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Usability 101
JamesR




msg:965633
 5:44 pm on Jul 11, 2002 (gmt 0)

Over the last year, much of the focus of my study has been on website usability. I never realized how important a factor it was until the principles were put in my face and I realized that usability issues directly affect what websites I use and what I don't use.

So, a few tips for beginners in this thread. How do I make my site usable, one that people will return to again and again?

1) Logical site structurce - this is the philosophy behind the now famous theme pyramid [webmasterworld.com]. It is so much easier to access information with the most important general information topics linked from the home page and more specific information linked from those topic pages. See above thread for Brett's graphical representation.

2) Clear and consistent navigation - This flows out of your site structure. What good is content if your visitors can't find it?

3) Familiar labels - use keywords in your navigation and site structure that people are searching on! Not only is this good SEO, but your visitors will clearly recognize areas of your site they want to access once they get to your site. Avoid corporate speak (unless the site is for a corporate audience), use the language of the searcher. Taylor everything to your audience.

4) Use conventions - Don't reinvent the wheel! (unless you are darn sure it is a superior wheel...). People have been trained to think a certain way on the web. We are used to shopping carts built certain ways, links acting in certain ways, and information put in certain places. If someone decides to build a site that upsets conventions (like removing all the underlines from text links) people will get frustrated with the site and move on.

5) Declare your purpose immediately - if someone comes to your site and can;t figure out what it does for them or how it solves their problem, they will probably not spend a lot of time figuring it out. There are a lot of other sites to try out besides yours and they are just a couple clicks away.

6) Stay focused - Avoid clutter. Sites that incorporate tons of affiliate banners, random topics, and poor use of "white space" confuse the visitor and may even give them a headache. Be sure they probably won't be a return visitor.

7) Fast loading pages - Nothing is more frustrating than having to wait for a page to load. The web has made us all impatient. Give it to em quick or they will go somewhere else.

8) Do unto others as you would have them do unto you - I find that I am one of my best test users. I analyze what I like and don't like about the websites I visit and avoid those problems in my sites. It would probably be useful, once you have your site up and running, to have different people try it out and give you honest feedback on how easy it was to use and find information.

If you want books on the topic I felt were extremely helpful, feel free to sticky mail me.

 

Hawkgirl




msg:965634
 3:45 am on Jul 13, 2002 (gmt 0)

How do you keep your eyes fresh? After working on usability for my site for 2 and a half years now, there are things I just don't see anymore.

Every time I test before a site release I miss little things because I've seen them so many times they just don't register anymore.

(I'm not quite "new to web development" but at the same time, you've outlined good points and I'm curious how to avoid this kind of burnout - especially since you consider yourself one of your own best test users!)

dcheney




msg:965635
 3:52 am on Jul 13, 2002 (gmt 0)

One of the things that has most effected design changes over the years on my own site is my own use of the site. I've got a local copy and typically use it to look up things a few times every day (in the course of other related research or whatever). It amazing how many small adjustments made the site much easier/faster to use.

keyplyr




msg:965636
 6:39 am on Jul 13, 2002 (gmt 0)

Ooops :)

hayluke




msg:965637
 11:20 am on Jul 15, 2002 (gmt 0)

I'm in a good position as I was able to set up a focus group of users simular to those who would be using the site and get their thoughts. The results were very interesting and quite different to what we expected.

I think if you can possibly do this for your site then it is the best kind of usability testing as to an extent different people will use sites in different ways..

rewboss




msg:965638
 9:51 pm on Jul 15, 2002 (gmt 0)

Always have some friends who a) aren't afraid to criticize you, and b) surf the net regularly, but still can't tell you what their screen resolution is set to, or what a file extension is.

Your techie friends will probably give you lots of useful advice like, "such-and-such an image has JPEG artifacts" and "you've mistyped that tag". But they're not too hot on things like, "I got to the Sales page, but I couldn't figure out how I'm supposed to place an order..."

meannate




msg:965639
 12:19 am on Jul 16, 2002 (gmt 0)

Asking mom to surf the site will often render the more subtle details you may have overlooked... Who better than the woman that taught you that the LEFT shoe goes on the LEFT foot? hahah

rjohara




msg:965640
 2:03 am on Jul 18, 2002 (gmt 0)

A site that is really quite good for beginners and experts alike is the usability site begun by the National Cancer Institute. I see that it now has the simple high-level name [usability.gov...]

JamesR




msg:965641
 6:11 pm on Jul 18, 2002 (gmt 0)

Lots of usability and site idea tips in these threads:

What do you love about the web? [webmasterworld.com]

What do you hate about the web? [webmasterworld.com]

Usability involves the ability to get people to the information they are looking for quickly and easily without annoying them with the things they hate :) (revised definition of the term)

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