bodies. We live within a context, within a land and a nation and a country and a planet and a sun and even a galaxy. What we are also includes all of that; it is part of us as much as we are part of it.

lawman




msg:294304
 11:46 pm on Apr 2, 2006 (gmt 0)

Deja vu is usually a glitch in the Matrix. It happens when they change something.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved