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Writing Articles for Syndication
How Many Different Places To Submit To?
Jane_Doe




msg:410320
 12:32 am on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

When you write an article for distribution, how many different sites and/or directories do you usually submit it to?

If 5 - 10 sites have already posted one of your articles, do you keep on submitting it at more places or stop?

When you write the next article in a related group of topics, do you submit again to the places that published your articles previously, or focus more on getting links from different sites for the next round?

Are there any drawbacks to submitting articles to article directory sites?

These are all unique articles and are not duplicate content with any of the pages on my sites.

Any advice is appreciated.

 

roxyyo




msg:410321
 2:40 am on Mar 9, 2006 (gmt 0)

I usually submit to at least 20...but that's just me. I figure you never know which site a potential webmaster/ezine publisher is visiting. I keep a database of the top 80. If you PM me with your email address I can send it as an attachment (this is open to anyone who would like it :)

Jane_Doe




msg:410322
 2:18 am on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

Thanks for the feedback, roxyyo.

A related question ....

I just submited an article to a number of sites last week. If I do a Google search for a unique phrase within the article, 6 sites show up in Google. The first one shows the snippet along with the "we have omitted some entries very similar..." line. So Google is flagging all but one as duplicates, which seems logical.

So I'm just curious if anyone has any thoughts if the links from the similar articles count at all for rankings, or if only the first one really matters and the rest are discarded as duplicates?

Is there any harm in having the same article appear on a lot of different sites? I don't think so because I see a lot of high ranking sites having syndicated articles that sometimes appear on hundreds of sites, but I was just curious if anyone else had any thoughts on this.

Swebbie




msg:410323
 4:33 am on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

When you write an article for distribution, how many different sites and/or directories do you usually submit it to?

About 6 - but only the top ones. Don't waste time on the small ones, in my opinion. Takes maybe 30 minutes per article, but I usually can expect at least 25 and maybe as many as a few hundred links out of it. I have a newer site that has no reciprocal links at all, but I wrote 4 articles about it and one of them got picked up from a top directory and was used in one of the industry's biggest email newsletters. The exposure of that one article now has that site ranking #1 on a major search engine for 2 keywords that get a decent number of searches. All of that from a grand total of about 3 hours of work (2 to write the article and about 30 minutes to submit it).

If 5 - 10 sites have already posted one of your articles, do you keep on submitting it at more places or stop?

I stop. There's no real harm in continuing, but as long as you're hitting the top directories in the 5-10 you submit to, it comes down to using your time wisely. From my experience, the vast majority of these sites are just a waste of your time. Your time's better spent writing more and submitting to fewer sites that are the top dogs.

When you write the next article in a related group of topics, do you submit again to the places that published your articles previously, or focus more on getting links from different sites for the next round?

If you stick to the bigger, established directories, which get a ton of traffic daily and from a wide variety of sources, your exposure is huge compared to the little ones. You have no control over who will pick up your article to reprint it, so it makes more sense to go after the widest audience, even if it means some level of repeats. It's a good idea to find some sites on your own to submit your articles to, as well. Don't only submit to directories. Look for sites in your industry that are not direct competitors and ask if they'd like the article for content on their sites. Just require them to leave your link(s) in place. Those are some great one-way links!

Are there any drawbacks to submitting articles to article directory sites?

Can't do your site any harm, per se. You need a thick skin because some of those who you find using your articles will not give you credit or a link. Comes with the territory. It's not worth my time to pursue that or get into an email argument. I ignore it. The only drawback I can think of is that it does take up your time. But, since getting links is critical to ranking on the major search engines, it's a valid use of that time.

One other thing I try to keep in mind at all times with this subject. Don't just think of the search engine benefits. The more articles of genuinely high quality you write on your topic, the more credibility you build in your industry. You (and by extension, your site) will become known as an authority, and that can be like printing money. It takes time, but I've seen it pay off with at least one of my main sites in about 14 months. You'll notice that your site is getting traffic flowing in from non-search engine sources as the number of links grows. Keep plugging away with good articles and make sure that it isn't all wasted when people get to your site! Great content on your site is the ultimate means to your goal of making a living from it.

Jane_Doe




msg:410324
 8:14 am on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

Thanks for for taking the time to post such detailed replies, Swebbie.

sugarrae




msg:410325
 2:25 pm on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

When you write an article for distribution, how many different sites and/or directories do you usually submit it to?

Depends on the site i am submitting for and the ones I am submitting to. I have a basic list of directory sites to hit, bit IMHO, the most valuable places to submit to are ones that are real sites (not directories).

In that case, I contact as many as I can with an offer of writing an article (and include a link to a really good sample one) and ask if they'd be interested in me doing one for them. If they say yes, they get an article made just for them and no one else.

But, as mentioned, the top article directories also do get picked up by real sites at times. We have one site that anytime we do a new article on the topic, 2 or 3 real, "full fledge" sites (i.e. not scraper crap) run the article.

If 5 - 10 sites have already posted one of your articles, do you keep on submitting it at more places or stop?

Depends on if the articles are getting picked up by new outside sites each time. If so, then we keep submitting articles on the topic.

Also, when you get articles on sites that aren't directories, you can get a lot of targeted traffic - so in those cases, we'll keep writing them because each new one brings in traffic that is actually worth something (and in those cases, who cares about the engines?). ;-)

When you write the next article in a related group of topics, do you submit again to the places that published your articles previously, or focus more on getting links from different sites for the next round?

For me, I think I covered that in the answer above.

Are there any drawbacks to submitting articles to article directory sites?

Just that you shouldn't be building your entire linking strategy around using article directories. Articles have become mainstream - and as with everything that becomes mainstream, it will lose effect in "crap" forms. AKA if you're site is ranking because you submit 10 articles per week to the same list of 25 directories and the only sites who ever pick up those articles are scrapers - well, if/when that day (losing effect) comes, you'll wish you had put your eggs in more baskets.

If you're submitting articles to non-directories, submitting to directories with traffic and being sure not to let it be your *only* form of link development or even close to it, I can't see any downside.

Just my two cents... ;-)

ownerrim




msg:410326
 2:36 pm on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

I could be wrong, but of the list of 600 articles site that I reviewed, only about a dozen (or less) seemed to be top notch. Perhaps that doesn't matter if "a link is a link is a link". But, somehow, I just don't feel comfortable submitting articles to every beater articles site. I file my discomfort with that under "trust issues".

Jane_Doe




msg:410327
 4:20 pm on Mar 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

Just my two cents... ;-)

Thanks suggarrae. I'm sure your advice is worth a lot more than two cents. :)

But, somehow, I just don't feel comfortable submitting articles to every beater articles site.

I guess my instincts tell me the same thing, too, which is why I posed the question. I think too many directory submissions of any kind may not be so wise. I'm just kind of a numbers game type of person, so sometimes it is hard to resist.

graywolf




msg:410328
 3:26 am on Mar 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you wanted to be clever you could find all of the sites your competition has articles on, screen for quality, and try to directly submit a unique article to each of them.

Jane_Doe




msg:410329
 11:14 pm on Mar 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

If you wanted to be clever you could find all of the sites your competition has articles on, screen for quality, and try to directly submit a unique article to each of them.

Good tip, Graywolf. I've also been following a lot of the other advice you have on your blog, too. I always find lots of helpful advice there, especially about links. :)

Swebbie




msg:410330
 3:09 am on Mar 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

I sent out just five emails to related sites this past week asking the owners if they'd like to have an article I wrote that their readers would find useful. I did not demand a return link as 'payment,' but I did ask nicely. Two of the five printed the article and both gave my site a link back. I just checked my stats for that site, and in just 5 days there have been almost 200 visitors coming through those links. This is the way to go! Give webmasters in related fields free content (make sure it's high quality stuff), ask politely for a link back in return, and you might be pleasantly surprised.

wildegray




msg:410331
 6:50 am on Mar 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

Jane (and everyone else) I would agree with everything said so far, but want to add to the concept of continual submissions. If they are picked up (and the site picking them up is of quality) I would definitely work at developing a mature relationship with them - after all, it couldn't hurt, and communication is what our business is all about, right?

And for those that don't pick your articles up:
I view this as a freelance journalist (that's what I used to do, and will continue in the future, once I get this world thoroughly digested):
If you want to post with them, or be "published" by them, persistence is key. Maybe there were topical factors in their selections for that round, or who knows what (this all depends on who you're submitting to).

On the trust issue, I agree on the specific instance (article farms), but not as a rule. Emerson said it best:

"Trust men, and they will be true to you; treat them greatly, and they will show themselves great, though they make an exception in your favor to all their rules of trade."

By the way, Swebbie, you got a link to that article you were talking about?

arikgub




msg:410332
 6:30 pm on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

Swebbie,

I sent out just five emails to related sites this past week asking the owners if they'd like to have an article I wrote that their readers would find useful.

Do you attach an article to the first e-mail you send to the sites? Or do you just ask them whether they would like to receivea an article from you, and send the article after you get a positive reply?

sugarrae




msg:410333
 6:32 pm on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

>>>Or do you just ask them whether they would like to receivea an article from you, and send the article after you get a positive reply?

That's usually my route.

Swebbie




msg:410334
 8:14 pm on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

Hi Arikgub,

I mix it up, but I have to tell you - I get much better results when I just go ahead and attach or paste the article in my approach email. Many here will warn against it because unscrupulous webmasters out there will just take your article and use it without providing you a link or any credit for it. My personal position on that is to consider it an acceptable risk. Last week's example is a good one. I have no idea if those 2 sites would have posted my article with links back to my site had I not included it in my approach email. But I got a 40% response rate (2 out of 5). That's more than twice what I normally get from doing it without including the article - just offering it. I think if the article is good enough, they read it and think it's a worthy addition to their own sites and then most feel compelled to give you a link back. The quality of the article is all-important.

Do I find articles of mine that have been posted without any credit to me or a link back? Yep. Is it many? Nope. I've got a thick skin about it. Those one-way links I do get from this are like gold. They are usually on a page with only internal links for that site, which I believe makes my link stand out more to both visitors and search engines. The key is approaching only related sites... don't shoot all over the map.

AuthorityDomains




msg:410335
 9:25 pm on Mar 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

We submit to a lot more than 20 or 30, and we get a great ROI on our time for those submissions. For example, the other day we submitted an article to about 200 article directory sites, and we got about 45 confirmed links.

It took less than 5 day to do the submissions, and 45 links for 5 days is not bad in my opinion.

Also, we select some directories that are specifically related to the site in question, as well as some general article directories.

Jane_Doe




msg:410336
 12:04 am on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

45 links for 5 days is not bad in my opinion

Don't you worry that would trip filters in Google and get a penalty?

AuthorityDomains




msg:410337
 5:14 am on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

No, so far haven't seen that at all, al our sites have stayed healthy, in fact the links gave them a boost.

fourchette




msg:410338
 6:40 am on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

hummm.

Ok this is a silly question,

But when publishing articles like that.. you don't keep a vopy on your website right? Those articles are only to be distributed on the web?

Thanks

arikgub




msg:410339
 7:25 am on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

But when publishing articles like that.. you don't keep a vopy on your website right? Those articles are only to be distributed on the web?

The same question bothers me too. I don't think you want to keep an exact copy on your site, because of the possible duplicate content penalty. On the other hand, if you have already invested a lot of time in the article and all the background research it's a pitty not to use it on your own site. It seems to me the best way to go is to have two versions of the same article with different wording, one for distribution, and one for yourself.

idolw




msg:410340
 8:19 am on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

45 links for 5 days is not bad in my opinion

45 quality links? or 45 links from scraper sites?

45 links from links pages in 5 days sounds bad to me. this is done within 60 minutes.

if these are quality reviewed links, then 45 links in 5 days is very cool.

Jane_Doe




msg:410341
 4:26 pm on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I have a feeling that to Google links from lots of article directories either is now, or could very easily become, the 2006 version of submitting your sites to hundreds of SEO owned general link directories.

So I think suggare's repeated advice to get a variety of different types of links and her advice in this thread to not submit to every beater article directory is probably a pretty wise course.

AuthorityDomains




msg:410342
 9:57 pm on Mar 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

Absolutely Jane_Doe, the key is variety, that's why my sites stay healthy, as this is only part of our link building campaigns. We do lots of other stuff, such as link baiting, press releases, content exchanges, text advertising, etc.

We use 2 versions of the article: 1 for our sites, which is posted before we submit, and another to submit.

So far we have ended up with a mixture of links, some high quality, some with lower PR. What's nice is that the links are all in the body, and because the links are within the article, they are contextual.

We haven't had any problems so far with building links too far, but I will keep this in mind and consider breaking up the submissions into groups.

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