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This 96 message thread spans 4 pages: 96 ( [1] 2 3 4 > >     
When you're off the rat race, what's life like?
for those who are doing good with AM...
rfung




msg:546206
 7:17 pm on Sep 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

This is mostly off topic to the nitty gritty of AM - just curious about the relatively well off to the filthy rich of us here, and anyone in between, how is your lifestyle without a 9-5? how has it changed life for you, or what do you do with all this time you have now, or now that you're no longer associated to society by what job you have (you know, how in the US you are what your job is).

When you're off the rat race, what's life like?

:)

 

GuitarZan




msg:546207
 8:17 pm on Sep 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hey,

Thanks for asking questions that I would like to know too Rfung!

I wish I knew what it was like, but I know that I will soon enough.

C.K.

guitaristinus




msg:546208
 10:39 am on Sep 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

I haven't had an employer for a little over 4 years. It's like you might imagine being retired is like. I have some woods behind my house I walk in everyday. I take afternoon naps about everyday. I take vacations whenever. I read books on whatever my interest is for the week. I play guitar and the few friends I have are also into music. I spend maybe five hours/day working on my websites. Today I have some errands to run - bank, groceries and library. Need to clean the toilet.

The "rat race" includes a lot of things besides having to "go to work". Competition (between individuals, nations, religions, schools, cities, et al) is a big part of the race. Consumerism is another big part.

donovanh




msg:546209
 2:48 pm on Sep 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

> I take afternoon naps about everyday. I take vacations whenever.

Sounds awesome :D

mfishy




msg:546210
 2:54 pm on Sep 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

<<I take afternoon naps about everyday. I take vacations whenever.>>

That about sums it up although I alternate between the local watering hole and naps in the afternoon :)

rfung




msg:546211
 12:26 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

okaay...:)

do you find yourselves with way too much time on your hands now that 8-9 hours of regular joe's working life is not your concern?

By no means I've experienced, but oft times when I was on vacation, I'd wake up at 11am, eat lunch, watch tv, do whatever, surf the net, and generally not be very productive. Granted it was vacations, and maybe the mindset makes all the difference. A respite from working life.

eljefe3




msg:546212
 12:47 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

After about 2 years of basically checking sales, collecting checks and outsourcing work done, I've actually thought about putting in a few more hours to work on some new internet projects. Most of my free time in the last two years has been taken up with beach sports and dabbling in real estate.

sadelb




msg:546213
 1:03 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

i feel like im so far off :(.... one day... one day....

universetoday




msg:546214
 4:35 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

I've got two young kids, so I've decided to stay home with my wife and help raise them. I work four hours a day in the morning. That keeps my website maintained, and fulfills my commitments, but doesn't necessarily grow it much beyond its normal word-of-mouth, organic growth.

I don't make a lot of money, but it's enough that my website covers our monthly expenses as long as we don't get too crazy. And that's just me working four hours a day.

My big plan is to get everything working so well virtually that I can maintain the website from anywhere on Earth. Then we can do a lot of traveling, and I can still maintain my career.

I never plan to retire, in fact, I often wish I had more time to work on my site, but then, getting to know your kids is important too. I'm glad I picked a topic area that I'm absolutely thrilled about. I rarely have trouble getting myself charged up to work on my site.

Michael Anthony




msg:546215
 4:48 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm supposedly reitired - heaven knows I have more than enough, but here I am at the crack of dawn posting on here - why?

In a nutshell, my sites and projects excite me. My friends in the industry are highly stimulating and I LOVE learning from others. It's also much easier to get stuff done before the phone starts ringing, etc.

My wife says that I only have online friends and to an extent that's true - but when u work from home in your bathrobe you tend not to meet too many people n the course of your work.

I know I'll stop learning one day - the day I die. Until then, my hobby is aff marketing but my priorities are my health and my family.

And the biggest benefit of being where I am today? Being able to wake up every day and ask myself "Where do I want to go today?"

p.s. Dear Mr. Gates, please don't sue me!

antoine




msg:546216
 8:08 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)


Hmmm, I go to bed and get up at whatever hour I want. Today was 3pm, but usualy it's not that extreme.

I work however many hours I want, sometimes it's none, sometimes 12 hours. For example, I can work for 2 hours first thing in the morning, read for an hour, go for a drive, come back and work some more, meet someone for coffee, etc.

I take vacations when I want. This can be a roadtrip or somewhere nice. I have a policy that I do not take my laptop with me, nor do I plug into the internet while on a trip. If all my sites go down, so be it, I'm on vacation.

I take sick days when I want, those usualy involve watching movies, reading, and playing video games until I get better.

Not too sure what else there is to add. As for finding myself with too many hours in a day, never happens. I personally find the days are always too short to do everything I want.

I used to feel bad that I could do this while the people I know worked long days for very little pay. I can sometimes earn more in a day of not working than some people do in a month. Truth is these people are not lazy when it comes to working, but for some reason they are unable or unwilling to learn something new. I have tried teaching them what I know, and unless I do everything for them and they get immediate results within 48 hours they are not happy. I really dont understand the mindset of these people, especially since I offer them a doorway out of poverty, but some people do not want to better themselves. Obviously if you are on this forum and are asking questions this does not apply to you. Please do not get the impression that I am putting anyone down on this forum.

Antoine

rfung




msg:546217
 8:36 am on Sep 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

antoine:

I've often felt that there's enough business out there that once I get high up I would help folks out getting started in AM and offer them a 'way out' of the rat race. As I tell my (future ex-) co-workers about my intentions and the money I'm making now and the potential, they sort of glaze over and apparently can't seem to understand that this could radically change their lives, if only they willed themselves to put some hours into this to get it started. There's just no interest (or maybe I'm a real bore :)). And these are technical people as well, so...

As far as help, I'm sure there's plenty of interested parties here that would love to hear from you, and I'll be the first one to voice it, and in public at that, since you'll prolly be swamped with private messages, that anytime you wish to dispense advice, you'll find willing and eager ears this way, just PM me!

Thanks all of you affiliate pros who shared some insight in the life of the rich (but not famous). Compared to getting riches the normal way, working in AM has the peculiar trait that we work from home, and we probably have a lot less responsabilities work wise than other folk. I mean some rich people work 60+ hours a week, but not AM'ers. I guess that's what got all of us into this industry in the first place. A more well rounded lifestyle.

aleksl




msg:546218
 12:03 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

good topic

Sometimes I wish I had my 8-9-hour a day job back.
I often work well past bedtime.

Again, it's been only 6 months since I am in this mess :)
And I am sure not about to give it up.
Playing tennis in the mid-afternoon, and reading a book outside in the late morning with a cup of coffee sure beats suffocating in the cubicle under a out-of-your-bosses-arse deadline.

For those who occasionally drop gold nuggets in this forum - thank you, I am your biggest fan.

rfung




msg:546219
 12:33 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

How about you guys' social lives? if you're married with kids it may not matter much, but for single folks(and lets face we're mostly guys here?:))....

these days a big part of your social life centers about the chitchat and inane banter you do at work, so, but take that away, now that you're available during normal work hours to do as you please, most other regular life folks aren't, so who are you going to socialize with?...

I've thought once I reach a level where I can just work a couple hours a day, I'd take on some menial job just for the opportunity to be 'out there' ... always wanted to try my hand at a McJob...lol.

hannamyluv




msg:546220
 12:43 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

always wanted to try my hand at a McJob

Aw man, don't do that to yourself. If you want a menial job just to meet people, go the coffee shop barista route. The customers and conversation are much more stimulating.

Teshka




msg:546221
 12:59 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Today, I rolled out of bed around 6:30 (I used to sleep til whenever I woke up but find I just feel better overall when I get up at the same time every day). Watched the cnn fiancial channel, answered some email, went rollerblading, met my mother for a movie (Wimbleton, cute chick flick ;), got home around 2:30 and "worked" for about two hours. I might do some more later if I feel ambitious.

The best part is just being able to go outside on nice weekdays or take breaks of whatever length whenever you want.

these days a big part of your social life centers about the chitchat and inane banter you do at work

It's funny that people always bring this up when they find out I work from home. Like there's this assumption that I sit at home alone in front of my computer 24-7. The truth of it is when you work from home and don't work as much as employee types, you have a lot more time to devote to other activities which can certainly be social.

Just for example, I
...take at least one class a quarter
...belong to a master's swim team
...take fencing lessons
...have a couple of exercise buddies I meet regularly
...host a D&D game once a week (Yeah, just when I had everyone convinced I wasn't a geek... ok, maybe no one was convinced).

Teshka




msg:546222
 1:01 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

If you want a menial job just to meet people, go the coffee shop barista route. The customers and conversation are much more stimulating.

Heh, volunteering is good, too, I hear. I'm more of a send a check kind of person though :P

rfung




msg:546223
 1:23 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

...I don't doubt that all of you find something to do with the extra time you have...

but...

If I were not to have a 9-6 job I wouldn't have anyone to hang out with during that time because everyone I know works! I reckon I could take some fun classes at jc and mingle with the student folks... :) or maybe I need to find fellow AM'ers in the same situation...

createErrorMsg




msg:546224
 1:36 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

go the coffee shop barista route. The customers and conversation are much more stimulating

Are you kidding me? Coffee shop patrons are the same patrons you get at any menial, mind-numbing, soul-crushing, self-esteem leaching job on the planet. And while it might be nice that you work at a *tarbucks, as opposed to, say, a *urger *ing (at least it smells better), at the end of the day you're still shlepping food, mopping floors and cleaning up after slobs who regularly drop your hourly pay on a single cup of coffee without batting an eye.

(I worked at a coffee shop many years ago, if you didn't pick that up.)

I'm curious how you stay-at-homers deal with feeling secure in your finances. I make some money on the side doing freelance design, but my day job keeps my family insured, builds up a decent 403b, and guarantees that the bills are paid. I may feel like backing the car over my own head everyday, but at least I don't have to worry about whether or not I'll be able to pay the medical bill afterwards. ;)

tsinoy




msg:546225
 2:36 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hey this is a great thread! well I'm one those you guys are talking about... a fairly tecky guy still working 8-9hrs/day hehe... I've been working for about 9 years... good lord I don't believe its been that long already... I'm almost ready to quit! :) if only I have income to pay the bills...

anyways.. I did found out about AM just 1.5 months ago... and what the possibilities are... actually.. its more on - where do I begin .... I started adwords promotion didn't do very well and still not doing well... so I've started building some website that I'm interested in, still learning to build quality contents.

do you guys have any general advice for a newbie? what things you would do when you were starting if you only know what you know now.... type of advice?

obviously... I hoping to be out of the rat race soon...

talk to you later.

GuitarZan




msg:546226
 2:57 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hey,

tsinoy, although I am not making much of an income from this YET, I do have one bit of advice that I think is important:

1.) Pick a method/whatever and stick to it. You will inevitably find your own way... but don't hop from one thing to another.

2.) Just do it :-] Research is important, but don't get stuck in paralysis by analysis mode.

So thats 2 things, but they are very important.

Personally, I have started by building small Mini Sites, and promoting them through the PPC SE's. I read about creating sites like this from an ebook I purchased, but I have already started doing my own thing with the info, hence doing things on my own path.

All the Best,

C.K.

cagey1




msg:546227
 4:19 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

My problem is, just when I get to a level where I can retire and live comfortably off my "automatic" income, something drastic happens (like a Google algo change or 9/11 or my best customer goes belly-up) and I have to start all over again. This has been happening like clockwork every six months for the last four years.

(in all fairness, the same thing happened in my 9-5 job as well)

Procyon




msg:546228
 8:43 am on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

GuitarZan,

I like that approach - I'm doing something similar at the moment. Sure, the traffic isn't free (hope to build that with time), but it's nice not being at the mercy of the SE's. If you able to turn a nice profit with PPC, when (and if) you get the free traffic, you're laughing. :)

mfishy




msg:546229
 12:16 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm not really getting this. If you are doing well in aff marketing or anything else and prefer to work among people, get an office somewhere busy. Problem solved.

Michael Anthony




msg:546230
 12:25 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

cagey1, you appear too have too many eggs in the one basket, the key to aff marketing is a diverse income stream, NOT dependence on one industry.

I personally run around 20 products/merchants as a minimum, as do most high earners. You need to start learning from your mistakes, rather than just regretting them and crying into your beer.

rfung




msg:546231
 4:39 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

mfishy:

im just concerned that someone doing AM full time from home just doesn't get much contact at all. Of course it depends on how social one is, and what you're looking for. I live in San Jose, CA and as far as I am concerned, everyone here has 3 full time jobs and no time for much else. I know the people in my office are workaholics and slavedrivers... :) I think an environment where there's people, but they're not necessarily out there to backstab you to get ahead would be nice :)

Michael Anthony




msg:546232
 6:17 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

rfung, just FYI, I now have an open invitation to join some guys at a small office whenever I need a desk as a result of a real world contact made through this very forum. As it happens, I'm more comfortable in my home and I'd rather stay there and communicate on the telephone. Face to face meetings have a habit of eating into one's time, whereas a telephone call can always be cut short whenever you're ready

If you use this resource to make some local contacts, you'll be astounded at how very small the world really is these days.

cagey1




msg:546233
 8:45 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

You need to start learning from your mistakes, rather than just regretting them and crying into your beer

Yes, poor me

:(
'
~

rfung




msg:546234
 9:14 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'll buy you a beer.

dbar




msg:546235
 9:58 pm on Sep 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

No alarm clocks, no one telling you what to do, more freedom, take vacation whenever you want, etc..

In many ways life is a lot less stressful, in some ways in some ways it is more stressful. I have 3 kids (under 5) and a wife at home, so the house can be very loud. It's wonderful, and it's stressful.

I don't have a large bank reserve built up yet, but I make a lot more money then I used too when I was working for someone else. However, without the "cash reserve" yet I am constantly worried that someday it will all go away. To settle my anxieties I am trying to diversify, fully get out of debt, build the cash reserves, increase the investments, etc...

My goal is another 6-12 months to have many those anxieties under control.

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