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Highest Conversion rates
JoeyBall




msg:537400
 2:26 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hi,

The affiliate program that i am with has a selling ratio of 1 in 200.

Just wanted to know what the selling ratio for other webmasters are and if possible what sort of business they've in.

Just trying to get some ideas for the future really.

 

UpDown




msg:537401
 5:29 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Conversion of 1 in 200 is not good. The merchants that I work with vary from 1% to 10%. But conversion depends a lot on your audience and on how well you target the advertising, as well as on the merchant. Having said that I would hope you could do better than 0.5%.

fidibidabah




msg:537402
 6:55 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

I disagree.

It depends on what you're trying to do.

I have one affiliate that advertises 1:400, and is closer to 1:1000, but because of the type of widget service they are selling, and the payouts for me, it works very very well.

Yes, there are other merchants which you'd expect 1:100, 1:50, or even 1:5.. It all depends on whether it's worth it to you, and if there's anything better, and similar out there.

JoeyBall




msg:537403
 7:15 pm on Apr 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

What is it that both of you do?

would you share that information.

for me 1 sale is 2. Not very good. In the past it was about 1 in 30. Thats when i did really well but because of big companies the business has died that much. my site gets around 2000 hits a day around 4500 page hits.

I am really looking to perhaps do another affiliate program. Any help any pointers would be really helpful.

UpDown




msg:537404
 1:14 pm on Apr 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

I must admit that fidibidabah is right, it all depends what you are doing. We are all looking for return on investment, so we stick with what works best in our industry and advertising method.

My emphasis at the moment is on using Adwords. I test an ad by running it for a few hundred impressions to estimate the returns without spending too much money. Anything less than 1% CR would likely cost too much to test. I set myself a target ROI and just keep trying programs, products and ad variations until I find another combination that works. Then when something does well I expand in that area.

Catalyst




msg:537405
 4:54 pm on Apr 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

I agree it can vary greatly by merchant. Many of my affiliates say they need 1 sale out of 100 clicks and if they don't get a sale with a new merchant after 500 clicks they will drop them. I'm not saying I agree, just sharing that this seems to be what many suggest doing.

In reality higer priced items may be harder to sell and have lower conversions but the commission can be worth it. Lower priced items or lead based programs can have much higher conversion rates.

Linda

shrirch




msg:537406
 5:46 am on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

These days I tend to look more at the EPC (earnings per click) or earnings per thousand visitors I send out.

Look for programs that allow you to either generate thousands of clicks (volume) or have a high EPC (quality). You'll find that most programs will fall bang in the middle with little hope for improvement.

Cosmo




msg:537407
 10:31 am on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hello,

could some of the pros recommend some affiliate programs with huge conversion rates? Would be very nice.

greetings

cosmo

conroy




msg:537408
 1:57 pm on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

could some of the pros recommend some affiliate programs with huge conversion rates? Would be very nice.

You need to understand that none of us need anymore competitors. That kind of info is gold.

Cosmo




msg:537409
 2:01 pm on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

Ok. But can i trust the EPC rates in CJ?

UpDown




msg:537410
 4:33 pm on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'm sure you can 'trust' the CJ EPC figures, in that CJ are being honest. But whether you will get the same EPC is another matter. EPC can vary a lot between different types of affiliate site. For example an insurance comparison site might get a good EPC, whereas someone with insurance banners might see a much lower EPC.

In general I would first decide which products might interest your visitors, then try the affiliate programs with the highest reported EPC that offer that product. Don't just go for high EPC figures regardless of whether the offers are appropriate for your audience.

BetaChat




msg:537411
 7:58 pm on Apr 25, 2004 (gmt 0)

Lets say you have a company willing to pay you $40/sale and you advertised with Google Adwords. Now with that said, you advertised in AdWords at $0.05 per click, and in order to break even, you'd have to have one sale every 800/clicks. So when you say 1:200 is bad, you're talking about what you're selling. If I made 1:200, I'd be happy as could be. Because I'd be quadrupling my money. Just a thought, what do ya think? ;-)

And besides, my actual ratio is more around 1:600 at this point... So far it's not all it's cracked up to be..

Cosmo




msg:537412
 5:27 pm on Apr 26, 2004 (gmt 0)

im almost sure that there are almost none profitable keywords left for 0.05 $ to 0.20 $.

greetings

cosmo

fidibidabah




msg:537413
 4:13 am on Apr 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

Excellent point Cosmos.

I think the only real oppertunity, is the fact that so many people are SICK of PPC aff marketing, that if something new comes along, you could shark it ;)

BetaChat




msg:537414
 12:14 pm on Apr 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

I disagree about the fact that there isn't anymore keywords that are effective in the 0.05 - 0.20 range. I found several that are. And am now using them. I'm starting to understand how these other people are seeing this thing.

fidibidabah




msg:537415
 4:17 pm on Apr 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

lol, ok Beta. Have fun. When you're rolling in your millions please let me be the first one you sticky an "I told you so!" :)

BetaChat




msg:537416
 4:56 pm on Apr 27, 2004 (gmt 0)

Ha! Millions. Let me *profit* first. ;-)
Never said I'm makin' money, just kinda getting the concept. And the name is Rick. I have a loooooong way to go.

shorebreak




msg:537417
 7:48 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

Only half of all search results have any ads on them at all, so to say there are no $0.05-$0.20 words left is nonsense; you just have to dig a bit.

As for conversion rates, I'll throw out there that the global average conversion rate for ecommerce (total paid search engine clickthroughs divided by total estimated ecommerce transactions) is about 1.2%

ThomasB




msg:537418
 8:43 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

Doing the same as in organic SEO works for AdWords as well. Don't bid 2 USD for "widgets", bid 0.05 USD for "blue fuzzy widgets" instead and you should see a higher conversion rate and cheaper advertising costs.

Cosmo




msg:537419
 9:12 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

are there any example studies of this strategy?

BetaChat




msg:537420
 9:26 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

<<
Doing the same as in organic SEO works for AdWords as well. Don't bid 2 USD for "widgets", bid 0.05 USD for "blue fuzzy widgets" instead and you should see a higher conversion rate and cheaper advertising costs.
>>

Yeah, but, and I am probably wrong on this. But I've used extremely targeted keywording, and I didn't receive one hit. In that case, you would have to up the KW bid. I have noticed that if you include as much of the pricing in the ad "$100 can of worms", and not "Buy cheap worms", and use loose keywording, your ad gets seen, but if someone sees the price, and it's too high, they may not click on it. But what do I know? That's just my opinion. ;-)

mykel79




msg:537421
 11:28 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

>but if someone sees the price, and it's too high, they may not click on it

Then again, why would you want a user for whom the price is too high to click in the first place? :)

BetaChat




msg:537422
 11:31 pm on Apr 28, 2004 (gmt 0)

Good point! Thanks for putting me in my place! ;-)

skibum




msg:537423
 6:39 am on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

There are plenty of profitable cheap keywords for Aff programs out there, ya just gotta dig....deep and think out of the box.....way outside, sometimes.

Success depends on targeting by keyword and creative. Obviously ya gotta find relevant keywords. The right creative can turn general keywords into gems by further qualifying the visitor before they click.

Taget by keyword (obviously) & target by creative. Use the creative to include discount offers to draw the click or use it to hold back the clicks by putting the price in the ad if you only want people who can spend big bucks on whatever the product or service is.

I've found conversion rates from PPC affiliate stuff range from low enough to be a money loser, anywhere up to 7-10% depending on how well the creative/keyword combo are woven together to both qualify (prevent)and/or draw the click.

Michael Anthony




msg:537424
 9:02 am on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

Yes, this is tricky. You have to find a balance so that your keywords are specific enough to be cheap in PPC bid terms, but not so obscure that nobody ever searches for them. For example, for a UK mortgage campaign...

"mortgage" brings me lots of expensive timewasters
"UK remortgage" brings me cheaper, qualified, traffic
"UK low rate remortgages" brings me nothing!

(For those U.S. based readers, I believe that u spell mortgages slightly differently, the above is the UK spelling and not a deliberate typo)

eWhisper




msg:537425
 11:56 am on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

(For those U.S. based readers, I believe that u spell mortgages slightly differently, the above is the UK spelling and not a deliberate typo)

I love these examples. This is another example of targeting to your market and crossing between US & UK markets.

Being a US based person, and only speaking American english, I pay close attention to how a few WW members from Australia and UK spell certain words.

How many US people are targeting the UK with what UK people see as improper spelling? When I see a misspelling in an ad, I immediately dismiss it. Then I think, hmm, that ad was approved, did G miss that one, or is it me missing a new way of spelling something, which makes me look closer to see if there is a spelling difference between countries that I should be aware of.

Knowing international spellings & colloquialisms help to find new KW phrases.

There are plenty of cheap phrases left that do get traffic, its just a matter of the work involved finding them.

BetaChat




msg:537426
 12:03 pm on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

<<
"mortgage" brings me lots of expensive timewasters
"UK remortgage" brings me cheaper, qualified, traffic
"UK low rate remortgages" brings me nothing!
>>

One thing I noticed is that I use the "mortgage" example alot, but I place the price of the product in the ad header. So far my CTR has been way down, but at least I'm not wasting money on users who are click happy.

Michael Anthony




msg:537427
 12:04 pm on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

Too true, eWhisper, it's also often the case that mispellings can bring you much cheaper traffic. I recently came across a loans site that had been optimised for the mispelling - "Laons" - and just thought "I wish I'd thought of that".

mfishy




msg:537428
 12:48 pm on Apr 29, 2004 (gmt 0)

only thing with misspellings is the engines always throw up "did you mean?"...

eWhisper




msg:537429
 2:21 pm on Apr 30, 2004 (gmt 0)

Actually, I didn't mean targeting misspellings. While that is useful, I meant targeting country specific spellings.

There are some words that are spelled one way in the UK, and another in the US. If your a US company targeting a UK audience, are you using the UK spelling, or are you using the US spelling?

If you are using the US spelling, the UK people will think you are misspelling the term and are less likely to think of you as an authority, as you can't spell, not realizing thats the way its spelled in another country.

There are a many words that have spelling differences between the US and UK, and marketing the word correctly to the target audience can help your sales.

This 31 message thread spans 2 pages: 31 ( [1] 2 > >
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