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DMOZ - How to Get Listed?
Dmoz.org listing
Steelbank

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 6:28 pm on Feb 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

Has anyone had success in getting their sites listed with any consistency in DMOZ?

I have recently noticed that some webmasters can almost immediately get their sites listed...

help, anyone...

 

Genie

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 7:22 pm on Feb 6, 2006 (gmt 0)

A great deal depends on the category. Some have keen editors and limited submissions, so no submission waits for more than a couple of days. Other categories are deluged in submissions and attract few editors, so any submission could wait years.

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:24 pm on Feb 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

There is no consistency that could be measured in any way from any viewpoint.

The output of the directory is the random editings of 8000 random editors, in random categories, at random times, with random goals and purposes.

Submit once. Then forget about it.

rfontaine

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:28 pm on Feb 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

Dmoz is, at least partially, corrupted. A number of DMOZ editors list their own sites, those of business partners, friends and family, and try to keep competitors sites off of DMOZ.

So do not be surprised that you cannot get listed. You may or may not, even if you have an excellent site in your field.

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:35 pm on Feb 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are 200 editors that can, AND DO, edit anywhere, so it is impossible for one editor to stop any particular site from being listed.

ODP editors are allowed to list any site that is Guidelines compliant, but to show bias towards their own will get them booted.

There are people who want to just list their own site and do no other work. Many have been shown the door over the years.

[edited by: g1smd at 11:38 pm (utc) on Feb. 11, 2006]

cbpayne

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:36 pm on Feb 11, 2006 (gmt 0)


Dmoz is, at least partially, corrupted. A number of DMOZ editors list their own sites, those of business partners, friends and family, and try to keep competitors sites off of DMOZ.
An your evidence for this is? What was the response when you filed an abuse report?
Steelbank

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 4:03 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

I certainly am inclined to belive that DMOZ is partially corrupted.

One particular company that provides services as well as web development and has over 400 web clients has every website listed in DMOZ within 3 weeks. I know this because we hired them to develop 3 sites for us.

When we stopped using them and hired our own web team, we noticed the near impossibility of getting listed in DMOZ in the same categories.

How else can we exlain that?

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 4:33 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you already have three sites listed, and you then submitted some more sites that were related to those that were already listed , then it is likely that those new sites were not eligible for listing at all. No bias. No corruption. Them's the editing rules.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 8:32 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

Yes, that's very much the way we hope for the ODP to work, optimally: the first link to a site (or group of related sites) should be relatively easy to get (and relatively quick in this case), and each link thereafter should be increasingly more difficult. Almost any website with genuinely unique content makes our criteria for a single listing, but it needs to meet higher standards to get additional listings (having a brick-and-mortar location in a specific locality is probably the easiest such standard to meet, but there are a few others.)

So if you're suddenly having trouble getting ODP links after the first three, that's probably indicative of everything working the way it should be! It's only extraordinarily content-rich sites that are considered worthy of more than three different ODP links.

[ETA: Oh, and extensively multilingual websites. Sites that offer complete, quality translations of their content into many different languages often have more than three listings, too.]

Steelbank

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 9:10 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

Flicker, thanks for your comments however this confirms my suspicions.

We service a particular professional industry where 1) each site is for an individual professional who practices in different areas of their profession
2) these professionals are from different states and cities
3) the content is unique from each site to the next.

Since we meet these requirements, makes me wonder how else one can get into the directory?

idolw

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 9:27 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

flicker,

we offer genuine service that almost no one else offers. often our offer is the widest on the market and it is steadily growing.
how come bloody DMOZ editor cannot add us and can add a couple of mirror sites belonging to a large player who is a competitor of ours?

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 10:01 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

Report the mirror sites using the Update URL link in the category (use the existing URL, and in the comments box put "This is a mirror of domain.com"), and then fill in an abuse report listing the URLs and categories involved. The category editor, and editors in all higher categories, and all senior editors will be able to see the update. A meta editor will be able to review the alleged abuse, and can review the logs and see what has been put where and by whom...

Steelbank

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:18 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

g1smd, that still doesn't solve how the average webmaster can get their sites listed...

Do you think reporting an entire category will work? for that category had 80% of the listed sites from one particular company...

g1smd

WebmasterWorld Senior Member g1smd us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 11:28 pm on Feb 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

You can't "get sites listed". There is no such process. There is no-one stood behind the letterbox waiting to catch the package and deal with it.

There are 8000 people who take an interst in building categories and pick the most likely looking sites, from wherever they happen to come across them (Google, newspapers, TV, billboards, or user suggestions).

Make a report. Send it in. Someone will look at it, the logs, and the editors (there will be many) that have edited the category.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 2:36 am on Feb 13, 2006 (gmt 0)

Without knowing what your site is, of course, it's impossible to answer a question like "Why hasn't my site been listed yet." Some people who ask that question turn out to be spammers, I'm sorry to say, or the webmasters of sites that don't have the unique content they claim. Others are the webmasters of legitimate websites that simply aren't the sort the ODP links to. (Affiliate sales sites, for example. Perfectly legitimate websites, but not websites that fit with the ODP's theme as a directory.) In most cases, though, it's simply that no one has gotten to it yet. In areas of the directory that draw a lot of spam, it can take editors a long time to sift through all the garbage to find a good submission, and many editors prefer to look for new sites to add in places other than the submissions queue. (Which is perfectly fine with us, as they may be able to find more good sites more quickly that way!)

If that's the situation you're in, the best way to increase your chances of getting a link from the ODP is the same as the best way to increase your chances of getting an unpaid link from any other information-based website... make your own site both visible and clearly content-rich. Every time you get a quality link from one information-sector website, you increase the odds of another one finding you. Build good links. Add valuable content that information-based websites will want to link to. Submit it to the ODP, and email other relevant websites requesting that they link to you, but don't spend too much time worrying about it if any given one of them doesn't get back to you right away. The more links you have, the more you will get.

I frequently find new sites to add to the ODP by following links from another site that I've just added or which I know to be a good authority. Sometimes I even find good new sites by following links backwards (i.e. using Yahoo backlinks to see who links to a good site--often I find other good sites this way.) Sometimes I notice a new site to add in an obscure news article or mentioned in a friend's blog. Other times I will interact with a business in real life, check to see if they have a website, and add it if it's not already added. Making your business visible in any or all of these ways can help your quest to get a link from the ODP and simultaneously, to get a link from any other directory or informational website that might have a genuine reason to want to link to you.

Just submitting a site to a free directory, and then waiting to see what happens, isn't the most complete or proactive of business promotion plans. (-:

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 3:09 am on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

---- Just submitting a site to a free directory, and then waiting to see what happens, isn't the most complete or proactive of business promotion plans ---

Flicker, You are absolutely right about that...

I've submitted my site to DMOZ a long time ago (I think 1 1/2 years, give or take), to the correct subdirectory... spent time doing so. At the time I expected that if I really do a good job presenting the website to USERS (Potential CUSTOMERS), there should me no problems to get listed. It was truly a site that contained one of the best images of widgets in our niche (which gave us a head start in the market). Some time later, I asked on DMOZ forum whether the site was denied(and reason if any) a listing and got a reply to wait and ask in 6 month later. It’s been about 7-8 month since then. Since the Time I submitted to the directory, the editor position for the directory portion where I submitted was open to application to gain the spot: "BECOME AN EDITOR!" twice. Never took a shot at it, all though I know a whole bunch about the niche, as a webmaster, secrets of the trade and history of widgets we have. I have even wrote to DMOZ when domains that expired and been replaced with spam content were linked to from the DMOZ. And still, can’t get listed.

Well, I have a question to webmasters that do have DMOZ listing(link):

Besides annoying link request from SEO Companies that offer $1500 a month SEO Fee to rank “Even Higher”, scrapers and spam-bot visits, and cloned DMOZ link directories with links to your site that worth nothing(or even better, when they modify the content and link to you with 302 or META refresh), what is the value in having your site listed in DMOZ? Do you get people finding you site there and converting to a customer?
And no I am not taking into consideration if you have a website that displays “Ads by G” and have a link on Google Directory as well.

It’s a free link, maybe it’s a free link but…..

My friend submitted the site for the company he worked for, got listed in two days; that was 7 month ago, not my niche.

3 weeks later he had over 400 link backs in MSN, and no links were not added by webmasters, but simply an API Call. Since then about 350 domains/clones died out, so amount of backlins drooped by 350. Can you control that? What can you control?

WEEK AGO, we analyzed his web logs for the past 6 month, to see what was good about it, traffic wise: 13 hits for 6 month from DMOZ for the users that actually spent more than a 1 minute and 2 people became customers. Compare that to over 11,000 people that made a purchase coming from other sources.

I am not saying that Directory it self is worthless, its just for the new webmasters as well as webmasters of new sites this path is very risky these days and some times a waist of time.

We all talk about “Human Edited”, but what is it worth? For you and the “Editor”…

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 3:41 am on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>... I expected that if I really do a good job presenting the website to USERS (Potential CUSTOMERS), there should me no problems to get listed.

Ah, a source of confusion. That criterion is not really relevant at all. A tiny, clumsily-edited site is often an easy addition to a category; a slick, mega-paged site may not be listable at all.

>Since the Time I submitted to the directory, the editor position for the directory portion where I submitted was open to application to gain the spot: "BECOME AN EDITOR!" twice.

More confusion. Hardly any categories are closed to new applicants (although some may only be open to people with the requisite editing experience). And there is NEVER a "spot" to be filled or left empty, there is NEVER a "THE editor position". There are no editor positions, for that matter. There are classes of privileges that volunteers have been entrusted with, and those classes are not exclusive.

>I have even wrote to DMOZ when domains that expired and been replaced with spam content were linked to from the DMOZ.

This is appreciated--appreciated more than any other action you can take without becoming an editor.

>...what is the value in having your site listed in DMOZ? Do you get people finding you site there and converting to a customer?

>And no I am not taking into consideration if you have a website that displays “Ads by G” and have a link on Google Directory as well.

Well, technically the listings at the licensees ARE the only benefit the ODP offers webmasters. dmoz.org itself is the ODP workshop, not the catalog showroom.

But it's true that the benefits for webmasters are (from the ODP perspective) really accidental and inconsequential.

>My friend submitted the site ... got listed ... 3 weeks later he had over 400 link backs in MSN, and no links were not added by webmasters, but simply an API Call. Since then about 350 domains/clones died out, so amount of backlins drooped by 350. Can you control that? What can you control?

No, you can't control either MSN or the ODP clones. The ODP itself can't ("and doesn't want to") control its clones.

>I am not saying that Directory it self is worthless, its just for the new webmasters as well as webmasters of new sites this path is very risky these days and some times a waist of time.

>We all talk about “Human Edited”, but what is it worth? For you and the “Editor”…

No argument here. if you're counting kroner, pinching pesos, and measuring with marks, the ODP doesn't pay either editors or webmasters very well. There are just things some people do for other motives than money.

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 5:41 am on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

--other motives than money--

hmmmm, what would that be , a little dragon picture that is displayed next to the cool forum name?

hutcheson, you are defending something that was not attacked, well at least it looks like general response of DMOZ Editor…

Stop ….

I posted facts, its simply states my observations and thoughts on the directory listing outcome and and/or not outcome.

I do not need a listing in DMOZ, simply do to the fact I stated above. Plus the fact that someone responded to my question with an outranged obsession of being on a power trip of some sort, when I asked it.

--not the catalog showroom—

I dig the idea totally.

My points were and are :) --- just watch what you wish for. There are many new threads on starting a new e-commerce business, for the folks that discover it to as a part of things a must to have, it could simply be a depth wish, as nor do You or I or WE control the algorithm, outside of directories and our own sites when it come to the content to be displayed.

The Editor of the Subdirectory where I submitted my site to, is a webmaster that has no access to my site due to IP Block Restriction due to scraper-bot activity from his IP Block. I don’t have a listing in DMOZ, but 99% of sites that are listed in where I submitted to could only wish where I am.

Relationships, business models/Hobbies with people do not start from: I am an authority, cause my avatar says I am, they start from reviewing “what’s in it for me”. If we go fishing, and I catch the best beast, you will have to clean it, to have a piece.

You learn something from me, I learn something from you, we learn something from us. That is why I read this forum and not DMOZ One.

blend27

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 5:49 am on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

and finaly..

yes we do outrank all of our competitors ON MSN, Yahoo, an Google.

added: WHITE-HAT By Heart

Wlauzon

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 7:59 am on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think that general directories are pretty much following the Dodo in to oblivion. And that includes DMOZ.

To some extent DMOZ is a victim of itself - so many spam and scraper sites leach from it that it almost seems that it's main purpose in life now is to provide free content for money-making ad and link sites.

I think that if directories at all will have a future, they will have to be specialized. And they will probably also have to charge a fee, even if it is just a small one, to keep the number of junk sites down.

And while the "volunteer" editor mode might seem noble, in practice it has not worked out all that well. You end up with about 10 that really do much, and 3000 that add their own sites and then move on - sometimes after altering the competitions listings to sound less favorable.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 2:03 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>what is the value in having your site listed in DMOZ

Not very much, in my opinion. I like the directory a lot, which is why I spend time editing it, but it's primarily valuable to its USERS, not to the people being linked to. The people being linked to primarily just get the satisfaction of knowing that their site has (essentially) earned a little Internet award. Depending on the category and topic, it may see a small amount of traffic from the ODP and the Google Directory, which is probably pretty well focused traffic. That's about it.

That's why editors are always yapping about how the directory isn't for webmasters, it's for users. Because it's really true. The boost it gives a site to be listed in the ODP is miniscule at best. It really wouldn't make any sense for us to go into any contortions to help webmasters "get" their sites listed faster because it doesn't really help them anyway.

We concentrate on helping our users, and if the good sites that we list get a little ego boost out of the fact that we say they're good sites, then great. If they get a little bit of good traffic out of it, then good for them. If they go up from #5 to #4 on a Google search, then that's nice. That's about the upper limit of anything that could possibly happen to a site we link to, in my opinion, so it's really not worth anyone worrying about more than any other nice link they could find somewhere.

You're 100% right, websites can do well without ODP listings, and other websites that do have ODP listings go out of business all the time (I should know, I have to delete their listings.) I think the myth that an ODP listing is any kind of be-all and end-all ought to be taken out and shot--all it does is encourage people to try and cheat our system, which annoys us and degrades our directory, but doesn't gain them much of anything at all even if they succeed at it. :P

SincerelySandy

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 3:54 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

it's primarily valuable to its USERS, not to the people being linked to

I hear this "value to it's users, not webmasters" argument frequently from editors. However,
most webmasters say that DMOZ does not send them much traffic, more like extremely little. The DMOZ does get a lot of traffic/users though. This leads me to conclude that most of DMOZs traffic is from webmasters and it's own editors.
If DMOZ actually provides "valuable" content to it's users, why doesn't it have more users (not webmasters), why doesn't it send websites more traffic?
DMOZ has been around a long time, long enough to build some sort of reputation as being a good place to find informtaion, but it has not. I'm sure there are a few (there always are), but I don't know any non-webmasters that have ever heard of or used DMOZ. Plenty of talk about craiglist, but never once has any non-webmaster ever mentioned DMOZ to me. Apparently "users" are not finding the DMOZ "valuable" or it would send more traffic. Apparently, it's mostly webmasters, editors, scrapers, and cloners that feel as though the DMOZ has some value. Maybe DMOZ should just accept what it has become.
Anyone who sees a flaw in my logic, please feel free to speak up.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 4:37 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

Well, there are more than 5 million links in the ODP. If the ODP saw, say, 20 million visitors a day who clicked on a link, that would average out to only four hits a day for each site listed in it.

Which would make it barely useful at all for any given webmaster of a site listed in there, but very useful indeed to the 20 million people visiting the site and finding the link they want.

There have only ever been 70,000 ODP editors in total, and I'm sure no more than half of them are currently editing today, so the idea that we alone could account for the high traffic levels of dmoz.org doesn't stike me as very likely.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 7:26 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>I hear this "value to it's users, not webmasters" argument frequently from editors....However,
most webmasters say that DMOZ does not send them much traffic, more like extremely little.

No basis for argument there.

>The DMOZ does get a lot of traffic/users though. This leads me to conclude that most of DMOZs traffic is from webmasters and it's own editors.

Agreed. You might even say that "dmoz.org is the workshop, not the catalog showroom."

If DMOZ actually provides "valuable" content to it's users, why doesn't it have more users (not webmasters), why doesn't it send websites more traffic?

You might almost say the users are visiting some showrooms instead.

>DMOZ has been around a long time, long enough to build some sort of reputation as being a good place to find informtaion, but it has not. I'm sure there are a few (there always are), but I don't know any non-webmasters that have ever heard of or used DMOZ. Plenty of talk about craiglist, but never once has any non-webmaster ever mentioned DMOZ to me.

I've had the opposite experience. Nobody has ever mentioned craigslist to me. Perhaps it's a cultural difference: I'm not into pushing-consuming circles, and the people (not just non-webmasters) that talk to me (about anything, not just the net) are more interested in information than advertising.

>Apparently "users" are not finding the DMOZ "valuable" or it would send more traffic.

Are you forgetting "dmoz.org is the workshop, not primarily intended for users at all?" And that has been the official response to editor proposals that dmoz.org be promoted more heavily as an end-user site.

>Maybe DMOZ should just accept what it has become.
Anyone who sees a flaw in my logic, please feel free to speak up.

I'm all for accepting reality. But where's your logic? You're claiming that nobody you know uses the ODP -- in other words, you are in fact immersed deep in a culture that (according to the editors) isn't being served by the ODP. Why not just accept that nobody in your line of business uses the ODP? After all, if they did (as you also claim) they wouldn't be helped much. It has nothing to do with you, and ... that's reality, that's OK, and that's even part of what makes the ODP unique and uniquely valuable.

Sure, the ODP is an artifact (or a vestige, if you will) of the information culture, not the marketroid culture. That has lots of effects. It's not into self-promotion (as staff as repeatedly told us, when editors suggested dmoz.org could be promoted better.) That's reality, and that's OK.

We have no control over how ODP data is used. That's reality, and that's OK. Over the years most of the search engines have experimented with various ways of using ODP data. (And over the years, hundreds of SERP perps have gnashed their teeth in fury and malice at what they imagine to be search engine use of the ODP. You might try telling THEM to just accept what the ODP has become -- but don't get within spitting range when you do!) But, so far as editors are concerned, however the SE's use the data is acceptable.

I'm all for accepting reality. Reality is, there are a few thousand volunteers doing something for some mission they share, and ... nobody really tracks who uses the result. Accept that, and there will be a common ground of discussion with the people who have deciding the current ODP mission is something worth spending time on.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 7:35 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>I hear this "value to it's users, not webmasters" argument frequently from editors....However,
most webmasters say that DMOZ does not send them much traffic, more like extremely little.

No basis for argument there.

>The DMOZ does get a lot of traffic/users though. This leads me to conclude that most of DMOZs traffic is from webmasters and it's own editors.

Agreed. You might even say that "dmoz.org is the workshop, not the catalog showroom."

If DMOZ actually provides "valuable" content to it's users, why doesn't it have more users (not webmasters), why doesn't it send websites more traffic?

You might almost say the users are visiting some showrooms instead.

>DMOZ has been around a long time, long enough to build some sort of reputation as being a good place to find informtaion, but it has not. I'm sure there are a few (there always are), but I don't know any non-webmasters that have ever heard of or used DMOZ. Plenty of talk about craiglist, but never once has any non-webmaster ever mentioned DMOZ to me.

I've had the opposite experience. Nobody has ever mentioned craigslist to me. Perhaps it's a cultural difference: I'm not into pushing-consuming circles, and the people (not just non-webmasters) that talk to me (about anything, not just the net) are more interested in information than advertising.

>Apparently "users" are not finding the DMOZ "valuable" or it would send more traffic.

Are you forgetting "dmoz.org is the workshop, not primarily intended for users at all?" And that has been the official response to editor proposals that dmoz.org be promoted more heavily as an end-user site.

>Maybe DMOZ should just accept what it has become.
Anyone who sees a flaw in my logic, please feel free to speak up.

I'm all for accepting reality. But where's your logic? You're claiming that nobody you know uses the ODP -- in other words, you are in fact immersed deep in a culture that (according to the editors) isn't being served by the ODP. Why not just accept that nobody in your line of business uses the ODP? After all, if they did (as you also claim) they wouldn't be helped much. It has nothing to do with you, and ... that's reality, that's OK, and that's even part of what makes the ODP unique and uniquely valuable.

Sure, the ODP is an artifact (or a vestige, if you will) of the information culture, not the marketroid culture. That has lots of effects. It's not into self-promotion (as staff as repeatedly told us, when editors suggested dmoz.org could be promoted better.) That's reality, and that's OK.

We have no control over how ODP data is used. That's reality, and that's OK. Over the years most of the search engines have experimented with various ways of using ODP data. (And over the years, hundreds of SERP perps have gnashed their teeth in fury and malice at what they imagine to be search engine use of the ODP. You might try telling THEM to just accept what the ODP has become -- but don't get within spitting range when you do!) But, so far as editors are concerned, however the SE's use the data is acceptable.

I'm all for accepting reality. Reality is, there are a few thousand volunteers doing something for some mission they share, and ... nobody really tracks who uses the result. Accept that, and there will be a common ground of discussion with the people who have deciding the current ODP mission is something worth spending time on.

SincerelySandy

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 4:29 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

Which would make it barely useful at all for any given webmaster of a site listed in there, but very useful indeed to the 20 million people visiting the site and finding the link they want.
A good point that I had not thought of from that angle.
so the idea that we alone could account for the high traffic levels of dmoz.org doesn't stike me as very likely.
No, not just editors, but all the webmasters visiting the site to submit a site or checking in every day to see if their site was added, and all the scrapers and cloners. And as for the "high traffic levels" I don't see that dmoz has "high traffic levels", there are plenty of other meta directories that get more traffic and have not had nearly as many years to get established. And if you take away all the webmaster/editor/cloner traffic then there really doesn't seem to be much traffic there and my website stats seem to agree.
You might almost say the users are visiting some showrooms instead. You might even say that "dmoz.org is the workshop, not the catalog showroom."
With respect, I got the gist of what you were trying to say here, but please feel free to be a little more direct and spell things out a little more clearly.
dmoz.org is the workshop, not primarily intended for users at all
Here's what the site says it's priorities are "We will be guided by the needs of our data users and the ODP editorial community" At least they state clearly that their editors needs are a priority. I guess this is why the ODP doesn't use "nofollow", it's editorial community needs those links and many editors would leave if it were implemented.
Why not just accept that nobody in your line of business uses the ODP? After all, if they did (as you also claim) they wouldn't be helped much.
I don't know anybody in my line of business, I've never even met another webmaster to my knowledge, except online. Everyone I know is a non-webmaster and none of them have ever mentioned the ODP. So it's not just "nobody in my line of business" it's just nobody, at least nobody I know.
Reality is, there are a few thousand volunteers doing something for some mission they share, and ... nobody really tracks who uses the result

You sure make it sound good.

While looking at the dmoz site, here's a quote I came across that I thought was a little funny...
The small paid editorial staffs at commercial directory sites can't keep up with submissions, and the quality and comprehensiveness of their directories has suffered. Link rot is setting in and they can't keep pace with the growth of the Internet.
Sounds exactly like what so many people have said about DMOZ.

I know I sound like I hate dmoz, but I think it's a good concept.

flicker

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 4:52 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I think Hutcheson is actually making a deeper point than this, but the ODP is primarily working to provide the data, which other sites then use. The dmoz.org user interface itself isn't really the greatest. Most people probably use the Google directory when they want to access our data, because the Google directory has better search functionality and only lags a little bit behind the ODP timewise.

Myself, I like to do a site:dmoz.org Google search for whatever it is I'm looking for. I can usually find whatever I'm looking for in exactly two clicks that way (one to the correct ODP category, and another one to the correct site.)

woop01

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 5:13 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

The mantra that Dmoz is for the users and not the sites listed is a bit ironic considering who actually uses the directory for what purpose.

We recently conducted 700 random interviews at various industry events for a new portal site. We found 3 people who listed Dmoz as a directory they use. It's just my opinion based on that and traffic from Dmoz vs other directories, but I think it's turned into something that has a much higher opinion of itself than it's actual standing in the internet.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 6:54 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

Perhaps part of the semantic disjoin in this discussion is that for editors, DMOZ ISN'T DEFINED BY WHO OR HOW MANY PEOPLE USE IT, whereas in the marketroid world, that's all that matters.

So ... if we don't know and can't control who uses it, then ... whatever judgment we have of it can't be based on that.

I don't know how many times I've said here: the ODP is not for everyone. It's not for the majority of people. It's not even for a large minority. (It's not even DIRECTLY for the majority of directory users!) For that matter, neither is the OED, or the LoC. And that's OK.

So if you want to measure your site by visitor count -- that's fine. That has nothing at all to do with what I work for, which is also fine. Just don't confuse the two goals.

hutcheson

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 2665 posted 10:42 pm on Feb 16, 2006 (gmt 0)

>... at various industry events

Um, "various" how?

Did they cater to corporate mouthpieces and product-pushers, or ... to librarians and researchers?

Try your experiment at various "academic" or "hobbiest" events, and you'd probably get a very different answer.

Which is fine -- "every pig to his own wallow."

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