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making a website
New to this
Sue_Smith




msg:960958
 7:11 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Want to make a site on our band..Not a clue. Do I have to buy something on a disc. or is it all in my iMac?

 

Symbios




msg:960959
 7:15 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Sue,

Welcome to webmasterworld, probably the best way is to do a search on Google for 'making a website' there's some excellent sites out there.

Then come back to fine tune your site and get help as you go along.

benihana




msg:960960
 7:18 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

just to reinforce what symbios said, when you get stuck this is THE place to ask questions. welcome.

Sue_Smith




msg:960961
 7:19 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Thanks Symbios - will do that. Sue

jatar_k




msg:960962
 7:25 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Welcome to WebmasterWorld Sue_Smith,

To start you will need to learn some html and get something you can edit/create it with.

This can be done in any text editor or for those who like a drag and drop graphical interface there are also a ton of those programs around.

When you are searching you can look for things like "html editor". A very popular one is Dreamweaver but it has a nice little price tag on it. You could get a trial version to see if you like it though.

mack




msg:960963
 3:19 am on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hey sue, welcome to webmasterworld,

I think we need to be more helpfull here guys ;-) after all this is the "new to web development" forum.

As Jatar_k mentioned "To start you will need to learn some html" very true. HTMl is the building block of the internet. HTML code is what your browser reads to display a web page.

To be nonest I am not sure anout Imac's I have never used an Apple computer, I am strictly a windows/linux guy. Having said that if you have a text editor you can build pages!

On Windows machines users are almost spoiled for choice when it comes to this sort of thing, you can simply visit a software store and buy a package taylored to the job. With your current system it isn't quite that simple. Many windows programs use what is knows as wysiwyg (what you see is what you get) generaly this means you build your pages without having to write any of the code. This all sounds very good, but also has many pit-falls. this type of software tends to write poor quality code and can cause your site not to work as intended within different web browsers.

This may well end up working to your advantage. Because you will be writting the code, you will be able to learn as you go along.

When I started learning HTML I went out and bought a book. Most have examples etc, and the book starts at the basics and works it's way through to more complexed ideas and concepts.

At this stage it all sounds very complicated, but we have all been there, be sure to drop back if you have any more questions.

Mack.

jamesa




msg:960964
 10:26 am on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

Sue_Smith, my first website was for a band :). My advice is to find a good HTML tutorial and give yourself a few days with it. There are so many out there (a search for HTML tutorial will give you tons of results), just find one that reads well for you.

On the iMac, if you're running OS X use TextEdit but be sure to select "Make Plain Text" in the Format menu first. On OS 9 use SimpleText. Any web browser will do.

If you want a visual environment (known as WYSIWYG for "What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get") there's tons of software out there - Dreamweaver, GoLive, etc. Or download Netscape 7 and use Composer which is free. But start with the HTML tutorials before getting any WYSIWYG software because a basic understanding of HTML will make your life much, much easier.

Hope this helps.

The_Rookie




msg:960965
 7:33 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm still very new to this whole process as well.

My input...being a visual learner (or one who likes to pound my head against a brick wall before asking for help...), Dreamweaver has been a great help. There's a split-screen option, where you can work both in the code and in the WYSIWYG versions at the same time. You can do the MS Word "insert table" types of functions using WYSIWYG, and can watch how Dreamweaver writes the code. A little playing around, and you'll be an old pro (take that for what it's worth coming from a rookie).

Scottish chickadee




msg:960966
 11:20 am on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

hi sure,

first off...i am almost a newbie too..but wanted to let you know what i had learned.

one of the most inmportant things seems to be to know some html. Even if you buy a package that can do everything you need and more, html knowledge is still a very valuable asset to have.

Being a newbie, some of the packages can look very scarey indeed. At first you wont even understand what some of the functions mean, let alone what they do.

front page, dreamweaver..both good, but one of the simplist i have found is Serif. Simple drag and drop and seems to be a pretty good wysiwyg.

This forum is also invaluable. What the guys on here dont know is not worth knowing lol
lou
xx

sniffer




msg:960967
 11:53 am on May 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

htmlgoodies.com is thorough and fairly easy to follow, helped me with html and some other stuff

freedomwatchdog




msg:960968
 2:44 pm on May 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

Greetings;

Found this post and it hit a nerve with me too! I am not new to the web, in fact, I've been around a couple of years. However, creating a website, the right way, is like the first time I went to my Algebra - 101 class... I had no idea of the concept because it didn't click... Then after months it became clear and I understood. I've learned that website design is not just basic HTML knowledge but much more! It looks like those formulas on my my first day in Algebra... I can't quite "see" it yet. I know some HTML but that, and $1.00, will get me a cup of coffee :-)

If anyone has any suggestions at all on the a place to go, or the best way to understand the basics, (rather than buying a pre-made site), please let me know... I need about five good sites ASAP!

Noe that I'm here, I can possibly also offer some help in many basic areas if anybody needs some really basic help. I'm familiar with some software products but not much more yet... I'm like a sponge... I'm going to absorb what I can and maybe get squeezed for some simple help from time-to-time too!

I'm glad I found this Forum. My thanks to each and every one and I wish all the very best to all of you!

George J Malvar

[edited by: DaveAtIFG at 2:56 pm (utc) on May 3, 2004]
[edit reason] Abbreviated sig [/edit]

photon




msg:960969
 3:26 pm on May 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

Welcome to WebmasterWorld, Sue_Smith, The_Rookie and freedomwatchdog!

Just keep reading the forums here and you'll learn enough to qualify for a graduate degree in all things webmaster-related.

hannamyluv




msg:960970
 6:21 pm on May 3, 2004 (gmt 0)

htmlgoodies.com is thorough and fairly easy to follow, helped me with html and some other stuff

I learned basic HTML from there too, years ago. I recommend their primer to anyone I know that wants to learn really basic HTML but have no clue what HTML is. They make it easy to understand the concept.

frenzy77




msg:960971
 10:55 am on May 5, 2004 (gmt 0)
Hello Sue_Smith:^)

From: frenzy77

I read your post.
I am also new here.(joined may 3, 2004)
I'm kind of experienced with html and inlining CSS code. I'm building a site as we speak and also have had some questions regarding coding(CSS).
Once you build your site your gonna have to promote it, find a host (someone who will place it on the internet for you) or find a place that will allow you to do it for free.(host it)
Your gonna have to do alot of reading to promote your site and all that other extra stuff. But don't worry it's not dificult just a pain.

As far as learning to design a website, go to

*******

(when typing it in make sure to include
the www part or else it will display error.
That's what it did to me anyway when I
looked it up for you.)

This site is Free! And has step by step instructions.
**Once there click on the "Learn HTML" link at the left of the screen. Then click on the "start learning html" link in the middle of the page.
**Next start reading scrolling downwardly until you get to the part that say's "next" and click on this link. Keep doing this thoughout the pages.

**I tell you this because when I first started at this site I kind of got confused as to where I was on the site and missed information because I skipped it by mistake by clicking on the "next" on the top of the page.(don't click on this one!) (This site
site looks a little cluttered with all the information everywhere.)

This is where I taught myself html code(designing a website with this code. Don't worrry about learning it, it's really easy.)

As far as how to start to code it, look for an html editor(such as notepad) on your computer. I don't know if you have notepad on your computer, it's kind of old. But you should. If not look for something else that lets you write the code.(a different
editor)

*****I researched and found that if you have a mac,
you should look for "Simple Text"(editor) on your computer.

**This is for windows xp. I don't know how it is on other platforms.
**But I would look for "notepad" first, as it is easy to use.
**To find these on your computer go to your "all programs" area and look under "Accessories" and scroll around until you find "notepad" or "Simple Text" and click on it. It will open up a window and you can type in the code.(notepad editor) I don't know about simple text editor.) When you finish coding it all in, click on file at the top and save it with "save as" and then name it whatever you
want and place a ".html"(no quotes) at the end of it. Next click on save and your done! To view it, double click on it(the file) and it will display it. If you need to know how to view the source code so you can continue to change the page whenever you
want to, first display your page, then go to the top of your screen and click on "view" and scroll down to "source". This will bring up your file with the source code in it. Then make the changes and
save it as I stated before.

***Save it like this:

Example:

mypage.html

I hope this helps:)
****If you need some more help sticky mail me.******

ps. Good luck with your band. :^)
Let me know how it's doing.
And if it takes off let me know!
+++++++++
frenzy77
+++++++++

stef25




msg:960972
 1:09 pm on May 5, 2004 (gmt 0)

i am doing work for free at the moment to build up a portofolio, so i could help you out. even teach you some along the way

just post a reply here if intrested!

kind regards
stefan

Goober




msg:960973
 11:23 pm on May 5, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hi Sue_Smith and everyone else who is new.

This is a GREAT place to learn. I'm sure you can find all the answers you need. Also, it wouldn't hurt to find someone who likes your band who also is web literate. Next time you play, just ask.

Goober

ktwilight




msg:960974
 11:11 pm on May 6, 2004 (gmt 0)

i hardly recommend w3schools.com to start off with, besides this place... ^^;;

Eric_Jarvis




msg:960975
 11:35 am on May 7, 2004 (gmt 0)

one thing most tutorials are extremely weak on is the first stage of the process

BEFORE you start actually making a site you need to establish precisely what you want it to do, and how you expect it to do it...so before you learn html you need to do some thinking about basic marketing and site architecture...what information will you actually need, how can you structure that in terms of "narratives" that the visitor can follow easily, which bits of information will need to connect to each other, and how will you organise them?

it's all stuff that is far easier to do before you start on site design...afterwards you'll only end up having to rip up the design or settle for second best when it comes to something really important

I don't think it's possible to over stress the imposrtance of this stage of the process...it's also where the vast majority of web sites fail

a useful technique is to find a large space and use post it notes to represent bits of information...then move them around and see what patterns easily take you from arriving at the site to a "point of sale"

when creating a site from scratch I generally spend around ha;f to three quarters of the total time on this stage of the process...partly because it's so important, but also because the longer I spend planning the easier it is to do the actual site building

crashomon




msg:960976
 4:50 pm on May 7, 2004 (gmt 0)

ktwilight is right, w3schools is an excellent way to learn.

Learning HTML is a lot like driving a car, except when you mess up, you don't kill anyone! :-)

I'm self-taught like a lot of others, and I rely on Amazon's reviews to help me determine which books to help me get where I need to go.

Good luck!

Patrick Elward

wavebird23




msg:960977
 1:30 am on May 14, 2004 (gmt 0)

Go to <Snipped> I have been using <Snipped> for 3 years, and they are absouloutely the best, in my opinion. They have plans from free on up. Good luck with your band website!

[edited by: mack at 4:25 am (utc) on May 14, 2004]

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