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Can Mac write a PC formatted CD?
minnapple




msg:975566
 2:18 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

I have a client that needs to send be some jpg files. He has a Mac I have a PC. Can he write to a formatted CD that a PC can read?
If so what does he select in writing mode?

Thanks
Minnapple

 

bird




msg:975567
 2:25 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

No problem at all (it's only the PC writer programs that are so horribly inflexible... ;))

Have him write a Joliet file system on the CD. It can be a Joliet/HFS hybrid, which would allow him to read the same CD as well, but for you only the Joliet part matters. Any decent writer software on the Mac should be able to create either.

Macguru




msg:975568
 3:07 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

It is important to note that not all Mac CD recording software is able to write in the ISO 9660 format. For instance, Toast comes with popular CD writers but one need to purchase the "pro" version to be able to do so.

Most CD writers sold a couple of years ago came with Toast.

lawman




msg:975569
 3:08 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)


How about the other way around?

Lawman

txbakers




msg:975570
 4:44 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

PC's generally cannot read MAC disks at all. There was one program called TRANSMAC (see Tucows) which worked well for me, but since the MAC doesn't use file extensions (like .txt or .jpg) it's not always foolproof.

OS X starts to use file extensions for MAC files.

bird




msg:975571
 4:57 am on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

not all Mac CD recording software is able to write in the ISO 9660 format.

Sure you're not confusing something here?

There is no data CD-ROM without the ISO 9660 format. All other "formats" (RockRidge for unix, HFS for Mac, Joliet for Windows) are just directory extensions on top of the real thing. This is also the reason why you can put all three of those together on the same disk, accessing the same ISO 9660 format data through different path name translations.

Some software may not be able to write only ISO 9660, basically forcing you to also write the directory extension, but this doesn't mean the underlying standard format data isn't there.

How about the other way around?

You mean Windows software that can write anything other than Joliet or plain ISO 9600? Never seen such a beast. Which doesn't mean it can't exist, of course... ;)

Macguru




msg:975572
 12:52 pm on Jan 12, 2002 (gmt 0)

>>Sure you're not confusing something here?

May be. From a Mac user point of view, the Sierra ISO 9660 standard is an extension to the system. It all in the point of view... ;) I agree with bird that the ISO 9660 is the underlying format on wich you can write different file formats extension.

Nevertheless, if some Mac user burns his CDs with Toast lite (and most do) PC users will not be able to open them if filenemes (like URLs) contain special caracters like slashe ans backslashes. More details can be obtained here [macdisk.com] on the third paragraph.

jimbo_mac




msg:975573
 1:15 pm on Jan 13, 2002 (gmt 0)

have you tried Discribe ???
[charismac.com ]
might be what you are after.

mivox




msg:975574
 10:44 pm on Jan 13, 2002 (gmt 0)

I use Discribe regularly. Corny user interface, but it can write PC or Mac or hybrid CDs.

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