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Tools for Building Site for Adsense?
CMS, Blog Script, or Manually handcrafted
shilmy




msg:1398440
 2:05 am on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Hi,

I plan to build site that mostly will have articles on certain topics. The articles will be added from times to times. And I plan to put Adsense on the site.

My questions: What is the best tools to build this particular site that will improve search engine position and maximize adsense revenue?

Regards,
Sjarief

 

eaden




msg:1398441
 2:31 am on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Any CMS ( including blog software ) will work, but you want one that is the most search engine friendly.

So it's best to look around at the various CMSes and look for ones that have SEO features like :

Per page meta descriptions & keywords ( rather than the same meta description and keywords across the whole site )

and

Nice URLS, e.g. www. example.com/pages/my-keywords.html

europeforvisitors




msg:1398442
 3:10 am on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Don't obsess about tools--content, providing "spider food" such as descriptive page titles and headlines, and high-quality inbound links are more important than how you produce your pages.

(I use Microsoft FrontPage, which is "old school" by the standards of the CMS and blogging crowd, and my plain-vanilla HTML pages do very well in all three of the major search engines.)

shilmy




msg:1398443
 3:53 am on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

-----
Don't obsess about tools--content, providing "spider food" such as descriptive page titles and headlines, and high-quality inbound links are more important than how you produce your pages.
-----

I understand, that content is more important, but how do you manage navigation links? Especially when you keep adding new contents? Do you manage the links manually?

Regards,
Sjarief

europeforvisitors




msg:1398444
 4:51 am on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

I understand, that content is more important, but how do you manage navigation links? Especially when you keep adding new contents? Do you manage the links manually?

Yes. That obviously wouldn't be practical if I were running a huge news site, but it works fine for my site (which currently has about 5,000 pages of editorial content).

humblebeginnings




msg:1398445
 8:59 pm on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

For a new site, I am experimenting with Wordpress.
Looks fine to me. Fast publishing, automated management of link structure, and good url's like www.yourdomain.com/your-keyword/your-keyword.html.

europeforvisitors




msg:1398446
 9:57 pm on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Is it readily portable? That would be my biggest worry when dealing with a proprietary and/or hosted publishing system.

eaden




msg:1398447
 10:23 pm on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Is it readily portable? That would be my biggest worry when dealing with a proprietary and/or hosted publishing system.

Wordpress is neither..

Personally, I think that handcrafted is best ( inc. handcrafted mini-cms), but only if you can do it quickly, and well. In many cases a CMS will help if you have a very large site.

stella_kl




msg:1398448
 10:34 pm on Oct 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Europeforvisitors - has anyone scraped content from your site?

What I am saying is that after havng had a good sniff around your site I reckon it would n't be too hard to make guidetoeurope dot whatever - if you get my meaning?

Of course I am not suggesting for one minute that it is a good idea, not for the white hats among us anyway (if there are any?)

TampaLou




msg:1398449
 9:49 pm on Oct 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

Server-side includes are nice if you have hundreds (or thousands) of pages of content. In particular with AdSense ads, using it has come in handy for me on more than one instance. And I've found that the search engines find .shtml files just as easy as their .html counterparts.

Avoid flash pages or those with minimal text content. If the spiders can't see it, the search engines can't find it...

david_uk




msg:1398450
 10:25 pm on Oct 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

I think it depends on how much updating is going to be done to the site. The templates I use for my site were written using a basic text editor (notepad pro), but I use Front Page to do tables. I also have some .asp pages that are database driven written using notepad pro again.

I think the keys are good design, and that can be done in any package and above all, content that visitors will want to read and return to. If you are planning on regular updates, then manually managing the links isn't too much of a problem as long as the site is logically structured. Whatever package you use for creating the page is rather less important than what you actually say on it!

I'm not sure that any particular package makes the page earn you more - I think that's down to the design and content of the site, and how you promote it.

nubbin




msg:1398451
 11:55 pm on Oct 31, 2005 (gmt 0)

I recommend you take a look at Drupal, Mambo and Wordpress.

My main site is hand crafted in Dreamweaver using a combo of templates and php includes to format and manage content. It has a few thousand pages. It's fairly manageable, but I've got to make sure I hand craft the pages in a SE friendly way, not something I always manage to remember. I'm planning on building more sites soon so I've been looking increasing my productivity. At first I thought I would write my own CMS in php/mysql, but then thought "why reinvent the wheel" so have been considering using CMS/blog software like Drupal, Wordpress and Mambo for building my contents sites. These are are all free and open source.

At the moment, Wordpress is my preference. It's seems easy to change look and feel, you can easily add content,blogs, and things like surveys and I understand it produces SE friendly code and pages. From what I've read Drupal is good but sounds more complicated to install and configure.

But, overall I'm not convinced if spending time learning how to get the best out of these CMS systems is worth it for sites which are relatively small or mostly static content.

Any other views?

Tropical Island




msg:1398452
 12:48 am on Nov 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

(I use Microsoft FrontPage, which is "old school" by the standards of the CMS and blogging crowd, and my plain-vanilla HTML pages do very well in all three of the major search engines.)

I also use FP and our sites are all highly indexed. I use the KISS principal - keep it simple, stupid. Works for me.

astro_miner




msg:1398453
 1:27 am on Nov 1, 2005 (gmt 0)

If you are planning on building a very large site you should probably use a CMS.

As someone said earlier, get one that lets you specify per-page meta-tags, titles and maybe even nav links. It should have the option to enter a separate intro text for the article to display on the front page instead of just taking the first sentences of the article itself.

Use mod_rewrite.

Also, make sure you get one that does not in any way, shape or form generate duplicate content. Most of them do.

I resorted to writing my own to get all the features I wanted.

One thing to take into consideration too: sites running premade cms usually get the "get your own blog" type adsense ads. Make sure to remove any reference to the word blog and the name of the CMS. If you want to be nice and keep the link to the CMS creators site maybe put some section targeting ignore tags around the link.

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