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Domain Names Forum

    
Found name and it's available, but..
it's not related to the site topic at all
Tapolyai




msg:688104
 6:05 pm on Feb 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

I found a domain name, all .com, .net and .org available, it is pronouncable, short (6 chars), when I asked 12 people they all wrote it the same way, and it does stick in peoples' mind (after 12 people test).

Problem or is it? - it has absolutely nothing to do with the topic of the site.

Example: Site is about ...say... stapler repair, and the name is ...cookiedough. Stapler repair has nothing to do with ...say... "cookiedough"... (Yes, I am looking at my stapler while eating cookiedough.)

Is this going to be an issue down the road?

I have read here that domain names with keywords are no longer of importance (or they never were we just didn't know better).

Thoughts?

This is my first attempt to deploy a commercial site, so I want to do it on the right foot.

 

mcguffin




msg:688105
 6:27 pm on Feb 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

Tapolyai,

There's a computer company that's well known for its ability to create stylish computers and now also trendy personal audio gear. The company's name and its icon are related to a certain fruit.

You can build a brand name by taking a word using it in a new context, just like that computer company did.

  • "Cookiedough" brand cookiedough won't really be memorable to consumers. The brand name is the same as the type of product.

  • "Cookiedough" brand cookies improves the distinctiveness, but the brand name is still pretty weak. It is very descriptive of the entire product category. It'd be the same as "Chewy" brand cookiedough.

  • "Cookiedough" brand stapler repair is pretty distinctive. You've just made a word association that most people wouldn't make. Unless they're staring at a broken stapler and simultaneously munching on cookiedough.

    Using "cookiedough" as a keyword in your domain name isn't going to help you for SEO, but it might help you build a brand.

    In many countries, the strongest brand names are invented words. However, existing words used in new and unique ways can also create very strong brand names.

    If people can pronounce the name and spell it consistently, and the domain is still available, you've gone a long way down the research path. I'd also suggest a quick check of your country's online trademark database (if there is one).

  • Tapolyai




    msg:688106
     8:53 pm on Feb 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

    I am not going to use the name as a SEO piece.

    In a twisted way... the name can somehow be fudged to relate to the topic.

    Checked Trademark for singular & plural, live and dead. None.

    Registred .com, .net and .org.

    Thanks!

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