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Promoting deep linking
is it good or not?
caspita




msg:410147
 7:10 pm on Jun 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Hi All,

For a new site that I just put on a month ago I'm starting to promote the linking, thinking in different strategies I had put some text into my 'Add a Link' page indicating that I'm open to discusse deep linking in a good manner. I haven't seen this approach too much in the different link pages that I have been visiting (filling up forms, etc), so I was wondering if this will be really a good aproach or not.

What do you think about deep linking strategies? are those good? or the complication is too much for the results..

Thanks,

CS.

 

bufferzone




msg:410148
 4:26 pm on Jun 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

I think it is a great idea. The problem is that deep linking spreads out the PR you receive form other sites, instead of concentrating it on your index page.

The reason I like the idea is, that it gives you the opportunity to have more then one page with a good PR (if you develop your deep linking strategy with care), giving you the chance to optimize for more keywords. Instead of having an index page with the PR of 6 and then all the rest of the pages lower, you might achieve a PR of 6 for more pages. In my view this might be more valuable then a PR of 7 for just the index page (depending on the competition on your chosen marked), but that just my thoughts, maybe others think differently

Abdelrhman Fahmy




msg:410149
 4:36 pm on Jun 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

As long as most of SEs ranking based on ranking every page separately, then linking to deep pages may be helpful for:
1- Ranking for sub-keywords (especially links with a relevant anchor text)
2-raising the rank of the deeper level pages (always the PR decreasing when spreading from the index to the second, third, fourth... level pages
3- Very useful when dealing with a dynamic pages (/?productid=xx)

buckworks




msg:410150
 4:50 pm on Jun 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

As long as your internal links are well-structured, the PR you gain from deep links will circulate and benefit your whole site.

If another site wants to deep link because it makes sense for their content, welcome that, because traffic from such links is often better targeted than average.

martinibuster




msg:410151
 4:53 pm on Jun 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Deep links are a good way of bringing second layer directories to the top. Concentrating all your links at the home page is shortchanging the ranking effectiveness of your deeper pages.

Think of links as PATHS for the spiders. If spiders only crawl two links away from the entrance, then deeper pages are not being adequately crawled.

The problem is that deep linking spreads out the PR you receive... instead of concentrating it on your index page.

bufferzone has a good idea. Home page PR is not as important as ranking well across all pages of your website. Home page PR is in many ways a waste of a link, in my opinion.

chrisnrae




msg:410152
 10:29 pm on Jun 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

I am in one specific industry where deep linking is pretty common and seems to be pretty effective as well.

neuron




msg:410153
 11:00 am on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

What do you think about deep linking strategies? are those good? or the complication is too much for the results..

the argument is similar and shares many issues with:

is it better to build multiple sites each selling a single product or a single site selling all the products?

and the answer is similar as well. when you build multiple sites you get links to multiple product home pages. for a single site selling multiple products then you should have incoming links to multiple internal pages for those same products in order to benefit from the same effect of having multiple sites.

Marcia




msg:410154
 11:32 am on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

Great topic! Any thoughts on the best way to request deep links?

bufferzone




msg:410155
 12:51 pm on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

If you have a content rich site, you can do a lot of the footwork yourself. Find sites with content that complements yours and then find the best pages for this site to (deep) link to. I find that if you make it easy for the other webmaster, if you serve the right arguments for him to link to you, more often then not you will get the link. Arguments like “this content on my site will really help your visitors. My content complements yours well” often will do the trick, and if you suggest linking directly to content your arguments often work stronger IMHO

defanjos




msg:410156
 2:52 pm on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

Great topic! Any thoughts on the best way to request deep links?

When requesting links, include a link to a page in which you have explained different ways to link to you. Include in this page many text links linking to different pages (different anchor text also), a couple of banners, etc. Make sure to include the HTML code in a form field, so they can simply copy it and paste it on their site.

This way, you'll get all kinds of varied links, and they look "natural".

pageoneresults




msg:410157
 3:06 pm on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

I'd prefer a deep link over a home page link. If a webmaster has linked to something on one of my sites, I hope they've provided a direct link to their visitors for the topic at hand. There is nothing more frustrating than clicking a link and being whisked away to a home page of another site when I should have been sent right to the page (deep link) that was specific to the topic.

Based on my practices of providing outbound links, rarely will I link directly to a home page of a site unless specifically requested. Even then, I have to take into consideration my visitors. I don't want to send my visitors somewhere and have them 2, 3 or 4 clicks away from where they should actually be.

I will typically try to request deep links to root level pages of sub-directories without the index.asp extension and with the trailing forward slash...

www.example.com/sub/

This allows me to focus on each category within the site. And yes, it is a great way to manage PageRank in Google's case.

Craig_F




msg:410158
 4:08 pm on Jun 20, 2004 (gmt 0)

another benefit I find with deep linking is that it hides many of my links from my less savvy competition. they seem to only look at home page backlinks when looking for links they can get as well, there they'll see 100 or so, but if they took the time to check out other pages of the site they'd find 1500+ more.

graywolf




msg:410159
 1:34 am on Jun 21, 2004 (gmt 0)

Great topic! Any thoughts on the best way to request deep links?

Give people the complete HTML code. As long as you don't go overboard with styles/bold/italics or some other formating, most people will just copy and paste. Webmasters are just as lazy as everybody else.

nuevojefe




msg:410160
 12:14 am on Jun 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

Craig_F,

Exactly. I was scanning the post to see if someone added that already.

It has a catch though too. If you do this many times you'll have someone saying "hey, i can get 100 links... I can beat that guy", only to have him realize 3 months later why you're doing so well. Now he is vested. Now he'll probably try to keep going.

Overall, it's a good strategy other than losing the intimidation factor if you've got a ton of links.

rmjvol




msg:410161
 2:35 am on Jun 22, 2004 (gmt 0)

About the only downside of encouraging deep linking is that you have a more complicated situation if/when you need to redesign the site's navigation structure or the naming convention.

I'm getting into a situation like this where I have quite a few natural deep links to my internal pages. We're doing some extra work to ensure that those pages remain at the current url. That's what made the most sense on this site.

rmjvol

neuron




msg:410162
 6:54 am on Jun 23, 2004 (gmt 0)

When requesting links, include a link to a page in which you have explained different ways to link to you. Include in this page many text links linking to different pages (different anchor text also), a couple of banners, etc. Make sure to include the HTML code in a form field, so they can simply copy it and paste it on their site.

This way, you'll get all kinds of varied links, and they look "natural".


Exactly, but instead of putting up a page with dozens of links they can select from, create a dynamic page that displays a set of 2 or 3 pre-coded links that they can cut and paste. The 2 or 3 displayed are drawn from a text file or a database of potentially hundreds of pre-coded HTML snippets. Each can be pointed to a different page or in some variation 50% to your home page and 50% to other pages.

If you have links on every page to your home page, a standard site nav menu, then some of that incoming PR will be passed on to the home page, and some to other pages that will in turn pass some PR on to the homepage, so your PR is simply being distributed accross a wider semantic topology, provided you use appropiate link text to map to those deep pages that are also optimized for similar terms.

The way I do it is on the home page I will have major keyword links to optimized pages, not on the menu, to pages that have lots of links to other optimized pages on the site. I'll then write 2 or 3 variations of the anchor text and the description. Let's say I did 3. Then for each of these 3, I will link 2 of them to the deep page and 1 to the home page. Now I have 9 available links for that one inner page, but 3 of those nine I direct to the home page, where there is also a link to that inner page using the exact same anchor text (if not a wee bit more). If I have 8 main inner pages I want to deliver these to, I create a set of nine links to each and I have 72 possible link options, of which 48 will point at 8 different inner page, and 24 will point to the home page, a ratio of 1/3 to the home page. I can change this ratio by creating more or less pages for the inner pages.

Later, the ratio or even presence of these terms can be modified to meet the needs of the site. If a page maxes out, and you need to concentrate on other terms then you can lean your database in that direction, or you can add more if you see weaknesses in areas. By only posting 2 or 3 samples at a time it makes it easier to steer the site when leaned.

It is possible that deep-linking creates a cross-lateral bracing effect, a reinforcement on the topological hill, an affirmation of your semantic presence.

A tree, skinny and tall, stands like a spike on the side of a hill. Our tree is a single keyterm, but it is not recognized as being part of the hill because it only has a single topological point of presence. That point is so disjoint from those around it that it must be a tree, for hilltops are somewhat rounded, and though sometimes spikey, they always have points on at least some sides of them that have topologically related coordinates.

Every keyterm has topologically related others, its neighbors on the semantic landscape. By emulating that topology, by registering coodinate hits, with links, across the breadth of the hilltop, you contribute components to the hilltop, becoming part of the hilltop.

So, a tree would be a site with links of only a single variety pointing only at their home page, and a site becomes part of the hill that incorporates a broad set of semantically varying coordinate links deep into the topological landscape. So, not only is it important to get deep links, but you can get more bang for your buck if you use a variety of keyterms.

caspita




msg:410163
 9:30 pm on Jun 23, 2004 (gmt 0)

You guys rock!

A lot of work to do now! ..

Thanks!

zk21




msg:410164
 2:54 pm on Jun 29, 2004 (gmt 0)


We all have a lot of work to do now! Great posts here!

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