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How much is your website worth
Website value
forex




msg:778793
 1:38 pm on Mar 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

Many websites are for sale. How is the website value/sale price determined

 

percentages




msg:778794
 5:49 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are numerous ways to determine value of any asset, such as a business (including a website).

There are many posts on this board covering this subject.

The old school says 10 times net annual profit plus the cost of real assets. I still like this approach.

We can all claim our sites will be "hot" in five years time so that a buyer should pay 100 times current profit or projected profit.

Personally I would never pay more than 10 times current net profit, plus liquid assets. That is a conservative approach...but, a wise one IMHO :)

Any buyer who pays more is taking a large risk, not a percentage play!

forex




msg:778795
 5:55 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

The old school says 10 times net annual profit plus the cost of real assets. I still like this approach.

Does the same applies to buying companies. I always thought how is the sale price for a company determined. A website is like a company

percentages




msg:778796
 6:22 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>Does the same applies to buying companies.

Traditionally, (prior to the late 90's), yes!

The theory is simple, making 10% on your money per year is a hard thing to consistently achieve via any traditional method over the long-term. So therefore buying a company or website that gives a 10% PA return is a reasonable purchase (via growth or returns).

However, in recent years "irrational exuberance" has ruled the economy, less today than 6 years ago, but, it still exists.

e.g. Google has run been between $174 & $475 a share in the last 12 months. From that alone we have to conclude that basic rules are now out of the window. Investors are no longer Investors, they are gamblers IMHO!

Google's current PE is 67, its 2006 forward estimate is 8.74, I'll buy into a lot of growth companies with a current PE under 10, but, not one that has to achieve 8 times PA growth to achieve it......but, I'm a conservative!

forex




msg:778797
 6:41 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

Exorbitant share prices are created by high level stock brokers(big players). Real share prices given by companies is something different. General public never know what's going-on in the stock market.
For example. If there is a threat of hurricane in USA the price of crude oil increases.
If I'm correct "Bill Gates" lost $18 Billion in one single day's trading at stock market in 1986

forex




msg:778798
 7:45 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

percentages, if you want a quote for your postings, click on "Style Codes" when writing the message & select [quote]icq number[/quote
Delete "icq number" & write the message you want to quote

[edited by: stuntdubl at 8:21 pm (utc) on April 13, 2006]

percentages




msg:778799
 8:04 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>percentages, if you want a quote for your postings, click on "Style Codes" when writing the message & select [quote]icq number[/quote
Delete "icq number" & write the message you want to quote

Thanks......but, done it the way I do it for 15+ years, and I'm not about to change now!

You see some of us just don't change. We value companies in the exact same way as they were valued 20 or 100 years ago. We write using the same methods of communication that were used 20+ years ago.

We adapt to technology, but, we don't necessarily see it as a good thing for society!

I'm of the older generation.....I think the younger generation has gone mad! Your parents will tell you the same. It might be that we are slow to change, or it might be that the younger generation has literally lost it's way?

To be on topic.....the "older" generation definitely values companies, assets, & web sites differently. Who is right or wrong, well, time will prove the answer ;)

forex




msg:778800
 9:32 am on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

percentages, Older generation has given the younger generation a world of comfort. Older generation worked hard, tried & tested & developed technology that's the reason younger generation is technologically advanced. Older generation are the pioneers of modern technology. Their sacrifice is highly honoured.
But if there is something new & beneficial it should be accepted by all. Try "quote" function.

offsky




msg:778801
 4:57 pm on Apr 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

To get back to the original question, the 10x rule is pretty good. Sometimes a cost/user valuation is used. So you can take your yearly unique visitors and multiply it by whatever you think 1 person is worth to your site (a few cents probably).

These dont account for some things such as future potential, competition, uniqueness, etc. There are many domain appraisal companies out there that may or may not be able to give a good estimate. <snip>

The real price is whatever the buyer is willing to pay :)

[edited by: stuntdubl at 8:22 pm (utc) on April 13, 2006]
[edit reason] no urls please per TOS [webmasterworld.com] [/edit]

andye




msg:778802
 10:10 am on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

You could also talk to a couple of business brokers and see what their valuation is.

hth, a.

klick2kall




msg:778803
 1:06 pm on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's pretty situational. Not really a single equation type of transaction.

The amount you pay or receive for a business should always be a much larger and more complicated calculation than factoring the net by any multiple.

You have to know the industry market share, the potential growth of that market, the companies ability to withstand change in that sector and adapt to it to continue to reap in the profits it is currently seeing or will see, it also depends on the individuals investing style to an extent as well.

If your company has 80% market share in it's current market that MAY seem like a good thing...but it's not if you are peaked out and the market isn't showing further growth itself. You may be tapped and the company will only continue it's per annum growth numbers for maybe 3-5 more years...so the sale price would so reflect.

It also depends on your current staff, current financials, benefits, liquid assets etc...

But as has been said it can be a VERY rough estimate to say between 5-10 years of net prof. And 10 years would be VERY VERY best case scenario. I'd say it would mean that you are number 2 or 3 in your industry...the customer base would be almost outgrowing the companies that serve it and you had just launched a new product that was being very very well recepted in that last year.

PLUS, another thing sometimes that gets over looked. You absolutely have to contiuosly and religously save within your company. Take out only what you need to live and then leave the rest in their proper places. A company just wont sell period if it's piggy bank has been deflated prior to sale. Sure the company is making XXX dollars per year, but during a new takeover there's bound to be a grace period where they may want to dip into the company piggy to bring themselves back to working order.

andye




msg:778804
 2:06 pm on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

company just wont sell period if it's piggy bank has been deflated prior to sale

I don't know... one piece of advice I've heard is that if a buyer is borrowing to buy the business then they'll want to buy as little cash as possible - because otherwise they'll be borrowing cash (and having to pay interest on it) to buy cash.

best, a.

Essex_boy




msg:778805
 8:17 pm on Apr 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

I look at a business say an info website like mine bringing in say 100 per month then I reckon a fair price would by 1200.

Leva




msg:778806
 3:15 pm on Apr 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have a one-word dot-org domain that I registered in the mid 90's. It's got tremendous PR and a fair amount of traffic. And the name is memorable.

I wouldn't sell it for less than a few million. It's NOT worth that much now but quite frankly, it's an investment. The internet isn't going to go away, they're not making new one-word domains, and it'll only appreciate in value over the years. Particularly if I keep adding content to it and treat it well so that it grows in rank and traffic.

Why sell something now that will be worth more later?

Leva

Moosetick




msg:778807
 3:24 pm on Apr 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

"Why sell something now that will be worth more later? "

As a general rule, everything will be worth more later. If you like to eat, you eventually have to sell things that may appreciate.

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