homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.147.196.159
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Pubcon Platinum Sponsor 2014
Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / The Macintosh Webmaster
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: travelin cat

The Macintosh Webmaster Forum

    
Should I Buy a Powerbook?
Just because it is cool?
br33526

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 1:48 am on Mar 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

I have a slight dilemma. I'm in the market for a new notebook. Our whole office and both my computers at home are Windows XP.

I've heard good things about the Powerbook 15.2. I have never owned a MAC before.

If I use my business logic, I should buy a XP notebook, because that's what I use at home and the office. No compatability issues. AND it is cheaper.

But the coolness factor of the powerbook draws me to it like "my precious" to Frodo.

If I bought a Powerbook, would the honeymoon period quickly end and would I have difficulty with all the files and programs that I work with? Would networking also be an issue?

 

br33526

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 1:49 am on Mar 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

For all you Mac Fanatics, please try to provide unbiased feedback. Thanks!

your_store

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 2:51 am on Mar 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

would I have difficulty with all the files and programs that I work with?

Really depends on what programs you use. If you're talking about Office files, then you won't have a problem.

Would networking also be an issue?

Definitely not. Panther makes working w/ PC's even easier.

jamesa

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 4:02 am on Mar 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

>> If I bought a Powerbook, would the honeymoon period quickly end and would I have difficulty with all the files and programs that I work with? Would networking also be an issue? <<

Most likely you'll be just fine. The only thing to beware of is if you are relying on any Windows-only software. With mainstream software, though, there is usually a Mac version, and if not you'll likely find other software that does the same thing. For example, I can think of two programs not available for the Mac: MS Access and Visio. Access is easily replaced with Filemaker, AppleWorks or any of the opensource one's like MySQL. Omni web makes a great app like Visio (but I'm not sure about file compatibility on that one). So the thing to do is inventory all the software you rely on and make sure that there are Mac equivalents. I'll bet you dollars to donuts everything you need will be covered. All the mainstream stuff (internet, offices apps, graphics, music/movies, web development apps, etc) is plentiful on the Mac.

>> But the coolness factor of the powerbook draws me to it like "my precious" to Frodo. <<

Sounds like a great reason to me. Assuming what I mentioned above checks out okay, then what's wrong with owning a computer that you'll love? ;)

sonjay

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 6:00 pm on Mar 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

Not to mention, a little variety is a good thing..... Do you ever receive Mac files from Mac-using friends (or business assciates) that the PCs have trouble opening? Ever receive Mac-formatted disks that the PCs don't recognize? With your PB, you'll be able to open those files and access those disks. Ever have your whole network brought down by a virus? With your PB, you'll be unaffected and be able to continue working (or playing). I have a Mac and a PC on my desk, and I *frequently* run into situations where one machine has a problem with something, but the other machine handles it flawlessly. Add a Mac to your network, and you add options.

Boltzmann

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 11:30 am on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm using a 12in power book for web design and research work. The only problem I've had so far is transfering Word documents created on the Mac to PC, if I import Excel graphs directly into my Word and PowerPoint files then they show up as a large red X on the PC. But I still use the Mac version of Word just because I like it and can do things faster than on the PC version. The coolness factor had a hand in making me pick up a Powerbook as well. It's just so cool and compact and thin, none of the PC notebooks really compare.

258cib

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 2:17 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I would advise against the Mac Powerbook if your office is on Windows and you run on a secure network. The workarounds can be done, but you'll be hassling the tech staff.

The Powerbook is wonderful, however.

microcars

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 3:37 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I would advise against the Mac Powerbook if your office is on Windows and you run on a secure network. The workarounds can be done, but you'll be hassling the tech staff.

and of course, I would advise the opposite ;-)

you will need less tech support overall and the tech staff is supposed to serve YOU, not the other way around.

my wife uses her iBook in an all Windows world and manages to do OK. without tech support too. this is an office where people don't even know how to cut and paste.

there are other Mac users in the office, but they were told they could ONLY use Windows, so they went out and bought big clunky Dell laptops and when they saw that my wife's 2 year old iBook worked fine, several of them were very pissed off that they had been duped into buying a new laptop.

note that this is a Reator office with a wireless network and mostly all they do is access their mail, and use a variety of browsers to access the Multiple Listing Services.

jusdrum

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 4:12 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I use a 12" iBook G4 and I love it.

The thing that I notice most for PC users when they hop on a Mac, is they get confused by the little differences. Such as right-clicking. Macs don't have right clicks, although they do have a control-click which is similar and can be programmed on virtually all multi-button mice. File management is different too. Especially compared to XP. Macs tend to let you put stuff wherever you want it, whereas Windows tends to define where things go for you.

I think the biggest place where Mac compatibility becomes a problem is in the web arena. For example, the Google toolbar is not available for a Mac! That's huge.

I am an avid Mac user. I should be on Apple's payroll for how often I recommend their products. However, I still own Windows boxes because there are certain functions that I need from them. In fact, I have a Windows box at my office that I use Microsoft's remote desktop client to access. So I get around most of my Windows issues because I can temporarily turn my iBook into a Windows machine by opening the remote desktop client (I've never had good luck with emulators so I prefer an actual windows box that I can access remotely)/

psychobilly

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 4:41 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I just purchased the 15" PowerBook (1.5GHz, 1GB RAM), and it is great. The backlit keyboard is a nice feature, along with built in Bluetooth, SuperDrive and AirPort Extreme. My only complaint is the AirPort signal is weak. I have an AirPort Extreme base station which allows a fairly decent range. My old 667 TiBook always had full signal strength, hopefully it's just a software issue. I give it a 9 of 10...

djembes11

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 4:59 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

the mac is fine but look at it this way can you do something on a mac that you could not on a pc and if the pc is cheaper maybe you can get the super mac daddy pc for the same price for the coolness factor of having a mac that will be gone at the first problem you have with it but i think the real cool factor is having the fastest biggest and badest notebook that can be built make sure you can up grade and have a way to expand your possiblitys for making your work faster better and more yourself more effeciant
good luck

microcars

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 6:40 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

the mac is fine but look at it this way can you do something on a mac that you could not on a pc

yeah, surf the web and check email without having to constantly be patching the OS and running AntiVirus programs (extra $$$) and constantly running AdAware or Pest Patrol.

that's just one thing thats nice

...and if the pc is cheaper maybe you can get the super mac daddy pc for the same price

? what is the "super mac daddy pc"? does it run OS X?

if you want to play games on your laptop, get a fast Windows machine.

...having the fastest biggest and badest notebook that can be built make sure you can up grade and have a way to expand your possiblitys for making your work faster better and more yourself more effeciant

sound like you are describing a Powerbook. ;-)

258cib

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 7:18 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

I've changed my mind: Get the Mac, let the tech guys work around you. You can tell I have that old "IT-is it" attitude.

jamesa

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 5:06 pm on Apr 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

>> Macs don't have right clicks

Yes they do. No drivers to install. Just plug in a any two-button mouse and you're set. Same goes for the scroll wheel. (With one-button mice you can Control-click to get the contextual menus, for those of you not familiar with Macs).

mivox

WebmasterWorld Senior Member mivox us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 438 posted 6:53 pm on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

Should I Buy a Powerbook?
Just because it is cool?

Yes.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / The Macintosh Webmaster
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved