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Native language and .EU domain names: Language's role in EU evolution
Are English language OR any language speculative registrations sensible?
Webwork




msg:686185
 5:17 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

Until there's a language called "EU" I find the speculative registration of English .EU domains a bit perplexing. I'm mildly amused by the resale offerings of various "word phrase domains" under the .EU domain. I just don't see the market, but . . . who knows?

Clearly some speculative registrations are less risky: Hotels.EU? Ya. Travel.EU? Wish I owned it. Certain words play nicely even across the ocean and across language barriers.

Has anyone thought about - teased out the role - of language in the evolution of .EU domains?

Is the absence of a unified language in a unified Europe either an impediment or an advantage to the evolution of .EU? The adoption in use of .EU? Especially now that IDNs are taking hold under other TLDs?

Will languge play a unique role in the user adoption or limitation use of this uniquely European domain - .EU?

Unless my focus is pan-European (EU) when - if ever - would I type in Widget.EU versus Widget.fr or Widget.de or Widget.com?

It seems to me that language weighting in decision making will tilt in favor of heading for the ccTLD when someone chooses to type in an address . . but maybe not? Maybe Europeans will default to .EU instead of .com at some point? When? What will it take?

 

OptiRex




msg:686186
 5:47 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

Unless my focus is pan-European (EU) when - if ever - would I type in Widget.EU versus Widget.fr or Widget.de or Widget.com?

....When? What will it take?

An interesting viewpoint however it will pan out industry by industry for their specific requirements.

Without giving too much away I am in the process of constructing a ring of 8 .eu domains. Why am I doing this?

Quite simply my industry uses 7 widget products each one of which has from 500 up to 5,000 primary sources worldwide, note primary as in before even being processed in one of 100,000+ companies worldwide.

Domain #8 will be the .eu directory news site, as opposed to the .com news site, for these 7 widget sites.

The reason for doing it is this:

directorysite.eu - already #1 at .com - brand recognition

widgetsites.eu - instantly recognisable and memorable English name for each sector in the industry and nearly all in the trade know these names globally.

Therefore you can appreciate that when considering purchasing a specific widget that it would be easy for anyone to remember one of their own industry names for a trade site for an immediate quick start with an easy link across to any of the other sites should they require.

So instead of having:

directorysite.eu/widgetsite/

they only have to remember ANY of the widgetsites names.

I have been fortunate enough to get these very nice .eu domain names since the .com's have been taken up by all sorts of non-trade related companies. I also happen to have the .info names which I use for...guess what, technical trade info and also the .biz names which we use for...guess what, business trading and forum boards etc.

Now why would I chose to use .eu when I already have the above?

Quite simply that the "general" USA/Canada widget trade is completely different to the "general" European trade consequently I want to keep them separate.

I hope that briefly explains my rationale.

Anyway, it will be interesting to see how it pans out.

Live_Lead




msg:686187
 8:11 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think generic domains will be even more important in .eu than existing extensions. Maybe it will be a case of thinking widget(english).eu + widget(french).eu + widget(german).eu + widget(spanish.eu etc etc rather than widget.com + widget.net + widget.de +widget.co.uk etc etc

It's a long play that's for sure

Webwork




msg:686188
 9:22 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

If your company does most of it's business in Austria how many languages do you translate your .EU website into? Which languages? All of the EUropean languages? No? You mean you choose to offend some? .EU isn't really about access to or for all of EUrope?

How do you know what language a .EU website is translated into before visiting it? Do that deter casual surfing or a sense of efficient ease in casual surfing of EU websites?

Is .Com any different?

How do you know what country a .EU website relates to? Presumably "all EUropean countries"?

What if, after visiting a few .EU websites, you realize that most are in a native language of the primary business address? Why then bother with the .EU?

It will be interesting to see how .EU works in real life application versus theoretical and policy making realms.

Anyone see signs of the first chinks in the armor . . I mean theory or policy that drove the creation of the .EU domain?

Live_Lead




msg:686189
 9:52 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

It's not that difficult to have your website in most european languages. And most vistors tell you what language they want anyway - so give em what they want!

How do you know what language before you get there?

Probably depends how you get there! If going via a se you prob have a good idea and if you type word(domain) in directly then you probably have a good idea too.

as an example, even as a EU business its pretty much impossible for us to get a .fr for our french sites and many other country extensions are are difficult for us to get as well .eu might be an alternative

OptiRex




msg:686190
 10:15 pm on May 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

How do you know what language a .EU website is translated into before visiting it?

I am very fortunate in that the dominant language worldwide for my trade is English, it has been that way for hundreds, yes I literally mean hundreds, of years.

Consider it this way, the main raw widget suppliers are Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, India, Italy, Russia, South Africa, USA with many supporting roles from Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Argentina etc...

Whilst we all try and learn one another's languages, English is dominant in our commercial widget field therefore it will not come as a very big surprise when visiting my .eu sites that the main pages are in English.

I do not mean that complacently, it's just a fact of business life for me and my trade...and, in fact I do speak seven languages which, in itself is maybe unusual, let alone for a Brit!

Without doubt our widget descriptions will all be completed in ALL known synonyms/language derivations.

jmccormac




msg:686191
 7:41 am on May 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm mildly amused by the resale offerings of various "word phrase domains" under the .EU domain. I just don't see the market, but . . . who knows?
It is classic early market speculation. The trading prices for domains have not been established and there is a lot of iron pyrites domains in the hands of speculators. They are in for some very nasty surprises. It often takes at least 18 months or more before anyone has a realistic idea of the value of a domain.

Has anyone thought about - teased out the role - of language in the evolution of .EU domains?
Yes. I've been looking at the problem of language as it applies to domains in the .eu gTLD and what seems to be emerging is a highly fragmented (along country/linguistic lines) gTLD. This is based on approximately 1.1 Million .eu domains that I've detected here so far.

Will languge play a unique role in the user adoption or limitation use of this uniquely European domain - .EU?
Common generics/numerics will bridge the gaps but as a gTLD it will fragment along country and linguistic lines. The rest will be PPC landing pages, protective registrations and hoarded domains.

Maybe Europeans will default to .EU instead of .com at some point? When? What will it take?
A properly run registry that is selected by a real panel of experts rather than a bunch of EU flunkies who don't understand the domain or hosting business. There is a very real backlash beginning to occur against .eu in some European countries and if anything, the launch of .eu has caused a flight to quality - new customers seem to be more eager to get their ccTLD dom if it is available. The .eu is very far down the list and some hosters now seem to be considering bundling it as a special offer with other domains - not quite the way .info was dumped on the market but as a .cctld/.eu bundle where possible.

There is a rather disturbing element to all this - according to one post I saw yesterday, apparently PwC only validates 1000 domains per day from the Sunrise phases. So most Sunrise 2 applications may not get accepted/approved for months. If this is correct then the level of incompetence associated with this validation process is astounding but all too believable when it comes to the Commission, Eurid and .eu gTLD.

Without that core of quality business domains that are languishing in Sunrise limbo, .eu has no credibility as a gTLD. And the critical aspect of the thing is that these domains are important because they are leader domains - they are the big name companies that the market looks to. So if the market in a particular country does not see these leaders with .eu domains, there is a cascade effect that causes people to associate the gTLD with being just another gimmick domain like .name or a backwater gTLD like .biz or .info. The more I think about this, the more ridiculous the whole .eu gTLD becomes.

Regards...jmcc

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