homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.163.139.36
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member

Home / Forums Index / Search Engines / Directories
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: Webwork & skibum

Directories Forum

    
Dmoz dosen't list my site!
It's Been a Year Now and I'm Tired of Waiting
Roshu

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 9:15 am on Mar 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

I submitted my site to dmoz in the relevant category, yet I haven't been listed. It is about to be year now and I am tired of waiting. Is there any way to change the category to which I have submitted? What is the best method to submit and get listed in dmoz?

Roshu

 

neo_brown

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 3:26 pm on Mar 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

Dmoz dosen't list my site!

Welcome to the club. Its a big club with many, many unhappy members.
On the plus side there are a few editors that visit here and in my experience some have been very helpful.
Hopefully they will be able to give you some advice on how long to leave it etc, though having said that its no doubt been covered before.
Tried to search the forums?

BaseVinyl

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 3:31 pm on Mar 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

One site I submitted took 27 months to finally get listed. The funny thing is...one other site I had running got listed without me even asking for it to be listed...but they put it in the "Humour" section which is odd because it wasn't a funny site!

So to summarize the two DMOZ processess I had:

1) Submit site...wait 27 months...finally listed.
2) Don't submit site...get listed in wrong category within 6 months.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 4:23 pm on Mar 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

From the outside, the process will look random. (Hey, from the inside, it can look pretty random!)

Sites aren't prioritized in any way, except that an editor has to pick a site to review first. There is certainly no global priority (and there can't be, the web is just too complex for any global priority to make sense.)

In fact, there isn't even a global list of suggested sites: an editor is working on a category, and can see the sites suggested to that category. And different categories have different editing cycles -- most of them, of course, being highly irregular.

So you can't estimate the delay on one site by the delay on some other, different site (or really, even another similar site.)

cbpayne

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 7:39 pm on Mar 20, 2006 (gmt 0)

DMOZ dosen't list half the sites that are suggested. Its not a listing service.

RichTC

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 11:54 pm on Mar 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

Roshu,

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear

Read the other threads on what a waste of time dmoz is. Every webmaster knows that the way to get your site listed is to become an editor yourself, list your site in as many sectors as possible then dont bother with it - thats what most dmoz editors have done in the past!. If you want to keep your editor status active you just need to log in every now and again. Thats why the directory is full of out of date sites whilst millions of other sites dont get listed!

Dont forget that as an editor you can also ignore requests from other webmasters which is a great way to stop anyone that competes with you from being listed whilst securing yourself loads of free backlinks from dmoz and all the clone directory sites on the net at the same time.

Otherwise, dont bother with it - you wont get a visitor from it anyway but the free backlinks are always usefull so if you fancy editing yourself - go for it!

Good luck

Rich
P.S - You will read a few positive posts from some of the dmoz editors here like Hutchey for example - i still have absolutely no idea why she bothers with dmoz and i am very sure that someone of her obvious talent could put her skills to far better use in a commercial capacity than wasting her time on trying to plug the holes of the dmoz titanic.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 12:01 am on Mar 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

Idiosyncracy: it's not just a personal decision.

podman

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 5:10 am on Mar 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

RichTC - sorry you had a such bad day today - too bad in your haste you posted incorrect info.

Let's just take one item - no editor can block sites being listed - since every category has several hundred editors who can review sites.

The rest of what you post is equally invalid. Stick to posting something you actually have some knowledge about.

Rosalind

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:11 pm on Mar 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

Is there any way to change the category to which I have submitted?

Best not to, because if you resubmit you just take your site to the back of the queue.

What is the best method to submit and get listed in dmoz?

Read the submission guidelines carefully. Then read them again. I run a directory, and the majority of submitters obviously haven't bothered to read or understand them. Make the editor's job easy by writing a good, accurate description and your site will stand out head and shoulders above the others waiting for review.

ska_demon

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 11:22 am on Mar 23, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have submitted 3 sites to DMOZ in my time and all were listed within a month.

Why?

Maybe I'm lucky, OR

Maybe I chose the right category, not one with huge PR but a RELEVANT one.
Maybe my description was suitable and not over optimised or obviously a sales pitch.
Maybe I followed all the guidelines.
Maybe my site was not over optimised or using techniques that could be considered Black Hat.

I'm not saying that this is not the case for all of you but it seems odd that every site I have submitted has been listed within a month. So many people have bad things to say about crooked editors and such but maybe some of you should look at the type of site you are submitting and the technology behind it. Obviously an affiliate datafeed is not going to cut it and neither are link directories, MFA sites and so on.

I believe that if your site is suitable, well presented and conforms to the webmaster guidelines it will be listed in time.

Just my 2 cents, don't take it personally

Ska ;p

GlynMusica

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 11:57 am on Mar 23, 2006 (gmt 0)

It probably has something to do with the fact that there aren't as many editors as there used to be.

Scroll through the directory and you'll find VOLUNTEER to be editor of this category on many pages.

Of course when Google started devalueing the importance of DMOZ those dedicated editors we kept on hearing about in the forums decided to stay on regardless?

methinksNot.

Rosalind

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 12:42 pm on Mar 23, 2006 (gmt 0)

It probably has something to do with the fact that there aren't as many editors as there used to be.

I applied to be an editor of some obscure category over a year ago. After carefully crafting my entry, it was chewed up by the buggy system and never got through. Tried again, but that day it just wasn't going to work.

Now, perhaps the fact that I didn't persist with my applications suggests that I wasn't editor material anyway. But how many potential editors have been put off by technical problems?

victor

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:10 pm on Mar 23, 2006 (gmt 0)

Of course when Google started devalueing the importance of DMOZ those dedicated editors we kept on hearing about in the forums decided to stay on regardless?

Yoy don't need to ask that as a rhetorical question. You can find out and let us know.

Simply download (or otherwise acquire) some RDF RDFs for (say) the 18 months before and after when Google moved the ODP link off their home page and do some analyses.

I'd be interested in the results of your research.

Thanks in advance.

cbpayne

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 8:14 pm on Mar 23, 2006 (gmt 0)


It probably has something to do with the fact that there aren't as many editors as there used to be.

Scroll through the directory and you'll find VOLUNTEER to be editor of this category on many pages.

Where are you getting your information from? Its always been like that.

FYI - NO category is without an editor.

Wlauzon

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 4:56 pm on Mar 26, 2006 (gmt 0)

Maybe I chose the right category, not one with huge PR but a RELEVANT one.
Maybe my description was suitable and not over optimised or obviously a sales pitch.
Maybe I followed all the guidelines.

Or maybe you happened to luck into a rare category that has a real live editor.

There are hundreds of categories where it can take years to get into, no matter how well you follow your self-congratulatory rules.

lgn1

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 4:49 pm on Mar 27, 2006 (gmt 0)

Dont forget that as an editor you can also ignore requests from other webmasters which is a great way to stop anyone that competes with you from being listed whilst securing yourself loads of free backlinks from dmoz and all the clone directory sites on the net at the same time.

And this will eventually get you banned as an editor. If you suspect somebody is doing this, report them and provide proof.

Most of the problems with DMOZ, is that it is overloaded with requests, and they have two few editors.

You can help DMOZ out, by becomming an editor.

If you are persistant, you will eventually get in (unless you are a total klutz at writing good copy)

Remember, the squeeky wheel eventually gets the greese.

idolw

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 9:06 pm on Apr 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

You can help DMOZ out, by becomming an editor.

you cannot. i applied to the niche i work at. the reviewer did not even bother to specify the reason.

come on! if DMOZ editiorship is volunteer, at least a few words to someone trying to join are a duty!

podman

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 11:20 pm on Apr 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

Reasons for non-acceptance are always provided.

Tapolyai

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 11:47 pm on Apr 5, 2006 (gmt 0)

podman, you are funny. :)

victor

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 2:23 am on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

You must be easily amused Tapolyai.

The letter declining an editor application always, as podman says, carries a list of reasons why the applcation was not successful.

You may be chuckling over a completely different situation: that where 1000 or more spam suggestions of URLs are rejected each day and the spammer is not sent a reason why.

I find it amusing that the ODP does not tell spammers why their suggested URLs have been rejected while, in the real world, we all always email back to link spammers, or politely write notes explaining why we are not at present in the market for v1agra.

It's a funny old world when the politest thing to do is ignore someone. Makes us all snobs, yes?

Wlauzon

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 12:41 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

The letter declining an editor application always, as podman says, carries a list of reasons why the applcation was not successful.

Yes,and that is the problem. I sends out the same generic list to anyone and everyone. And with a list of generic reasons - some of them pretty broad - it is pretty useless information.

beren

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:00 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Most of the problems with DMOZ, is that it is overloaded with requests, and they have two few editors.

You can help DMOZ out, by becomming an editor.

A couple grammatical mistakes right there ;)

Seriously, I think it is true that DMOZ doesn't have enough editors, and they could be a substantially better directory with more manpower. And on discussion boards like this I used to accept that as an excuse from their defenders.

Then I speculated that they accept 90% of applications (they are a volunteer organization, right?) and was corrected by insiders who said they accept less than 30% of applications. The low acceptance rate for new editors is another example of the strange culture the organization has developed. I bet Habitat for Humanity, another volunteer organization that requires skilled labor, accepts over 90% of their volunteers. Volunteer ventures have to make the best with what they have.

The defenders typically respond to this type of comment with something like: "You don't understand our objectives. We would rather be small and good than big and mediocre." But this comes off sounding like the kid who didn't make the football team who says he's too good for football anyway, and much smarter and more accomplished than those dumb jocks.

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:28 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

> The ODP has too few editors!

Too few for what?

People that are interested in building categories apply for them and build them.

So if there is no editor for a category, then it is either because there is no one on the entire planet that finds it interesting enough to edit that category, OR that none of the applicants have demonstrated that their goals for editing are in alignment with the goals of the ODP (however, a few categories are open only to existing editors to apply for, not for new users, as experience is needed to spot spam).

> Too few for processing the submitted sites!

The ODP is not a site submission processing organisation. It is a group of volunteers who are building categories using any means to find useful and intersting sites.

podman

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 2:14 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Agree that the refusal is in general terms. That's because editors are supposed to be somewhat self-directing, and there is not a great deal of hand holding. Therefore, figuring out which of the reasons apply is part of the test.

If you think that's bad, once you become an editor and apply for a second category and get refused, you probably won't even get a list, just a refusal. But that's part of the learning experience, and it makes for better editors. You go back and self-review your work and realize how bad your editing really was, fix up the mistakea and apply again and get accepted.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 2:41 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Actually, I work for a real non-profit organization, and we'd be ecstatic if 30% of the people who offered to help us were minimally competent to do so. Most of the people who want to help, though their heart is in the right place, actually take up hours of our competent volunteers' time trying to show them what to do, they never accomplish much, sometimes they actually make mistakes that take us a long time to fix and then 90% of them drift off after a few days anyway, sending all of the time we spent training them down the drain. Most of the people who offer to volunteer are actually a net loss in terms of accomplishing our objectives.

It just depends on what the purpose of the organization is. For a suicide prevention hotline or a volunteer EMT, regardless of how much they need help, someone making mistakes could cost lives and I bet they accept far less than 30% of people who might like to help. For ODP, a mistake is obviously less crucial, but honestly, I bet half of the applications that get sent in have spelling, capitalization and grammar errors like the ones in idolw's post, and *I* wouldn't sign on somebody who made writing errors in the application to do writing work. Would you?

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 3:00 pm on Apr 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Every volunteer organization has its own way of weeding out non-volunteers. With Habitat for Humanity, it's the amount of HARD non-skilled labor they can offer to non-skilled laborers. The ODP doesn't have hewers of wood or drawers of water. It's all intellectual work (low-grade, certainly, compared to rocket science or even Harlequin romances--but unless you're one of those "the public schools are failing" agitators, you'd probably be shocked at how many applicants can't handle even that grade.)

A more relevant comparision: in another collaborative project I contribute to, less than 15% of the people who register ("volunteer") actually do more than one "participatory action". Since the ODP registration requires two or three actions up front, the percentage cited is well within reasonable expectations.

tavikki

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:07 pm on Apr 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

It is the editors that picks out the sites, and it is important to know that dmoz aint really a place to submitt your site, but it is for editors to find good sites to list. Therefor you can have a good site but the editor do not like the site and woulnt list it. Another problem is also that they are in the lack of editors. I was approved as a editor and in my category there was over 2 years old sites awaithing approval. The reason for this wes because there was no editor to edit that category.

<snip>

[edited by: engine at 1:57 pm (utc) on April 16, 2006]
[edit reason] No Self Promo. See TOS [webmasterworld.com] [/edit]

Birdman

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2684 posted 1:17 pm on Apr 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

Well, as much as I hate to comment on this subject, I will ;)

It's been at least four years and the site I submitted is very popular in it's category. Unfortunately, it just can't seem to get in the list with the other AOL hometown sites :(

My advice: Submit and forget!

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Search Engines / Directories
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved