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Google AdSense Forum

    
how can i find out what ads are clicked?
i have some "bad" ads i want gone but maybe they bring me cash so then i do
Billy_Blue



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 5:03 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

nt want them to be gone.

can i check what ads are being clicked?!?!

 

wheelie34

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 6:07 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Dont keep checking what ads are displayed on your site, you will be eating up valuable bandwidth!

Theres a few scripts available discussed around this forum, heres a thread on the subject youre asking about, search is your friend.

[webmasterworld.com...]

Couldnt resist the first bit, just read your other thread.

david_uk

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 6:11 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are various trackers available, but to be honest I have doubts they are going to help. In the main, because trackers won't tell you how much each ad pays, and that is implicit in your question.

Blocking ads as you think they may be low payers is a pure lottery, and you may well find your overall earnings decrease.

Many of us block ads for various sensible reasons, but guessing what is, or isn't a low payer is not a sensible reason. The same ad will pay different rates depending on how smart pricing views it's likelihood of conversion based on all sorts of criteria. If you knew an ad had just paid you 1c and then blocked it, you could be using out big time as it may well pay a lot more at a different time of day, and different location of visitor and so on.

The ads I block are ebay, and all persistent MFA's I see on my site. In part because scummy ads reflect badly on the website publisher, and in part because I don't see how a scummy old scraper can earn me more than a real advertiser with something to sell.

Billy_Blue



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 8:22 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

i cant believe adsense doesnt let you see this!

david_uk

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 8:57 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

What stats would you like to see?

Earnings per click is never going to be a constant, so in many ways that's not useful.

If we are all honest, we want to see the maximum income from our sites. With Adsense / Adwords, the whole thing is extremely complex. Therefore in many cases to maximise income we pretty well have to leave it to Google. Therefore I suppose you could argue that we don't need elaborate statistics!

My personal view is that Adsense reporting could be improved, and the improvements would feed into better returns for Google and us.

EG, I've been using one of the trackers, and it tells me who the major advertisers are and where the visitors that click the ads are from. I can use that information to make the site have slightly more relevance to both visitors and advertisters - now I know who the advertisers who do the most business with me are!

Simple information that should be made available to webmasters for the good of all. Information that is easily available, and not prohibited by the TOS. I emailed Google to ask them.

jonathanleger

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 10:23 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Google probably feels it's not in their own interest to show you 1) which ads are getting clicked and 2) how much, on average, those clicks are earning.

Why? Think about this: once you know what the top earning ads are, what prevents you from going and signing up for that site's affiliate program? You could then put the affiliate links on those pages, pretty confident that it will generate sales, and earn more by cutting Google out of the middle.

Why confident of sales? Because if the advertiser has remained on your site, and Google's algo is supposed to keep the best performing ads on the pages, then chances are good that those products are selling well through your page.

Personally, I think this is one of the best reasons to own a set of tracking scripts, as long as those scripts give you the ads that were clicked.

This does not always work. I tried it on one site in particular, and it did generate sales, but not as much as the combined revenue from all of the AdSense ads in the block (back before we could have multiple blocks on one page). But in the cases where it doesn't work, just put the AdSense back!

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 11:21 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Why do you want the ads gone that people are clicking on, paying you too much money?

You're better off banishing ads people DON'T click.

What a concept.

jonathanleger

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 11:36 pm on Jan 19, 2006 (gmt 0)

Did you read my post? You can make -more- but cutting out the middle man.

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 12:23 am on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Yes, I read your post and I don't condone violating AdSense TOS

jonathanleger

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 6:38 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

And how, may I ask, is it a breech of the TOS if you sign up for a good advertiser's affiliate program?

If you're talking about this:

Communications Solely With Google. You agree to direct to Google, and not to any advertiser, any communication regarding any Ad(s) or Link(s) displayed in connection with Your Site(s).

It doesn't apply. I'm not contacting the advertiser about his ad on my site, I'm signing up for his affilite program. Chances are I'll never contact them at all, since they probably have an automated form for me to sign up with.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 6:57 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Think about this: once you know what the top earning ads are, what prevents you from going and signing up for that site's affiliate program? You could then put the affiliate links on those pages, pretty confident that it will generate sales, and earn more by cutting Google out of the middle.

There are a couple of problems with that argument:

1) The advertiser may not have an affiliate program. (Many, if not most, advertisers don't.)

2) Even if the advertiser does have an affiliate program, the publisher may not want to trade guaranteed AdSense revenues for revenues from an affiliate program that may or may not materialize or that may be slow in coming.

We also hear arguments that publishers should cut out the middleman and sell ads directly to AdSense advertisers. There are problems with that argument, too:

1) The publisher may not be able to deliver enough impressions to interest the advertiser, especially if the advertiser is looking for highly targeted referral traffic (which is likely to be the case if the advertiser has chosen AdWords/AdSense).

2) Not all advertisers want to buy ads directly from publishers, even if the ads are targeted. They prefer the automation and flexibility that they get when they buy ads from an aggregator like Google. (Plus, they may trust Google more than they trust an unknown publisher.)

3) Not all publishers want to take on the hassle of selling ads, especially it's so seasy to slap AdSense code in their page margins and "make money while they sleep."

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 7:01 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Not all publishers want to take on the hassle of selling ads,

It's not a hassle if you deploy an automated solution.

If you can't deploy your own solution, AdBrite works and you get 75% of the loot.

The only thing missing in AdBrite is competitive bidding but you also don't have smart pricing so it's a wash IMO.

FYI, I'm running an ad campaign at the moment on just Google Search, not the content network, and it's not charging me the full price for any clicks so they appear to smart price everything and not just the content network.

elsewhen

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 7:14 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

FYI, I'm running an ad campaign at the moment on just Google Search, not the content network, and it's not charging me the full price for any clicks so they appear to smart price everything and not just the content network.

i think that is the adwords ad discounter, not smartpricing:

[adwords.google.com...]

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 8:02 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Probably, but the net result is the same in that ads are being discounted regardless so in my mind at least it eases a little of the smart pricing hysteria as it could just be discounted based on other available ads on the same page as well as the site performance.

The downside is a crappy site has no hope.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 8:24 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's not a hassle if you deploy an automated solution.

I have yet to hear of an automated solution that identifies, contacts, and pitches potential advertisers.

I can see why some publishers might want to sell text ads directly to advertisers, but for many of us--especially those of us with editorially diverse sites--it makes a lot more sense to use a value-added aggregator like Google. The same goes for display ads: I work with a specialized ad network in New York (it's really as much a rep firm as an ad network) that brings in campaigns for national tourist offices, airlines, cruise lines, and other major advertisers. I'd never be able to make those ad sales myself, because (a) I don't have the contacts; (b) I don't have the time; (c) I'm not in a position, geographically or otherwise, to take New York media buyers to lunch and talk to them in Mediaspeak; and (c) most of the advertisers want to spread their impressions over more than one site.

There's a reason why ad networks and rep firms exist: They're specialists who know more about selling and serving ads than the average publisher does.

incrediBILL

WebmasterWorld Administrator incredibill us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 10:03 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have yet to hear of an automated solution that identifies, contacts, and pitches potential advertisers

Don't need to contact them because if your site is really popular they will find you and I have advertisers from all over the world, not just the US.

That's why I have subtle links under all my sponsored ads "Advertise Here..." as people stumble across those links they swipe their credit card and up the ads go, plus a full page on advertising and an ecommerce page to let them pick the ad package and purchase online.

AdSense does ad to the mix but the sponsored links perform very well and I get all of the money less credit card processing transaction fees and the money is in the bank 3 days later - very civilized ;)

EVOrange

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 10:29 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

And some of us are just to dang lazy to want to deal with advertisers. In my niche, I would have to hold their hand no matter how "idiot proof" the system was. 9.9 out of ten of the "professionals" in my "widgets" are as computer illiterate as they come.
Google rule in my book.

EVO

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 10:38 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Don't need to contact them because if your site is really popular they will find you and I have advertisers from all over the world, not just the US.

I get about half a million visitors a month from all over the world, but that doesn't mean:

1) A travel agency selling Elbonian kayak cruises to UK residents is going to find an Elbonian kayak-cruise page on my site and want to buy an ad on that page, or...

2) I'm going to want to spend time discussing ad rates with a UK kayak-cruising agency, collecting payment, and setting up an ad to reach a geotargeted audience on that one page of my 5,000+-page site.

It's far more efficient for the travel agency and for me to let Google be the intermediary and aggregator.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 11:07 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Oh, and here's another scenario:

I finish a 20-page guide to Widgetburg, Elbonia and publish it this afternoon. Almost instantly, that content is being monetized by targeted (including geotargeted) AdSense ads for hotels, tours, or whatever ads Google might have in inventory for Widgetburg or Elbonia. That's a lot easier and more profitable for me than trying to line up advertisers who market services for travelers to Widgetburg.

Let's face it: If AdSense didn't offer value to publishers, you wouldn't be seeing publishers using it (including publishers who have their their own very large advertising-sales departments).

jonathanleger

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 11:24 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

1) The advertiser may not have an affiliate program. (Many, if not most, advertisers don't.)

2) Even if the advertiser does have an affiliate program, the publisher may not want to trade guaranteed AdSense revenues for revenues from an affiliate program that may or may not materialize or that may be slow in coming.

Those are true statements. That's why it pays to do the research to see if 1) they have an affiliate program, and 2) if they do, to test it out and see if it makes you more money.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 11634 posted 11:27 pm on Jan 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Also, AdSense and affiliate programs aren't mutually exclusive. Some of us use both (and do well with each).

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