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Food for thought 1: Domain drop catching
It's not just about words
Webwork




msg:690011
 1:57 pm on Jul 20, 2005 (gmt 0)

There was a massive .Org domain drop recently. Thousand and thousands of English "word domains". Far more than usual.

Actually, lots and lots of -ing, -ed, -ness, -ly word domains.

When you see or become aware of something like this - a big "word drop" - happening or about to happen you need to ask yourself a few questions.

1. If the domains are valuable why is someone allowing them to drop?

Draw the rational inference: If there was value to them someone would find a way somehow to secure their renewal.

2. Of the #### domains that are about to drop, do any of them have a significant, direct commercial connection? (A thought I'll expound upon in a later thread.)

I scanned about 6,000 domains, a small part of the total drop. After years of practice, I can blow through such a list in very little time, thankfully.

Of those 6,000 I selected about 40. Of the 40 there's likely only ~10 that stand a reasonable chance of showing a return worth any creative effort.

In order for this to be worth the effort and expense, those 10 domains have to pay for the registration fees for the 40, plus the time spend culling out those 40 domains, plus the time spent developing them, bandwidth, etc.

So why did I even bother registering the other 30?

Haste. Things look a bit different the morning after the night before.

Note: 40/6,000 = <1% of the "word drops". Even though the other 5,960 were "word domains" I just looked and lamented for someone else's loss. Sad, really.

Another "someone else", who looks to be relatively new to the domain drop game, (at least their WhoIs record appears to be new to the game) went to the trouble to register a very large percentage of the remaining domains. History repeating itself? Likely. If the remaining words had "juice" he wouldn't have been "so lucky".

Point of the story? Take your time. Having money to buy domains is not the same as making money from domains. Often the excitement of making a move is following by a reality of disappointment.

The aftermarket for the vast majority of -ing or -ly .Org domains is nil, this class of domains gets very little - if any - type in traffic, and of that traffic the likelihood of any clickthroughs converting is very likely near nil.

There is often a message carried by a dropped domain.

999 times out of 1000 the message is "I'm not a contender."

Widgetingness.org anyone?

 

Glamba




msg:690012
 5:56 am on Jul 21, 2005 (gmt 0)

In fact those "monster drops" are one of the the best places to find out what kind of undeveloped domain names have no market value.

jmccormac




msg:690013
 5:21 am on Jul 23, 2005 (gmt 0)

Actually, lots and lots of -ing, -ed, -ness, -ly word domains.
These are a lot harder to brand and market.

1. If the domains are valuable why is someone allowing them to drop?
The smart reply would be that a domain is only valuable if someone will pay for it. The problem with a lot of these domains is that they were pure dictionary attacks without any thought given to their eventual marketability.

2. Of the #### domains that are about to drop, do any of them have a significant, direct commercial connection? (A thought I'll expound upon in a later thread.)
I've been correlating .com/net/org/biz/info domain to website correlation for the last week or so. This is basically checking if each .com/net/org/biz/info domain has an associated website and identifying where that website is hosted. The typical figure quoted for domain utilisation in the gTLDs is around 70%. From the figures so far, I think that that might be a bit optimistic. There are some IPs with thousands of associated websites - these are often the holding/parking sites for the large and not so large hosters.

Of those 6,000 I selected about 40. Of the 40 there's likely only ~10 that stand a reasonable chance of showing a return worth any creative effort.
From this, it sounds like the aftermath of a speculative bubble. The patterns in domain ebb and flow are long term (yearly rather than daily). But .org still does not have the cachet of .com for marketing.

Sometimes the message from a dropped domain is just great expectations smashed by reality. A classic explanation of a speculative bubble. But I've already seen spammers promoting the .eu gTLD even though it has not gone live yet. What are the chances that all these mistakes will be repeated again?

There may well be a massive drop on .info as a lot of the freebie .info registrations expire. The .info is an artificially inflated gTLD.

Regards...jmcc

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