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This 43 message thread spans 2 pages: 43 ( [1] 2 > >     
Google buys Dodgeball
location-based (cell phones) social networking service
atadams




msg:765367
 1:43 am on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Q: Why did dodgeball sell to Google?

A: As a two-person team, Alex and I have taken dodgeball about a far as we can alone. Since we finished grad school, we've been trying to figure out how to grow dodgeball and make it a better service along the way. We talked to a lot of different angel investors and venture capitalists, but no one really "got" what we were doing - that is until we met Google.

The people at Google think like us. They looked at us in a "You're two guys doing some pretty cool stuff, why not let us help you out and let's see what you can do with it" type of way. We liked that. Plus, Alex and I are both Google superfans and the people we've met so far are smart, cool and excited about what they're working on.

[dodgeball.com...]

 

badtzmaru




msg:765368
 1:35 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

There's a fortune to be made in the handheld market and this gets google into your mobile phone. The potential for location based services is tremendous. If google knows where people are, then it can do crazy stuff like serving location-sensitive ads direct to the phone.

atadams




msg:765369
 1:44 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

If google knows where people are, then it can do crazy stuff like serving location-sensitive ads direct to the phone.

I think we have a winner.

rj87uk




msg:765370
 1:46 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Its always been headed this way, Internet, IM, mobiles, text, wireless laptops and such.

Just a matter of time before we see more of these type of things.

onlineshrine




msg:765371
 2:06 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Corporations tend to make larger goals for themselves then the obvious.

Microsoft doesn't want to just want to build Web browsers, Word processors, operating systems, etc. It wants to create the software that enables you to realize your full potential, or so the company line goes.

Similarly, Google wants to enable they way you get information. This extends beyond simply when you are sitting at the computer surfing the Web.

Since these two areas overlap, we have the struggle for supremecy between Microsoft and Google [fortune.com] that is only really getting started but will be fascinating to watch.

oddsod




msg:765372
 2:11 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Why can't companies be happy with people using their services? Why do they have to "own the user"?
<shaking head>

exformation




msg:765373
 2:24 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

It's interesting to think of information (with Googles mission to 'organise the world's information') as a dynamic quality rather than as a static one, which for me is where they are going with this one.

So, Google maps is for relatively long-lived information, whereas Dodgeball is for very short-lived information.

It must need a really different way of thinking.

Rosalind




msg:765374
 2:45 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Google mainly sells advertising, and personalisation is the way this is evolving.

Think of that scene in Minority Report where Tom Cruise's character is addressed by name by the billboard. Location-based advertising is just another logical step towards this.

HitProf




msg:765375
 3:00 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Can someone in short explain what Dodgeball is? as their site is apparantly overloaded :)

oddsod




msg:765376
 3:08 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

It tells your mates when you're in a pub local to them so they can either buy you drinks ... or quickly move to a different pub.

Brett_Tabke




msg:765377
 3:26 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

> Just a matter of time before we see more
> of these type of things.

Remember that scene in Minority Report where Tom Cruise was automatically recognized by the billboard advertisments and served personalized advertising? That future is going to become a reality much faster than anyone of us will believe.

Everyone grab their copy of Tofflers Future Shock [amazon.com] and reread it again.

philaweb




msg:765378
 3:28 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

> Why can't companies be happy with people using their services? Why do they have to "own the user"?<

"Owning people" is perhaps another way of saying "dependency" or "depend upon"?

Any business that is not a de facto monopoly always has to fear the free will of the customer... ehem, I mean the choice competition is supposed to create.

shri




msg:765379
 3:34 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Lots of cool stuff if one can implement a 4 dimensional search engine.

If you're in a location and you key happy hour into your phone it will tell you where exactly the nearest bars which have happy hours going on.

Extend your crawling technology to personal area broadcasting technology which is bluetooth based.. lots of cool stuff if you can use java enabled phones as crawlers. Seen some cool AGPS tech in some of the newer 3G phones..

Coloring (morphing / changing) of information by operators is a HUGE issue when dealing... phone operators are a lot sneakier than google and their web accelerator.

LeoXIV




msg:765380
 3:43 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Dodgeball can be the perfect extension to orkut!

TomWaits




msg:765381
 3:48 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

There was a Dodgeball competitor mentioned in the current issue of Business 2.0, but I just chucked my copy and I couldn't find the article on their site in the ten seconds I just looked. Anywho, there are other people doing this same thing. G didn't win this one yet.

onlineshrine




msg:765382
 5:55 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Brett: exactly right.

That scene in "Minority Report" is exactly where advertising is headed. That was the thing in the movie that most effected me.

GoogleGuy




msg:765383
 11:00 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

Future Shock is good. Hackers and Painters is good too. If you have an hour or so, the annual stockholders meeting was today. I was in the back of the auditorium to hear some of the questions, and a few of them touched on subjects mentioned here (How long are products in beta for? Does monetization have to be a factor? etc.). I think the meeting was webcast; that would be another way to get a good read on Google looks at projects.

Galtego




msg:765384
 11:05 pm on May 12, 2005 (gmt 0)

It is here: [investor.google.com...] (watching now).

digitalv




msg:765385
 3:54 am on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

I bet marketing companies can't wait until more companies start putting GPS's into their phones like Nextel is doing. Think of it ... spam city. Walking down the street and bam, there's an ad for a shop two blocks away.

No offense to Google or Dodgeball or anything, but the whole thing seems kinda silly. Are people actually doing this? Who walks around town typing text messages of where they are?

walkman




msg:765386
 4:39 am on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

here's a clue to what people like and do:
Paris Hilton is very popular..The Batchelor and all those retarded "shows"
"Who walks around town typing text messages of where they are?"

reseller




msg:765387
 11:26 am on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

I wish Google the best of luck with its new endeavor.

For sure, "Backend Products" are vital for Google business to expand and nourish. However, its the "Google search engine" that the future of Google business depends upon, IMHO. The folks at Google are required to take a critical honest look at the level of quality of their own serps and take actions to improve them.

Also our friend at Google need to reconsider their own level of moral responsibility and ethical conduct whenever launching new applications in future.

Sanenet




msg:765388
 1:29 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

Hey - I just picked up the latest 3G phone from Samsung, and boy does it rock. Seamless integration with the web, so if, for example, I receive a breaking news SMS I can just hit a button and download the associated news video...

This is just the sort of service that I would signup for. Man, I want to know which shops / bars / whatever is having a sale in my area, and then I just want my phone to download a map and send it to my cars gps so I can go there.

badtzmaru




msg:765389
 1:43 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

The thing that is weird is every handset sold in the last few years has been GPS-enabled, it was a requirement for that 911 location service thing mandated by the telecommunications act of whenever. If I look back at old trade journals from the early 2000s, they are hyping geolocation-based services and talking about launches of this and that. Then it all disappears. It's so weird, because I have been thinking for a year that it would be nice to be able to pull up "find nearest" whatever on my phone, yet for some reason none of the "get it now" apps on my Cingular phone support that. Knowing that the GPS location service is provided by a pollable qualcomm box sitting at Cingular, I can't help but wonder why no one has done anything with this recently. It's annoying, because I could do the software side of it, but I don't have the contacts in Cingular to find out what the terms are to be able to access their GPS data.

Even the dodgeball service doesn't use GPS data to tell where you are, you have to manually tell it.

saoi_jp




msg:765390
 2:23 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

This is kind of like "ima hima" in Japan, been out a while. ("ima" = now, "hima" = free time)

digitalv




msg:765391
 5:55 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

The thing that is weird is every handset sold in the last few years has been GPS-enabled, it was a requirement for that 911 location service thing mandated by the telecommunications act of whenever.

I'm not sure what country you're talking about, but it's not the United States. There is no such law or requirement that cellular phones are GPS-enabled here.

walkman




msg:765392
 6:20 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)

"E-911 is the high-tech label for a federal mandate known as Enhanced 911 that requires all US wireless phone companies to begin offering improved location capabilities on their networks. This mandate is a response to a large number of emergency calls being made on cell phones. When 911 emergency calls are made from a landline, an address appears on an operatorís screen. However, if the call comes from a mobile phone, the 911 dispatcher cannot locate the position of the caller. Therefore, the FCC is now requiring wireless companies to accurately locate mobile 911 callers. Carriers will be required to have 100 percent of all new handsets able to provide location information by the end of 2002."
[compukiss.com...]

for now it's only 911 (I can enable /disable, but the cops can probably find out anyway, 911 or not. Videos in our living rooms are next, for our protection of course. You know...just in case someone breaks in the cops can help us.

"I'm not sure what country you're talking about, but it's not the United States. There is no such law or requirement that cellular phones are GPS-enabled here."

badtzmaru




msg:765393
 6:23 pm on May 13, 2005 (gmt 0)


Look at Phase 2 E911 deployment at the FCC's website at [fcc.gov...] (I'm guessing links to govt sites are OK). Although the position of the handheld can be calculated via tower triangulation, every handheld shipped for probably the last 24 months has a GPS receiver in it. When 911 is dialed, the phone sends position information to the mobile carrier. The phones typically let you configure whether it is sent with every call or just with 911 calls. If it's sent with every call, it can be used for geolocation services.

digitalv




msg:765394
 1:00 am on May 14, 2005 (gmt 0)

Well I'll be, I stand corrected. Jeeze, I had no idea ... I thought I had done a better job of keeping up with this kind of stuff.

The thing is though, it can take anywhere from 15 seconds to 2 minutes for a GPS device to be able to connect to all of the satellites required to determine an accurate position. How long does it take for a phone to do it? Would that even be feasible in a 911 call? If you were only on the phone for 30 seconds or a minute its possible they wouldn't be able to pinpoint you.

So is there any way a third party application can access that data? I could have some fun with this :)

Galtego




msg:765395
 1:19 am on May 14, 2005 (gmt 0)

I was dubious . . . thinking of the clear view of the sky I have always needed . . . so I Googled my humble new phone's specs, not expecting to find what I saw listed: GPS.

Marval




msg:765396
 4:01 am on May 14, 2005 (gmt 0)

For those of you that didnt see the 60 minutes special on Google this direction of serving localized results was a small snippet of what I thought at the time was definitley a smart move on googles part - they could recognize what street you were on in Manhatten and direct you to the "best" pizza slice in the area

This 43 message thread spans 2 pages: 43 ( [1] 2 > >
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