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New Site, Just a Few Questions
meta tags, changing page names and site design
AmyNY




msg:962061
 9:01 pm on Dec 31, 2002 (gmt 0)

I am working on a site which is a large catalog of products.
I submitted the url to some search engines and since changed the name
of some of the pages. I noticed google has the names of the
old pages but luckily does direct the user to the new page.
When will google get rid of the old, non-existant pages?

Regarding meta tags - I put the entire list (it's a long one)
of meta tags on every page in the site. If I have a page
selling widgets and another selling nuts and another selling
bolts do I put widgets, nuts, bolts as meta tags for each
page or just widgets on the widget page, nuts on the nut
page, etc.?

I plan to do another revamp of the site to make it look more
professional (and if the site generates business revamp
again when I change hosts and add more advanced and expensive
stuff - ie: credit card online, cgi script support).
I have 100s of items with photos and descriptions
to still add (months of work). Also, want to optimize to
get more hits with what is already online so we can make
some sales. Any advice on what to focus on?

Thanks for your help.

Amy

 

pendanticist




msg:962062
 9:31 pm on Dec 31, 2002 (gmt 0)

Regarding meta tags - I put the entire list (it's a long one) of meta tags on every page in the site. If I have a page selling widgets and another selling nuts and another selling bolts do I put widgets, nuts, bolts as meta tags for each page or just widgets on the widget page, nuts on the nut page, etc.?

Were it me, I'd compartmentalize them to the extent that they are seperated. Distinctive things stand out, muddled ones do not.

To elaborate: Suppose one plugged 'nuts' into their favorite engine and all they got were 'bolts' with a sprinkling of 'nuts' that they were forced to wade through. Catch my drift?

Pendanticist.

AmyNY




msg:962063
 2:28 am on Jan 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

Thank you for your help.

pendanticist




msg:962064
 4:07 am on Jan 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

You are most Welcome :) Amy.

Since that word now seems to flooow so smoothly off my fingertips, let me apologize for not welcoming you to WebmasterWorld earlier.
:(

This is a great place to learn.

Oh, hey.

I am working on a site which is a large catalog of products. I submitted the url to some search engines and since changed the name of some of the pages. I noticed google has the names of the old pages but luckily does direct the user to the new page. When will google get rid of the old, non-existant pages?

I'm working on something similar in this thread (entitled "Redirect permanent"): [webmasterworld.com...] in an effort to trim down my .htaccess files.

Maybe there is something in there for you.

Pendanticist.

jdMorgan




msg:962065
 6:45 am on Jan 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

Special_Edition,

Welcome to WebmasterWorld [webmasterworld.com]!

The last two sites I built, I submitted to the Open Diretory Project only. Two months later, these sites were listed well by every major search engine in the US. Submit - as we used to know it five years ago - is pretty much dead. The new model is that search engine spiders find your site by finding links to it from other sites and from major directories like ODP.

If I felt a need to kick-start a new site, I'd submit the home page only, and I'd submit it only once. After the site is listed, re-submitting is a waste of time, IMO. Repeated submissions, or submitting more than just a few pages might even irritate them - the Web has probably grown too large for them to handle even one submission per day per webmaster! Something like 7 million new pages per day...

Note that Google is reputed to drop sites that it can't find any links to, even if the site is submitted to them. Incoming links with on-topic link text from relevant, authoritative, high-PR sites is the way to go.

If it isn't obvious from the above, those "We'll submit your site to 25,000 search engines, and re-submit once a month" offers are not worth very much these days...

Jim

AmyNY




msg:962066
 7:59 pm on Jan 2, 2003 (gmt 0)

So much info my head is spinning.

Pendanticist - I read your link and some of the stuff is way over my head. Don't know what back links are and I don't have logs from my site. I'm paying $5 a month for hidden version of extreme tracking. Don't know when the SE looks at my site. Think google missed me in Dec. The new pages I added in early Dec do not seem to be listed.

jdMorgan - I did not know about the open directory and will submit there immediately. Now I know what dmoz means. I've read here about links and I don't know how to get good links to my site. We advertise in Thomas Register and they are now giving us one free year link. After that they want $1400 (ugh). I added a link to my angelfire website I did 3 yrs ago, haven't updated, gets one hit a day and it's about my favorite, unrelated hobby. We can't get links from competitors, don't believe manufacturers will link either (some have given us permission to use their pictures and product descriptions). Hope google doesn't drop us. My angelfire site gets hits from google still and it only has one link from a friends website.

jdMorgan




msg:962067
 1:34 am on Jan 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

AmyNY,

I had posted that in reply to someone else's post which has now disappeared...?

Well, glad it helped you a little, too... :)

One link is all you need. More is better. How about:

  • Suppliers (both goods and services)
  • Customers
  • Trade associations
  • Local Chamber of Commerce
  • Special-interest groups (users of your products or services)

    Getting links can be easy or hard. Be resourceful! The best links are "reasonable" - they come from sites which have a reason to link to you. The relationship can be business-driven, or it can be resource-driven. Thus, all the discussion around here about creating useful content for Web sites. With a collection of good tutorials/editorials/application notes/stuff_like_that, people will send you e-mails asking if they can link to you!

    Good content is what DMOZ/ODP and other directories look for, too. Check out the Directories [webmasterworld.com] forum, too.

    Of course, all of the above depends on what your site is for, some of it may not apply at all...

    HTH,
    Jim

  • Robert Charlton




    msg:962068
     2:33 am on Jan 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

    >>Regarding meta tags - I put the entire list (it's a long one)
    of meta tags on every page in the site.
    <<

    Amy - Welcome to WebmasterWorld. The above sounds like you're talking about the meta keywords tag. It's pretty unlikely that the meta keywords tag is going to help you rank on any search engine these days... and even when it did help, the longer it was, the less likely it was to help.

    Here are a couple of threads about meta tags...

    This one discusses the length of the keywords tag:
    [webmasterworld.com...]

    This one discusses the intelligent use of meta tags, and as you can see as you read all of it (and I recommend that you do), the original post was perpetuating some misunderstandings about how useful the tags were...
    [webmasterworld.com...]

    And here's [searchenginewatch.com] by Danny Sullivan about the "Death of a Meta Tag," which talks about the history of the meta keywords tag... and about why it's now ancient history.

    The title tag is technically not a meta tag, though it's sometimes grouped with them... and that tag is very important to search. There are a lot of reasons why what you can effectively target on one page is limited. The length of the title tag is among them. Try to keep this tag under 60 or 70 characters... less for competitive phrases.

    Large catalogue sites are particularly hard to optimize. Page focus is extremely important. So, to get back to your original question, whether you use meta keywords or not... you want to think of each page as being optimized for a few phrases, at most, made up of not very many words. Hope this helps.

    AmyNY




    msg:962069
     3:37 am on Jan 3, 2003 (gmt 0)

    Thanks again everyone for the good advice.

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