homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.237.98.229
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member
Home / Forums Index / Google / Google AdWords
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: buckworks & eWhisper & skibum

Google AdWords Forum

    
Regional Targeting for National Advertisers
is it worthwhile?
Number22

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 12:03 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Hi Guys,

Ive seen the comments about regional targeting for regional advertisers on Google.

This makes complete sense for all (both the consumer and the service provider) as there is no real point in showing a local service ad to someone who cant use it.

However, im wondering about your thoughts on a slightly larger scale form of regional advertising.

**apologies in advance for the generic detail below as the information is sensetive**

We have a huge national user who has a number of "bases" (10+) throughout the country. We currently cover them through a fairly generic campaign that covers the nation - there is no concept of regionality in terms of keywords or ad-copy.

Would a regionally targeted campaign be of use here?

All of the "bases" for this user supplies different levels of service from each of the bases - thus you may be able to get something from base 1 but not from base 2 or 3.

I understand that regional CPC's will be higher and we'd obviosuly loose any previous quality scores that have been built up in the current campaign. Also, the campaign structre is quite interesting - with a national generic campaign and then however many regional campaigns.

If there is a term in the regional campaign and in the generic national campaign, which CPC would be selected?

Has anyone implemeted regional targeting on this scale and how has it affected you guys? are you getting better quality clicks, experiencing higher CPCs? All-in-all, was it worth it?!

It would be interesting to discuss this!

-22-

 

beren

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 2:14 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Welcome to Webmasterworld.

I've been thinking recently about the same idea - running regional ads (within the US) in an account that has been national. It's possible that click-through rates would be higher if people see the name of their city/state in the ad text. You could also track the conversion rate from different regions, and that information could be useful. It would be harder to manage the account, but may be worth it.

Interested if anyone else has done it and wants to share.

Number22

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 2:25 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Hi Beren

Thanks for the welcome! I think ill be around more and more!

For the example in question, we have, in addition to the national campaign, done a small test in jsut 1 region.

Yes, it is interesting to see where the revenue has come from, but we are definately experiencing higher-than-average CPC's - what i mean here is that the CPC's for the regional campaign are, on average, higher than those of the national campaign.

The campaign structures are almost identical in terms of ad-groups, keyowrds, branded terms etc - the main difference being the copy-text and some of the more region-specific keywords.

The suggestions and tech-specs all came direct from Google - as did the warnings of higher CPC's.

Would love to hear anyones thoughts!

Thanks

-22-

Frequent

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 2:35 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

I would recommend you keep the national campaign, add regional keword combos to that, AND add the regional campaigns with specific geotargeting and the exact same keyword set. Rest assured the regional campaigns should outperform the national and eventually cost LESS to operate.

With the geotargeting (a very simplified example) someone searching for Chicago widgets within your geotargeted area will see the regional campaign ads. Someone in Florida for instance, searching for Chicago widgets would see the national ads triggered by the regional keyword combo.

You should be able to do some very detailed performance analysis with the results, although it will be a bit complex.

Freq---

netmeg

WebmasterWorld Senior Member netmeg us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 3:13 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Actually, I just tried this for the first time for one of my accounts about two weeks ago. They have a service that is national, but with some particular hooks for various regions of the country, so we wanted to advertise those hooks where they were applicable. We started off with higher CPCs, but within a week, we were seeing much LOWER CPCs, and much HIGHER conversion rates than our national campaigns. So we're sold, and will continue and expand the regionals.

bbcarter

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 6:06 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

Awesome idea guys- will run with that!

eWhisper

WebmasterWorld Administrator ewhisper us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 7:52 pm on Nov 8, 2005 (gmt 0)

With the geotargeting (a very simplified example) someone searching for Chicago widgets within your geotargeted area will see the regional campaign ads. Someone in Florida for instance, searching for Chicago widgets would see the national ads triggered by the regional keyword combo.

Just an FYI (the above suggestion is great).

In the above example, if the keyword 'widget' is geotargeted to Chicago, and someone from Florida searches for 'Chicago Widget' then it is possible the geotargeted ad is triggered.

One of the real advantages of this type of targeting is to use geospecific keywords in an ad for a nongeographic specific search. Someone in Chicago searching for 'widgets' and seeing an ad title of 'Chicago Widgets' is much more likely to click on an ad than seeing the title 'Discount Widgets for Sale' because of the relevancy factor.

Obviously, there are some industries where geoqualified words don't make a difference, however, in those where it does - they can make a huge difference.

Number22

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 9:02 am on Nov 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

awesome replies guys!

how about a couple of scenario's then -

with some assumtions:-

- client has set up regional targeting
- regional campaings are backed up by a national campaign
- the campaign structures and keywords are almost identical (with ad-copy differences and some slight differences in keyword sets based on what services each region can provide)

1) A consumer in a targeted region searches on a generic keyword - eg "Widgets" - however, that keyword is in both the national campaign (with a lower CPC) and in the regional campaign (with a slightly higher CPC)

What ad would be served? What cpc (national or regional) would they be expected to pay?

2) A consumer in a non-targeted region searches on a keyword "widgets" - however, this keyword is only in the targeted campaigns and NOT in the national campaign.

Would they get served an ad at all? If so, what would they see?

3) A consumer in a targeted region searches on a keyword that is not in the targeted campaign BUT IS in the national campaign.

What ad would they see?

Thanks!

-22-

eWhisper

WebmasterWorld Administrator ewhisper us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 1:57 pm on Nov 9, 2005 (gmt 0)

1) A consumer in a targeted region searches on a generic keyword - eg "Widgets" - however, that keyword is in both the national campaign (with a lower CPC) and in the regional campaign (with a slightly higher CPC)

It's not always CPC, the ad rank formula [adwords.google.com] determines which ad is shown.

Since in a regional campaign you know 2 factors about your visitors (keyword and region) you should be able to make a high quality score ad which outperforms your national ad. However, it is always possible for your national ad to outperform your regional.

A hierarchy score of if regional, show regional, if national, show national type of control has been on my wish list since October 03 when the program launched [webmasterworld.com].

2) A consumer in a non-targeted region searches on a keyword "widgets" - however, this keyword is only in the targeted campaigns and NOT in the national campaign.

2. In this case, no ad should be displayed to that consumer.

3) A consumer in a targeted region searches on a keyword that is not in the targeted campaign BUT IS in the national campaign.

Assuming the expanded broad match feature does not match a keyword in the regional campaign - then they should see a national ad like anyone else.

Number22

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 6824 posted 9:13 am on Nov 10, 2005 (gmt 0)

thanks for the replies guys, they were really informative and useful!

we'll be rolling this out shortly in the UK and another EU market so have my fingers crossed!

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Google / Google AdWords
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved