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This 32 message thread spans 2 pages: 32 ( [1] 2 > >     
Warning -- Never ever give out your website address to anyone you know
Based on experience of being banned once
serengeti




msg:1360572
 3:28 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

After seeing another thread of someone being banned, let me warn everyone that it is never a good idea to give your website address to anyone you know.

I was banned after I gave my web address to a friend of mine to check out my site (for grammer and content and layout feedback) who clicked on the ads around 10 times spread among different pages. I got reinstated because there were just a few clicks and they didn't come from my city so Adsense believed my innocence. I think they thought the clicks were illegal because very few people were visiting my site at the time.

Anyway, I also told a couple of people at work about my site and then I found out that all the computers at my workplace have the same IP address. So now I am concerned that if these guys at work click on my ads, I could get banned since I access my adsense account from my work computer (same or very similar IP).

Anyway, I told these workmates of mine to never visit my site again, but now I have to hope that these guys will never feel the urge to visit my site or click on the ads. I also have to make sure I never get into a fight with them or they can blackmail me!

Moral = Just keep your site address to yourself and anonymous users. Keep family and friends and acquaintances out of the picture completely.

 

Tearabite




msg:1360573
 3:44 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

You're right.
me, and probably most others here would agree.

where i work we have over 10,000 employees that ALL go thru one firewall (a cluster, actually) but all with the same IP.. i blocked that IP just on the off-chance that 1 or 2 of the 10,000 might randomly stumble across my site and click an ad.

jetteroheller




msg:1360574
 3:47 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Anyway, I also told a couple of people at work about my site and then I found out that all the computers at my workplace have the same IP address. So now I am concerned that if these guys at work click on my ads, I could get banned since I access my adsense account from my work computer (same or very similar IP).

I thought only to write an article about a company, but instead as a journalist, I ended as a internet promotion trainer at this company, delivering my seminar about web promotion.

Since the company is involved in the same business area as the main theme of my site, I put his fixed IP address in the "show Amazon ads instead of AdSense" list of my SSI for ad delivery.

GoldenHammer




msg:1360575
 4:15 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I intended to believe that Google is further more smarter than we can expect to identify those "invalid clicks".

In particular, I will not be surprised that Google may have some specific ad serving pattern applied to the websites under their investigation and see how it responds on the impression and clicks etc in order to identify "invalid clicks".

GoldenHammer




msg:1360576
 4:21 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

The more important advice is:

Never believe yourself is smarter than the AS program nor can fool those * REALLY SMARTER * Google tech. people behind.... :P

ronburk




msg:1360577
 4:46 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

10,000 employees that ALL go thru one firewall (a cluster, actually) but all with the same IP

Then Google is extremely well aware that that IP address is multiplexed (although, I'm a little dubious that all 10,000 are actually sharing a single IP address -- try getting everyone to surf at 12:00 noon one day and see if the NAT software crashes :-).

That's even too paranoid for me. If you worked at AOL, would you block all external AOL IP addresses? :-)

toldan




msg:1360578
 5:11 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

After seeing another thread of someone being banned, let me warn everyone that it is never a good idea to give your website address to anyone you know.

I was banned after I gave my web address to a friend of mine to check out my site (for grammer and content and layout feedback) who clicked on the ads around 10 times spread among different pages. I got reinstated because there were just a few clicks and they didn't come from my city so Adsense believed my innocence. I think they thought the clicks were illegal because very few people were visiting my site at the time.

Don't give your address to anyone, not even your co-workers. I was once asked my a co-worker what's my websites, and I told her: "Sorry, I can't give it to you".

toldan




msg:1360579
 5:11 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

PS: sorry for typing errors, my keyboard is sticky.

Green_Grass




msg:1360580
 7:14 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I run an e- commerce site .. How can I not give my website address to 10,000 potential customers?

Should I now stop selling my product, and concentrate only on adsense and start visiting a psychiatrist ... ( for paranoia , you see...)

jetteroheller




msg:1360581
 7:25 am on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I run an e- commerce site .. How can I not give my website address to 10,000 potential customers?

When I accredit as a journalist at a fair, they gave me alwas a card with my name and my web site address and I have to wear this cars visible while I visit the fair.

When I make an interview, I can not tell, that I want a interview, but the media remains anonym.

PowerUp




msg:1360582
 1:00 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Don't tell anyone your website URL. If you must share with someone, then tell your parrot but only if your parrot doesn't know how to repeat after you.

Green_Grass




msg:1360583
 1:05 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

What kind of advice is that?

Misleading stuff...

You may not tell your close friends or family what you do ( as you seem to be in the bad books of everyone ;-) ) but everyone is welcome to the web..

slade7




msg:1360584
 1:50 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have a great many friends and acquaintances who visit and use my site every day. I mean people that I talk to regularly by email and phone and so forth. Some of these people I know mainly because I run the site, so this seems a little ridiculous to me. There's no way for me to keep people in the niche I'm in from knowing that I run the site.

Anyway, I do ok with adsense - never a problem, but my site doesn't exist to serve adsense, and if they booted me I would still operate the site and it would still continue to grow. If they wanted out I would tend to see that as their loss.

Roadkill




msg:1360585
 2:00 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I dont think you need to be that paranoid. My site started localy and I advertise local and abroad. I know there is a good amount of people from my local area visiting the site frequently and I have never had a problem.

Where problems begin is when people just click on ads for the sake of clicking to help you or your site.

When people ask if I make any money, I just say not really :) If they ask how I make money, I say its by renting ad space and I only make a little and only if they buy something. Keeps people honest.

adamxcl




msg:1360586
 4:17 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

It is ironic that I sometimes feel that I'm better off not telling people what website I run. I've told family and friends and then later I fear them doing something they shouldn't like clicking on ads. Even when I thought I explained the clicking situation pretty good, they still don't seem to get it. They just hear that you make money on them...so I don't know if it's better to say something or not.

On a side note to this, has anyone felt that it almost could be a deterrent to people using your website and giving you money? I sometimes think that the person would be more likely to use the website if they didn't know it was me. They may think, "I like him but I'm not giving him my credit card number. He's just a nice guy running a business out of his house. How safe can that be. I want to deal with a big faceless company that is a stranger to me."

Matt Probert




msg:1360587
 4:52 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Indeed taking this nonsense even further, don't ever allow ANYONE to access your web site incase they click on your Adsense (all hail the glorious Adsense, saviour of the universe) adverts numerous times and you lose your Adsense account....

Matt

LifeinAsia




msg:1360588
 4:59 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Better advice- NEVER put AdSense on any of your pages! Then you don't ever have to worry about people clicking on your ads.

Also, NEVER put any content on your site, because someone might come and scrape it.

Rodney




msg:1360589
 6:16 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

I run an e- commerce site .. How can I not give my website address to 10,000 potential customers?

Should I now stop selling my product, and concentrate only on adsense and start visiting a psychiatrist

If you run an ecommerce website, adsense may not be the best fit for you.

As a customer, if I see adsense on an ecommerce website, it makes me think the merchant doesn't have enough confidence in their product or that they aren't really serious about their business (almost like if they were trying to run ecommerce off a free webhost with no domain name of their own).

As a merchant, I would be worried about "leaks" like adsense, which would undoubtedly have a negative effect on my conversion ratio. If people click to ads, they aren't buying my products.

Back on the topic though, I don't know if it's a good idea to hide your website address from people you know. Seems to go against the whole idea of word of mouth marketing. It's natural to talk about your business if you're passionate about what you do.

Eazygoin




msg:1360590
 6:24 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

As a customer, if I see adsense on an ecommerce website, it makes me think the merchant doesn't have enough confidence in their product or that they aren't really serious about their business (almost like if they were trying to run ecommerce off a free webhost with no domain name of their own).

As there are many different types of ecommerce websites. For example, there are those that selltheir own products, there are affilates, there are those who run clssifieds sites,and have no input as to the products advertised. There are also free ecommerce sites, to advertise products, and the earnings purely come from external advertising.

Advice is always appreciated in these forums, but can sometimes lead to misinterpretation and misinformation:-)

[edited by: jatar_k at 8:26 pm (utc) on May 18, 2006]

gregbo




msg:1360591
 8:57 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

Then Google is extremely well aware that that IP address is multiplexed (although, I'm a little dubious that all 10,000 are actually sharing a single IP address -- try getting everyone to surf at 12:00 noon one day and see if the NAT software crashes :-).

I think it's quite likely that there is one IP address on the external firewall interface that's presented to the provider network. 10,000 addresses is not a big deal. In fact a robust NAT implementation should be able to handle 10,000 connections.

Rodney




msg:1360592
 9:29 pm on May 18, 2006 (gmt 0)

As there are many different types of ecommerce websites. For example, there are those that selltheir own products, there are affilates, there are those who run clssifieds sites,and have no input as to the products advertised. There are also free ecommerce sites, to advertise products, and the earnings purely come from external advertising.

To clarify, I am only talking about an ecommerce site in the strictest sense (ie: a merchant selling their own products through their own online store).

I don't consider an affiliate site, or a classifieds site, or a site where you advertise your products, an ecommerce site.

Green_Grass




msg:1360593
 3:13 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Rodney..

Off the topic .. My E commerce site is in a very specific niche and the ads that get displayed pertain to the broad category.. It is actually a perfect fit.. When , customers don't get and want what I offer,... they move out using adsense..

Makes me some free money..

northaqua




msg:1360594
 4:52 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

I offline advertise my website, by way of press, word of mouth and viral friend marketing. I also get near 60% of my visitors from search engines.

That leaves near 40% of visitors that come from viral marketing. I would be a fool to cut out viral marketing.

I don't advertize or tell friends asking people to click ads on my site, that would be crazy and can only lead to a false sense of security.

The fact is that local people visit my site. If you hit the search on keywords. locals will get me, because I rank high on the engines, yet 40% of my traffic comes from offline advetising?

When surfers visit my site there it is a record rather it's from of direct input called a "non referer" (direct browser input) in my case. That accounts some days over 40% of my traffic.
The stats tell me that offline is giving traffic. Even my Awstats tracking shows that.

Folks visit my site for the content. If they don't like it or bookmark it and come for the content, then hit the back button. Simple most people like my content.

The internet is driven by viral marketing, google was built with viral marketing. From a back room search engine to become the # 1 search engine.

That was only made possible by a peep telling another that he/she liked it.

If google don't like my site because friends tell each other then I'll drop adsense! Period!

Rather anyone likes it or not

It is a fact that people friend or foe will visit a site, because someone asked them.

Don't ask people to visit your site to click on a paid link! If that is the only reason you get people to reapeat a visit, then you need to be canned.

However, If some advertiser on my site tells me that I am not going to get paid from hits made possible by offline advertising without explaining it.

Then good bye advertiser.

I will never ask someone to click a sponsored link to support me. I don't need that headache.

I run ad's fair and simple. As an advertizer you get a click or you don't.

Adsense is a resonable sponsor, I tend to think that they may agree with my opinion of that.

They haven't done wrong to me yet. I have my issues of smart pricing and stats going crazy.

Those will get looked after.

If you site survives on adsense alone "don't tell friends about it"

But if you have a website that means something about you or your business "then tell friends" about it and get it ranked in a viral marketing sense and in the engines.

If you have a sponsor then don't tell your friends to click ads. But tell them come see your site.
There is a difference.
Traffic is more important to you than a click on and link. Think about it.

Most of my repeat visitors come from viral maketing. They get something worthwhile from the visit.
I shoot for the fact that my site is better than the ads it shows, otherwise they wouldn't be advertising!

[edited by: northaqua at 5:13 am (utc) on May 19, 2006]

martinibuster




msg:1360595
 4:59 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Indeed taking this nonsense even further, don't ever allow ANYONE to access your web site incase they click on your Adsense...

Not nonesense, not really. There are many well meaning family members who may feel they are helping you by clicking your ads. Not nonesense at all. Totally within the realm of something that can happen.

It's easy to tell people you are an internet publisher, like a magazine publisher. But that your magazine is published on the internet, and people pay you to place advertisements. People can understand that.

My wife has a friend who published a cookbook recently. Her father purchased 100, 300 or 500 copies from the local bookstores (can't recall the exact numbers, wife told me the story couple months ago when it happened) and the next week her book was listed in the top ten books for Denver, Colorado. If a father is willing to spend $2,000, 6,000-$10,000 to help promote her daughter, I think clicking a little ad is within the realm of possibilities.

northaqua




msg:1360596
 5:26 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

If he finds something interesting on your site, and if you worry, then tell him how to turn off ad's from java script

Some folks take this to far and some don't.

If a person hits my site they expect a certain thing or a theme if they hit my links by chance, then it's the same thing, they click they like or they don't.

Most pdf my links are content pure and on a thanks basis

webdudek




msg:1360597
 7:47 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

serengeti,
you can block the IP address of your workplace from accessing your site. or at least not show ads for this address.
This way you won't have to worry about your workmates.

dhiggerdhigger




msg:1360598
 8:08 am on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Here's how to block a particular address range (e.g. your workplace, etc), in php:

[webmasterworld.com...]

carepecare




msg:1360599
 3:23 pm on May 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Conclusion: if you don't have a local, viral marketing dependent site, don't tell your friends about it

Green_Grass




msg:1360600
 4:49 am on May 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

"
Conclusion: if you don't have a local, viral marketing dependent site, don't tell your friends about it "

Yes.. if the site is dependent only upon adsense and has nothing else to it .. better play safe and stay secretive ...

joeduck




msg:1360601
 4:57 am on May 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Bad news for Brett and GoogleGuy - the've both given out the name of their websites!

This 32 message thread spans 2 pages: 32 ( [1] 2 > >
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