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This 47 message thread spans 2 pages: 47 ( [1] 2 > >     
How has the addition of new TLDs altered your experience of the WWW?
Biz, .Info, .Travel, .EU.: Notice an improvement to the WWW since their launch?
Webwork




msg:688395
 6:13 pm on Mar 27, 2006 (gmt 0)

I haven't noticed a change.

I haven't noticed an improvement in my experience of the WWW.

Wasn't the addition of new TLDs supposed to have some positive effect on the public?

Wasn't the addition of new TLDs supported or promoted - in part - based upon some idea that there would be benefits?

Anyone care to tell me how the addition of new TLDs has improved your web surfing experience or your experience of the WWW in general?

Wise guys who wish to chime in about how you have made $X as a result of registering new TLDs and reselling them: IS that what was meant by all the declarations and announcements and mission statements and policy statements?

From what I've been reading about the sunshine stage of the .EU launch things are once again devolving to a land grab.

Is that as good as it will ever get with the addition of new TLDs? They same parties jockeying to grab the best real estate? Even if they start to build websites upon the new TLDs do we really advance by having the same persons/entities playing the same game each time?

New TLDs: Useless? Feckless? No net gain, except for domainers?

I say there is no proof that any of the recently added TLDs have accomplished what they were supposedly going to accomplish.

 

Webwork




msg:688396
 6:17 pm on Mar 27, 2006 (gmt 0)

While you've got your thinking caps on, can you imagine any way that the system could be improved, so that the addition of new TLDs actually maximized the advantage of adding new TLDs?

Webwork




msg:688397
 1:16 pm on Mar 28, 2006 (gmt 0)

Your honor, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I rest my case. The addition of new TLDs is the biggest ho-hum event, interesting at best to those in the speculative business.

.EU? Something to get excited about?

Might make sense if a) everyone in the EU spoke the same language - say EUSpeak; and, b) if the regulatory body pulled down all the ccTLDs now operating in the countries that make up the EU.

Maybe in future WebWars the EU will compel all companies to abandon their .Com domains and force them to employ .EU domains? In the great scheme of TLD silliness, including the apparent notions that certain TLDs should enjoy inherent dominance (.Travel for travel, right?), I can foresee such future policymaking.

Live_Lead




msg:688398
 1:31 pm on Mar 28, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think it's possible that .eu might become more important/widely recognised but whatit adds to the everage user i'm not sure

caran1




msg:688399
 5:35 pm on Mar 28, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have got some new websites with a country specific tld and i get traffic much faster. I suppose it helps in SE rankings

encyclo




msg:688400
 2:11 am on Mar 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

From the top boss himself, the web's inventor Tim Berners-Lee:

New Top Level Domains Considered Harmful:
[w3.org...]

The only winners in the new-TLD game are the registrars who profit from protective registrations of all potential TLD-variants. Site owners always lose as a multiplicy of TLDs offers nothing other than additional expense and an increase in the risk of domain confusion and potential misappropriation of their site or company name. End users just end up confused or worse misled.

ccTLDs are of course a different issue, their regionality gives them an advantage, especially when the registration requirements restrict their use for companies or individuals in that particular country (for example .ca or .fr domains).

gpmgroup




msg:688401
 7:36 pm on Mar 29, 2006 (gmt 0)

From the names I have looked at speculation in .eu is far more prevalent than in .info or .biz

There is one company offering to supply a Benelux trademark for a sunrise application within 48 hours.

There are over 400 recently created LLC registars which share the same telephone numbers and don't list a website. Maybe somebody is planning on acquiring a lot of names

[list.eurid.eu...]

jmccormac




msg:688402
 10:08 pm on Mar 31, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are over 400 recently created LLC registars which share the same telephone numbers and don't list a website. Maybe somebody is planning on acquiring a lot of names
There seems to be some good dispute regulations that could be used in the event of squatters being a problem. Though it would not be improbable to see some registrars having their status revoked.

The Pre-Registrations/auctions scam:
[eurid.eu...]

The dispute policy:
[eurid.eu...]

Regards...jmcc

FireHorse




msg:688403
 1:30 pm on Apr 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

.EU will prove, in my view, to be the most pointless waste of time in domain name history, for most business related interests.

As we all know (or should know), there is no "EU language", no "EU Culture", no common "EU systems & procedures" no "EU attitudes" and no common "EU Law".
There are simply too many unmovable & complex variables , that make it impossible to try and create a common theme of such an entity, unlike in the USA or ccTLD where such variables are absent.

I sense that the biggest users of this extension will be political, government groups, EU-wide non-profit organisations and a plethora of special interest/support & niche groups.

Yes of course there will be a huge "land rush" to snap up all those names that haven't been reserved during the sunrise period but in the long run, I think these will largely be a waste of money & effort. The cost to acquire domains with this extension is also a barrier to casual speculators.

We must view this extension more from the point of view of the user and who they will be.

How will web users know when to use the .com version the relevant country code or the .EU version?

Webwork




msg:688404
 3:15 pm on Apr 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

I find the subject of the growing body of TLDs interesting both conceptually and in real time application.

Conceptually, their creation and existance has been argued for or promoted based upon policy statements, assumptions, etc.

Do the rationalizations for the new TLDs hold water?

Has the addition of new TLDs in any way improved or altered the WWW user's experience?

How have the new TLDs altered or improved your experience of the worldwide web?

If there has been no observable improvement - no measurable improvement - then why keep adding TLDs?

How has the addition of the new TLDs made the WWW better - in you experience? How?

I cannot, for the life of me, say the WWW has improved much for all the new TLDs except, perhaps, to the degree that direct navigation combined with actual website development might allow me to find relevant websites faster. HOWEVER, notice how many of those new TLD prime domains are not developed?

So, is allowing speculative registration of new TLDs as they are rolled out a flaw - a major flaw - in the rules of the "let's create a new TLD" game?

[edited by: Webwork at 12:24 pm (utc) on April 3, 2006]

stever




msg:688405
 3:19 pm on Apr 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

Half the reason that they are not developed is that they have been bought to stop domain speculators and associated industry promoters holding existing websites to ransom. EU domains being a prime example.

The only addition they have made to the wellbeing of the www is to add to the bank balances of domain registration companies and domain aftersales auction sites.

jmccormac




msg:688406
 7:25 pm on Apr 1, 2006 (gmt 0)

.EU will prove, in my view, to be the most pointless waste of time in domain name history
AS opposed to .info/.biz/.name/.etc? It will take at least 18-36 months before the success or otherwise of .eu becomes apparent. (That's based on over six years of domain names analysis on a global basis.)

no common "EU Law".
Actually there is. All EU Directives are included within individual state law.

I sense that the biggest users of this extension will be political, government groups, EU-wide non-profit organisations and a plethora of special interest/support & niche groups.
Possibly. But there is a potential market for people to register domains that they could not have registered in other cctlds or gTLDs.

Yes of course there will be a huge "land rush" to snap up all those names that haven't been reserved during the sunrise period but in the long run, I think these will largely be a waste of money & effort. The cost to acquire domains with this extension is also a barrier to casual speculators.
It will not stop the speculators and other types but there is also the possiblity that regulatory pressure could be brought to bear. I don't think that other gTLDs have such strong anti-squatter regulations. If the EurID mob are going to be wimps, then .eu will be just another mess of a gTLD. If they eliminate the squatters and squatter ops, then it will boost public confidence in the gTLD.

How will web users know when to use the .com version the relevant country code or the .EU version?
Advertising and SEO? The same mistakes of chasing after generic domains will be made again but building a good brand is better.

Regards...jmcc

cerebrum




msg:688407
 12:20 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

New comers to the domain industry can get some good domains in ccTLD.

FireHorse




msg:688408
 12:54 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

AS opposed to .info/.biz/.name/.etc? It will take at least 18-36 months before the success or otherwise of .eu becomes apparent. (That's based on over six years of domain names analysis on a global basis.)

The above have been failures for different reasons - but at least they were not woolly, with 100% unspecific idealogy. They did, at least, make a good attempt at communicating the idea behind each suffix in their actual suffix.
They also had global appeal (albeit in English), which .EU does not have.
Which language will .EU be in?
Is every country happy with the choice?

What is lessons.eu telling someone?
What is tomatoes.eu telling someone?
What is cars.eu telling someone?

Actually there is. All EU Directives are included within individual state law.

There may be EU directives, but as any educated person will know, each EU country functions on its own laws and within its own jurisdictions, largely outside EU involvement. Also France, the country upon which the EU was modelled on, BOOTED OUT the latest EU referendum last year, which hardly inspires confidence in the future of the actual EU, let alone an meaningless internet suffix that no-one will care about in less than 2 years time.

hannamyluv




msg:688409
 1:15 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Well, I can tell you personally that I just don't trust any domain that wasn't among the originals. Why, because I have yet to find a darn one that had anything other than spammy garbage on them.

The mistake was adding TLDs without any sorts of rules. And maybe they can't have rules (because it would restrict a million things), but they would have had a better launch of them if they could.

Like, you have to have a website up on one in the next 6 months that contains more than a generated, ad laden, shoddy page.

Legimite people now won't touch them because either A) the good ones have been bought by people who aren't going to jack with them except sit on them for profit (which won't come about because no one will buy them) or B) because they don't want to be associated with the garbage that has appeared on them.

jmccormac




msg:688410
 1:32 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

The above have been failures for different reasons - but at least they were not woolly, with 100% unspecific idealogy. They did, at least, make a good attempt at communicating the idea behind each suffix in their actual suffix.
Yes but all new domains are up against the problem of .com - that's why the new domains really did not do so well. Domain registrations tend to move in this order:
.com - .cctld - .net - .org - .info/.biz

or where the cctld is stronger:

.cctld - .com - .net - .org - .info/.biz

They also had global appeal (albeit in English), which .EU does not have.
Which language will .EU be in?
True but the .eu gTLD is meant to have pan- European appeal.

Is every country happy with the choice?
Probably not.

There may be EU directives, but as any educated person will know, each EU country functions on its own laws and within its own jurisdictions, largely outside EU involvement.
EU law now apparently takes precedence over national state law in the EU. All EU directives have to be enacted in state law within 9 months or so.

let alone an meaningless internet suffix that no-one will care about in less than 2 years time.
It will take at least that long to see if it will be meaningless. That's why it is unwise to write it off so early. Though with the number of bottom feeders and PPC parasites that it will attract, it will be interesting to see how EUrid will police the gTLD.

Regards...jmcc

JollyK




msg:688411
 3:32 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think the addition of .biz and .info has been really great for the spam industry. Probably half the spam I get (that doesn't list a Geocities address) uses a .biz or .info domain. Honestly, where would spam be today if it weren't for the_best_drugs_pharmacy_really_honest.biz and get_viagra_and_she_will_love_you.info?

The only real interest I have in .eu is that I think an amusing biology education website could be made with, you know, pictures of dissected frogs and so forth, called "ThatsGross.EU" (That's gross! Ew!) But then, that's coming from a person who was hoping for Iraq to open up so I could get High.IQ . heh

Other than that, I don't see any improvement other than that perhaps a small business who couldn't get their .com due to domain speculators can at least get a .biz. Maybe. If the speculators don't have that as well.

Meh.

Color me not impressed.

JK

Jeremy_H




msg:688412
 4:17 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm just thinking how websites that serve the larger area would benefit, if they move into that direction.

I'm thinking something like Amazon.eu, instead of Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.de, Amazon.at, Amazon.fr...

All their branding, and other energies can go into focusing on just one Amazon site what wouldn't show a country bias (as if they had picked their .co.uk site to represent all of Europe for example). They really couldn't have done this before. (Unless, I guess, if they had moved everything to their .com site, but that wouldn't show any regional connections).

And, I know, there are lots of different languages in Europe, but, the company already has experience with a multiple language site like their English/French Amazon.ca.

Then, if they establish an Amazon.eu site, moving into new territories, let's say Italy, or Spain, would be much easier. They would just have to expand their site, instead of having to develop a whole new Amazon.it or Amazon.es.

nedguy




msg:688413
 5:12 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I specialise in the travel industry.

I think I've only once seen a .aero and despite the hype from the .travel registrar (they've been particularly busy at trade exhibitions and in the trade press) I don't sense any real enthusiasm from agents and operators to adopt it. Most feel they 'have to' rather than 'want to'.

Webwork




msg:688414
 5:34 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I don't sense any real enthusiasm from agents and operators to adopt it. Most feel they 'have to' rather than 'want to'.

What an interesting observation. I have a nagging sense I've come across this paradigm before.

Oh yeah, the fashion industry. Domain fashion, anyone? "Oh, that .com domain is soooo yesterday. Don't you know? Everyone who is anyone is using .travel!" MMB Make Me Barf

A very interesting statement. What happens if the industry pushes back? "Take your .travel domain and stick it in your promotional pen holder. I'm sticking with .com". But . . but . . everyone is doing it, everyone who is anyone is going .travel. You're going to be left behind, become irrelevant, if you don't use .travel.

Reminds me of another new TLD.

Dot Pro anyone?

Is .travel really a service to the travel industry or is it simply someone's money making idea? TLD = instant business, I daresay a potential monopoly. No, of course not, the .travel TLD was created to serve the travel industry. You know, the industry didn't have a TLD they could use before.

Okay, they didn't have a TLD that said "We meet the following standards. We are legitimate."

I wonder what the recent registration of some hundred or so city/travel domains by a single entity says about the robustness of that standard. "Hey, I'm a travel writer, so I should get NewYork.travel, Paris.travel, etc."?

I think that registrars run the peril of needing to turn over inventory and turn a profit, which leads to shifting standards.

I could have sworn I saw a number of .Pro domains for sale on the aftermarket recently. What ever happened to a requirement of professional licensing?

Next up in the process: "Hey, we don't like your travel site. We're going to pull your .travel domain." Possible? Of course not, no registrar would ever do that, right? Anyone know any registrars that pull down or threaten to pull down domains?

Three years from now: "Hey, we're not making the money we think we should be making or we need to improve the system (maybe upgrade our offices) so we're going to ramp up the cost of your .travel domain." Since there's only 1 "official" .travel domain there's a soft monopoloy, isn't there?

Next up: Official letters from the new TLD operators to Google, et. al.: "Dear Google: We, of the .travel industry, would prefer that you offer a search bias for .travel domains"? No letter needed, right? The .travel extension by itself will be a signal of quality that a SE will have to consider?

(NewsFlash, circa 2009) "Today the .travel registry announced that people need never again search for travel information by using the Google search engine. Effective today each and every travel website of any real authority or professional quality (IOHO) is indexed in the .travel TLD and can be found in the .travel directory or search engine."

The new and improved WWW. Brought to you by the addition of new TLDs.

Right?

gpmgroup




msg:688415
 7:11 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think some people feel getting a .whatever gTLD approved is a license to print money.

A lot of the money new Registries stand to make comes from existing businesses forced to protect their existing brands. Therefore the approval of future gTLDs should look very carefully at who benefits, and if there isn't clearly demonstratable benefit for people outside the Registry and its Registrars, ICANN should not approve new applications.

Any contracts for new gTLDs also need to be well written as there is a temptation for applicants to promise all manner of things to get approval. Once the approval is granted and economic realities set in [People want to be in the .com space] ways / schemes are sought to get around the regulations to get more revenue [registrations] in.

AhmedF




msg:688416
 9:56 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

Not including ccTLDs, I can say that .info .biz etc have all been a bust in North America. Unfortunately they seem to have been a haven for spammers. Yech

But I think that is as far as it goes.

In Germany, .infos are big. .info is also big in other countries. And as for those knocking .com - .eu could be possibly used by European companies as their umbrella domain. Instead of using .com and then .com/country1 and .com/country2, .eu could be used instead.

Have most of the extensions failed? Sure. But they are doing okay outside of the US.

danny




msg:688417
 10:34 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

As we all know (or should know), there is no "EU language", no "EU Culture", no common "EU systems & procedures" no "EU attitudes" and no common "EU Law".

What's with all the uninformed EU-bashing?

The EU is linguistically less diverse than India or Papua New Guinea. There's a fair bit of European-wide popular culture - popular music, sport, etc. And there are oodles and oodles of common EU systems and procedures, and a number of influential EU courts.

imstillatwork




msg:688418
 11:24 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

New TLDs? Lame.
Orginazationaly, might make sense. but in reality... avarage joe doesn't know there should be a difference between mysite.com and mysite.eu and mysite.web or anything else. Makes it MORE difficult for the ned user to find a GOOD relevent site, when we just double the ammount of same domain names like that...

gregbo




msg:688419
 11:31 pm on Apr 3, 2006 (gmt 0)

I followed the IFWP process years ago during all the furor about new TLDs. However, now that we have them I don't think they matter very much (except to registrars who perhaps made a little bit of money off of them).

moishe




msg:688420
 1:47 am on Apr 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

To answer Webworks original question:

The addition of new TLDs has not altered my experience at all, er, well, maybe not much...

The only domain TLDs that I see as any different are .gov .mil .edu as they are restricted in so far as who can get them. If I see a .edu site, I am fairly confident that it belongs to an accredited institution of learning, etc.

All other domains are just that, other domains. Be it a .com, .net, .org, .biz, .info, .us or whatever, to me they are just like Main St., Main Rd., Main Ave, just a way to create more real estate. I will admit that I do prejudge sites a bit based on their TLDs, I live in the States and would not be as likely to order from a .co.uk website as I would a .com simply because I wish to avoid overseas shipping and currency issues, but thats just me. Also, I tend to be a bit suspicious of any .biz, .info and .us sites but I don't discount them any more than I automatically trust .com sites.

nedguy




msg:688421
 11:14 am on Apr 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

>>>
(NewsFlash, circa 2009) "Today the .travel registry announced that people need never again search for travel information by using the Google search engine. Effective today each and every travel website of any real authority or professional quality (IOHO) is indexed in the .travel TLD and can be found in the .travel directory or search engine"
>>>

No need to wait till 2009, Webwork, that's already part of Tralliance Corp's grand scheme.

There's also, on their website (which is on the World Wide Web at tralliance dot travel) a pdf press release answering exactly the points we've been making in this thread.

Lisa




msg:688422
 7:40 pm on Apr 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

This thread was started with a negative slant. Ignorance of EU culture and how they will use .EU is horrible, it makes Americans look bad to judge so quick something they personally don't understand.

This is the best TLD since .COM! Not better then .COM but close.

.EU will be the second largest TLD in less then 7 years. Everyone in Europe that missed getting their ccTLD will try to get an .EU instead. You are really missing out not looking into .EU. If you are an American, well the only interest you would have as an investment or as leverage to get into the European market. From a European perspective, this is HUGE!

Martin40




msg:688423
 10:08 pm on Apr 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

What's with all the uninformed EU-bashing?

If I gave an honest answer to that, my message would be politely edited.

In the long run one of the effects of .eu will probably be that .com will be perceived as an American domain, not as the primary generic domain it is now.

To see everything from the user's perspective is nice and politically-search-engine correct, but let's not forget the site owner. If the CEO of Airbus is happy with airbus.eu, then give the guy a break, that's what I say. It are the site owners that give the net it's content, do they have any say in this?

Also, my experience is that people react more positive to a premium domain with an exotic TLD than to a farfetched .com. Believe me, there is life beyond .com.

FireHorse




msg:688424
 11:06 pm on Apr 4, 2006 (gmt 0)

It is not uninformed euro bashing to point out clear facts about this multi-faceted and complicated political entity. If we just "wooped up" every idea that came along "to give it a fighting chance", then we would deserve all the fallout we got when it went belly up.

I remain critical of the .EU development and stand by my views expressed before which I believe will stand the test of time.

I am not American and not all Europeans love Europe or the EU.

Perhaps the internet authorities worldwide, with help from technology companies, should be spending their attention and huge resources on protecting the existing net infrastructure from all kinds of criminal & undesirable activity, eliminating spam (charging for bulk email?) and generally improving this fantastic and world-changing electronic phenomenon, which is a million miles away from the magnificent entity it could be.

By focusing on developing more and more domain suffixes instead of other important needs, the questionable priorities of those in charge is clearly communicated to the world - that of a money-grabbing outlook.

We were all fed the hype 3 years ago to "rush" into buying chinese domain names with the .CN suffix. "Tap into the world's biggest market potential!" etc, etc. Apart from easily recognisable generic terms (most of which were pre-registered by large domain holders), 99% of these domains were, and still are, essentially worthless for targetting the enormous Chinese population, 95%+ of whom will never come into contact with the English language in their lifetimes.
In addition, IDN's will in my view, soon take over all ASCII domains pertaining to non-ASCII based languages and cultures.

.EU is even less clear that .CN, except for the groups that I identified in previous posts and some that have been identified by other members.

This 47 message thread spans 2 pages: 47 ( [1] 2 > >
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