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Learning HTML
Where is the best tutorial
coconubuck




msg:612388
 7:41 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Hello. I want to learn HTML and dont really know where to go. Where would you recommend I go to get the best tutorial for what I am looking for? Thanks!

 

tedster




msg:612389
 7:52 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Some of the best tutorials are at [w3schools.com...]

There you can learn (for free) standards compliant HTML, CSS and more. I've seen a lot of information in various HTML lessons that was dead wrong. This is a great place to start out on the right foot.

One of the nicest features are their example boxes. You put your trial code in one box and immediately see the result in another.

[edited by: tedster at 7:56 pm (utc) on May 23, 2003]

coconubuck




msg:612390
 7:55 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Thanks Tedster, I will go there and start learning tonite. I appreciate your help.

vaxop




msg:612391
 9:17 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

dont bother learning it
download dreamweaver

coconubuck




msg:612392
 9:33 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Vaxop, I was told the best way to learn was to start with HTML and then work up to dreamweaver as an editing tool. Wont I miss something important by skipping learning HTML first and then using dreamweaver?

papabaer




msg:612393
 9:43 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Forget Dreamweaver... roll up your sleeves and dive into code. It's the only way to learn.

Sinner_G




msg:612394
 9:43 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Yes, you will skip learning HTML.

Sinner

coconubuck




msg:612395
 9:48 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

I am most concerned with learning the basics and working up from there. I have heard from many people that using Dreamweaver is not the way to go if you are learning, as you will skip learning many important things that you dont want to miss out on. I want to have a solid background by the time I am finished. Are there any programs that anyone would recommend after I learn HTML, or do you recommend doing everything by hand?

papabaer




msg:612396
 9:49 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

And actually, you will not "work up" to Dreamweaver, you will leave it behind.

coconubuck




msg:612397
 9:54 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

Sorry for so many questions. It seems like the best way to go is to stay away from programs such as Dreamweaver. I definitely want to be able to create very professionally. Knowing the basics is important, I am sure.

jatar_k




msg:612398
 9:57 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

100% right coconubuck,

I started hand coding and never looked back. All I know about software programs is that their code isn't as good as mine. It also takes me longer to clean up after them than to do it by hand.

If you learn about what it is trying to do for you then you won't need it to do it. ;)

bugsy2334




msg:612399
 10:01 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

I think it depends on how you like to learn and what your short term goals are.

If you need a site and you need it quick, use the programs like dreamweaver or frontpage.

By using the programs, you can begin to get a sense of the coding and learn from there. The programs put a lot of extra code in your pages that you dont need, but after you've done a few pages, you will beign to learn the html and be able to hand code the pages.

I'm no pro yet, but thats how I learned, and it was easier for me to learn this way.

coconubuck




msg:612400
 10:05 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

That is exactly what I want to do. I dont want something to offer me shortcuts that arent nearly as good as what I could do on my own. Thanks for your advice everyone, I will start studying HTML and go from there. I appreciate everyone's input.

papabaer




msg:612401
 10:08 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

What can be most harmful is when a program has so many feaures it "handles" all the work for you and prevents you from truly learning...

Look for a good HTML Text editor... and then use it to manage your code and pages.. and as in th ecase of HTML TIDY, perform a preliminary clean-up before you check you validate your code at the W3.org validator (there are others).

I use Homesite which is now built into DW, but I still write ALL of my code by hand. This includes all of my CSS which I write using notepad. For me, Homesite is a good file and site management program. Advanced find and replace is useful. But for code? All by hand..

You can find excellent, free programs such as HTML-Kit and 1stPage 2000, which will allow you to write code while still providing most, if not all, of the site management features of DW or FP.

Make the W3.org your number one resource. LEARN, LEARN, LEARN... VALIDATE, VALIDATE, VALIDATE! Soon it will all become clear.. and second nature. you will thank yourself for it.

Sinner_G




msg:612402
 10:32 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

yes, go to W3. And if you have questions, well, you know where to find us :).

WebJoe




msg:612403
 10:37 pm on May 23, 2003 (gmt 0)

papabear, my words.

HOw will one understand the error messages of a validator if on eused apps like DW from the beginning?

And from what i've seen DW still produces some "crappy" HTML.

Coconut, once you understand HTML it's probably handier to use a tool like DW (or any of the many others available) to manage your site. But myself, I still end up cleaning up the code manually in a basic text editor.

coconubuck




msg:612404
 8:51 pm on May 27, 2003 (gmt 0)

You guys are awesome! Thanks for all your help.

John_Caius




msg:612405
 10:56 am on May 28, 2003 (gmt 0)

I found this site useful when I was a *complete* beginner:

www.weballey.net

Very clear explanation of the absolute basics.

NB: Its website promotion information is out of date - e.g. search engine submission is pretty obsolete now as you just need an incoming link from another already indexed site.

WebJoe




msg:612406
 7:16 pm on May 28, 2003 (gmt 0)

Some othe rreferences I personally use quite often:

www.htmlhelp.com
www.selfhtml.com

TheWebographer




msg:612407
 7:43 pm on May 28, 2003 (gmt 0)

Once you become an expert in handcoding HTML you can dump DreamWeaver and FrontPage and all those WYSIWYG editors. They will only slow you up.

Set yourself apart from the common herd - learn to handcode and you can make ANYTHING on a website.

If you use DreamWeaver or FrontPage you are stuck being able to do only what they can do - and probably make horrible code too.

natty




msg:612408
 9:50 pm on May 28, 2003 (gmt 0)

coming from another relative newbie to all this writing html that validates. :)
Dreamweaver MX nicely suggests and ends tags for you in the hand coding bit, no worry about missing closing tags, or the other annoying things like that, it also suggests fillers for tags too. saves alot of time.
helpfull for me, until i start remembering it all.
w3schools was also a great help.
and here of course, a wealth of knowledge..

WebJoe




msg:612409
 5:24 pm on May 30, 2003 (gmt 0)

Webographer


If you use DreamWeaver or FrontPage you are stuck being able to do only what they can do - and probably make horrible code too.

I only partly agree with that. As I stated earlier, I suggest that one learns to write html manually before diving into a wysiwyg editor.

But at the moment I draft pages and manage sites in FP, but rewrite a lot of the html, because it is horrible code that doesn't validate and most of the time almost unreadable because of unnecessary line breaks etc.

Rougy




msg:612410
 5:32 pm on Jun 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

I think the best way to learn HTML is to start a site of your own, and just bash away at it.

Code cannibalism is also hightly recommended.

If you see a site that is doing things that you think are cool and would like to incorporate, take a peek at their source code and you'll learn more than any tutorial could ever teach you.

It's also a "targeted" form of learning, you teach yourself what you need to know, when you need to know it.

Ciao.

takagi




msg:612411
 6:10 pm on Jun 6, 2003 (gmt 0)

Nice reference for HTML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, VBScript, etc can be found at:

www.devguru.com

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