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Myth about US traffic
toldan




msg:1359745
 11:13 pm on Apr 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you think that you will earn more money with US traffic, you are wrong. My website has only 10% US traffic, even less Canadian traffic. Most of my traffic is international. I have people coming to my site all over the world, you name the country, I'll find it in my webstats.

The topic of my website is simply targeted at anyone, and it's only natural to have people all over the planet visit my site.

My average pay per click is very high, don't ask, I won't tell you how much (don't wanna break Adsense TOS). But, it's high!

Now, if you think that Google and advertisers pay the biggest bucks for US traffic - then you should think again.

 

europeforvisitors




msg:1359775
 4:31 pm on Apr 23, 2006 (gmt 0)

Anyways, the reference by AdsenseProfiteer was about Indians and Chinese not making purchase off the internet, which hits smartpricing, and when this continues publishers get banned because Google suspects them of frauding.

I think it's also important to remember that Google can terminate publishers for "invalid clicks," not just for "fraudulent clicks." So it's quite possible that--for example--a site about travel to Avignon, France that habitually got 30% of its clicks from the publisher's home grounds in India, China, or the U.S. state of Utah might be regarded as having "invalid clicks" whether or not fraud could be proven.

It's equally possible that some countries produce more invalid clicks than others do, just as it's known that some countries produce or relay more e-mail spam than others do. Google may well have a scoring mechanism that takes such factors into account--not in isolation, but as a broader click-monitoring mechanism that flags questionable accounts for manual review.

activeco




msg:1359776
 12:53 am on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's equally possible that some countries produce more invalid clicks than others do, just as it's known that some countries produce or relay more e-mail spam than others do.

While this is true, it is very difficult to find out the real specifics.
Relays and spoofing are now a standard among e-mail spammers.
Spyware and stealware, although mainly benefiting US companies is very often spread through throw-away domains (and local servers) registered in Asia or Eastern Europe, for deceiving purposes.
E.g. FindWhat has been supposedly using spyware for PPC hijack, which points to .la (Lao People's Democratic Republic) domains/servers, but then, after several redirects coming back to FindWhat/DoubleClick.
Some analysts were fast in concluding that the fraud is coming from "unscrupulous rogue affiliates abusing the system", but anyone following the redirects could see the real story.

In conclusion, IP tracking and geo analysis of spam/fraud is completely senseless today.

toldan




msg:1359777
 2:37 am on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

Regarding claims against India. Even if these click factories do exist, they have nothing to do with me. I don't pay anyone to click on my ads. People of India have no personal financial benefit of clicking on my ads. Indian traffic is not my major traffic.

anand84




msg:1359778
 5:13 am on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

Exactly Toldan..thats why I want people to get back to what your point in starting this thread was. I give up.

david_uk




msg:1359779
 5:58 am on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

Yes, this thread did rather wander off track. I think your original point was that there are markets outside the USA, and if your site is aimed at them then they can, and do pay well. Also that sites aimed at an international audience do well.

My site is aimed at an international audience, and although a large percentage of visitors (about 66%) are from the US, when I've been monitoring clicks with a tracker I've found that the clicks I get from the UK and other key countries pay as well as US ones do.

andrea99




msg:1359780
 6:52 am on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

I hadn't heard this myth until it was posed in this thread. I never thought clicks from one region would pay more than another.

I can see why they would be more numerous and would convert better from a more affluent area. The more affluent area would click on higher ticket items yielding a bigger eCPM.

Comcast just changed my IP to a number that is in New Jersey and when I get locally targeted ads they are for businesses that are 2000 miles away... Is Comcast mad at Google?

david_uk




msg:1359781
 4:18 pm on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

To me, it's logical that a site targeted at a specific region, showing adverts appropriate to, or targeted at that region, if the clicks convert there is no reason that the clicks shouldnt pay well. Shouldn't matter if that region is France, UK, US - wherever.

The EU had the biggest GDP in 2005, so there are clearly opportunities there, as well as a lot of other countries outside the US. Providing advertising to an established user / customer base is effective, then it is going to pay both the advertiser and publisher well, as it works for both. Google know this and aren't going to pass up the opportunity to maximise their profit from this just because it's not American advertisers, or American visitors. The population of the US is only 3% of the planet after all. There are a *lot* of opportunities to be had elsewhere.

I think the myth isn't that US traffic doesn't pay, because it does. The myth is that traffic outside the US doesn't pay as well, or sometimes better.

BillyS




msg:1359782
 5:25 pm on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm still not sure where the myth came from and how this has been addressed in any manner other than one person's experience.

In fact, based on this particular comment:

>>My website has only 10% US traffic, even less Canadian traffic.

And other statements from Toldan about his/her website (only in English). I'd say that Toldan found more of a niche opportunity and should be considered the exception rather than the rule.

I've dealt with several "international" products and we priced our PPC campaigns based on several factors, none of which had anything to do with where the clicker was located. Based on the competition, I didn't observe this "myth" anywhere.

gregbo




msg:1359783
 8:08 pm on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

Comcast just changed my IP to a number that is in New Jersey and when I get locally targeted ads they are for businesses that are 2000 miles away... Is Comcast mad at Google?

This is a good example of how geotargeting can be unreliable. IP addresses were never meant to be tied to location. A company can reallocate its IP address blocks if it needs to, or companies can change ownership causing IP addresses to be reassigned. Many other scenarios are possible.

europeforvisitors




msg:1359784
 9:33 pm on Apr 24, 2006 (gmt 0)

IP addresses were never meant to be tied to location. A company can reallocate its IP address blocks if it needs to, or companies can change ownership causing IP addresses to be reassigned. Many other scenarios are possible.

My Web stats package (Mach5 FastStats Gold) doesn't even try to guess location in most cases. Under the entry for user countries, about 70% of user locations are "unknown."

However, I've learned a lot about the origins of my traffic--or at least the ones who book through affiliate links--since my main hotel affiliate partner started listing "user country" (presumably derived from booking or credit-card information) in its stats. On average, U.S./Canada residents are less than half of total bookings, with UK residents averaging somewhere around 25%. The remaining 25-30% come from all over the place, sometimes including countries that I've barely heard of and can't remember how to spell.

As a middle-aged geezer who can remember how exotic it once was to communicate by shortwave radio across the ocean, being able to reach readers in 100+ countries per month is pretty neat! The Web truly is global, even if a lot of big businesses and institutions (including some of the national tourist offices that I deal with) have been slow to figure that out.

danimal




msg:1359785
 12:32 am on Apr 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

>>>Yahoo! still is very strict about non-US traffic because US traffic is the best in terms of monetisation.<<<

no, yahoo is very strict about non-us traffic because most of it's advertisers are u.s.-based... if my products are targeted to americans, why would i want to pay to advertise internationally?

then tell us if adwords keywords are cheaper than yahoo keyword advertising.

>>>My Web stats package (Mach5 FastStats Gold) doesn't even try to guess location in most cases. Under the entry for user countries, about 70% of user locations are "unknown."<<<

that doesn't prove anything... if i had to guess, i'd say that your stats program isn't set up to do current lookups on i.p. addresses, because it takes a lot of time and bandwidth.

it is possible to set up a real-time country lookup for your website, it just takes a tiny bit of code on every page.

by comparison, some geotargeting software claims accuracy of ~97%, based largely on i.p. addresses... minus things like certain aol i.p. blocks, of course.

europeforvisitors




msg:1359786
 1:40 am on Apr 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

that doesn't prove anything... if i had to guess, i'd say that your stats program isn't set up to do current lookups on i.p. addresses, because it takes a lot of time and bandwidth.

I've occasionally set it to do lookups on IP addresses, but the reports haven't been very detailed. (Certainly not worth the time and bandwidth.)

At any rate, that really isn't the point. What matters is that the Web is global, and many of us can vouch for the fact that non-U.S. users can generate significant profits for Web sites.

martinibuster




msg:1359787
 1:56 am on Apr 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think your original point was that there are markets outside the USA, and if your site is aimed at them then they can, and do pay well.

You wouldn't know it from the title of this thread.

;)

gregbo




msg:1359788
 9:33 pm on Apr 25, 2006 (gmt 0)

by comparison, some geotargeting software claims accuracy of ~97%, based largely on i.p. addresses... minus things like certain aol i.p. blocks, of course.

I wonder how these numbers were arrived at. Were controlled experiments done with properly sized samples of individuals from many countries accessing sites?

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