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Assigning a Dollar Amount Per Page of Content
How Much Does a Page Earn Per Year?
gendude

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 2:38 pm on Feb 14, 2006 (gmt 0)

I found this very interesting.

It's an interview at Wired [wired.com] with Harold Davis, a longtime AdSense user.

For those of you who always wonder about how much content you need, or if it's worth it, or if it's better to not worry about content, you might find some answers. A quote from the article:

As for money, people who are really in the business of making a living off content pages say they average about $10 a page per year.

I find this number quite reasonable - it's not going to match every type of blog, far from it, but I think that if you assign a dollar amount to every page you write, even if you are very conservative in the amount, I think when you measure it out over the course of a year, you'll have a good idea of the worth, as well as what you should strive for.

Too many people are like "well I have 30 pages of content, why can't I make more money", maybe it'll inspire them, make them realize that it's not as easy as throwing up a few dozen pages and expecting the bucks to roll in.

[edited by: jatar_k at 5:29 pm (utc) on Feb. 14, 2006]

 

jomaxx

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jomaxx us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 3:10 am on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

In theory, you could get triple or quadruple the income from a doubling of pages--or very little additional revenue, if the pages are duds.

Exactly, which is why this measurement has a certain amount of descriptive value but not much predictive value.

dibbern2

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 4:34 am on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I am amazed to learn that return/page isn't a virtual rule of business. It is in mine, and I couldn't come to work each day without it as a guide to how I will invest my time.

I figure along the lines of 21_blue: it takes a set time to produce a page of content (research, writing, design, programming, tweaking, and polishing + my overhead ) and that's my investment. I need to make a profit on that investment, the sooner the better. If it's a day a page, then that's a $250 investment for me.

When I add a page of content, I target for $1 a day ($365 per year) in revenue from that new page. At that rate, it takes about 8 months to break even.

I estimate a 2-3 year life to the page, so the final profit is okay, but hardly grand.

At first, I rarely hit the the target. Now its about 60% of my tries.

If I can close the 4 months-to-break-even to anything less, that's extra profit; so a $1.50/day/page average is on the target horizon.

Is this a stupid number? In my opinion, only if you don't care how you spend your time.

joaquin112

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 4:56 am on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

Very interesting indeed. For example, writing a thousand pages worth 10 dollars/year each will bring 10,000 dollars/year which is not to good.

However, if by the second year you write another 1,000 pages then you will be getting 10,000 plus the other 10,000 making it 20,000 and so on. That's without counting niche/optimization. Maybe it's better to view websites as a long-term profit - opposed to short-term which is what noobies like to do.

I wonder what the value of a forum page a year is? Possibly about 50 cents... but still, get a million of those and you're rich.

jetteroheller

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jetteroheller us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 8:44 am on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I am amazed to learn that return/page isn't a virtual rule of business. It is in mine, and I couldn't come to work each day without it as a guide to how I will invest my time.

As I started my first of the thread "I could save 3 people", I calulated for him, what he can reach in one year.

Daily production of pages * 365 * monthly average value of one page = monthly revenues.

I can do this, because he is since 1998 my internet promotion client, I know his traffic, one of my AdSense sites it in a thematic similar direction, so I can predict +-20% with this method.

jetteroheller

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jetteroheller us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 9:46 am on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

However, if by the second year you write another 1,000 pages then you will be getting 10,000 plus the other 10,000 making it 20,000 and so on

Sounds very similar to my calculation.

That's why I have since April 2005 a press card.
That's why I have the next weeks a tight schedule visiting fairs.

gendude

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 2:45 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

dibbern2: I am amazed to learn that return/page isn't a virtual rule of business. It is in mine, and I couldn't come to work each day without it as a guide to how I will invest my time.

Wow, you really study this. I just liked the thought of using this as motivation, but you've got me to thinking on a few things.

joaquin112: Maybe it's better to view websites as a long-term profit - opposed to short-term which is what noobies like to do.

It's always better to view them as long-term profit, but I think a lot of people are wanting the instant-gratification that the internet falsely lures them into thinking exists.

I've found, as have others, that a lot of time, my older pages bring in a large amount of traffic when you look at the overall picture. A lot of people don't look past a month or two, but when you add up all of the page visits for individual pages over six months or a year, sometimes that can be an incredibly substantial number.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 10 posted 4:00 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

However, if by the second year you write another 1,000 pages then you will be getting 10,000 plus the other 10,000 making it 20,000 and so on. That's without counting niche/optimization. Maybe it's better to view websites as a long-term profit - opposed to short-term which is what noobies like to do.

You've identified an important point: the value of "evergreen" content, which offers a growth path instead of requiring the publisher to start over when opportunities wither for datafeed affiliate sites, MFA scraper sites, or whatever the current fad may be.

However, there are some caveats:

- On the Web, the term "content" is often taken to mean "filler." A lot of people that anybody can write (or hire some $5-a-day freelancer in Uzbekistan to write) useful articles by the bucketload. In reality, the job is much tougher, and it certainly isn't an easy path to riches.

- Not every page has the same value, and just adding 1,000 pages to your 1,000-page site won't necessarily double your income. There may also be a practical limit to what you can earn within any given niche. For example, a travel site about North America might be able to support 50,000 profitable pages, but you might reach the point of diminishing returns if your travel site about Seattle exceeded 500 pages. (Which isn't to say that the second 500 pages about Seattle would be a complete bust; they just wouldn't earn anywhere near the income of the first 500 pages, assuming that you'd already covered the city's most important and obvious travel topics.)

jetteroheller

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jetteroheller us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 5:05 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

Not every page has the same value

But it's also not possible to predict the value of a page of from 30 pages.

But over several hundred pages, the statistic up and downs even out.

dibbern2

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 6:34 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I respectfully disagree. It is possible -within your expectations- to place a revenue value on every page you make.

Lets say that I made 3 pages 6 months ago. Call them A, B, and C.

My records show that A has generated no revenue at all. B is making $1 a day, and C is making $1.50 a day.

Its well worth my time to look at what makes B & C different.

Now I sit down today to make a new page. Should I make it following the model of A? No. If I can determine what makes C so valuable, then that's how I'll proceed to build a new page. And with that, I will estimate that my new page will earn me between a buck and a buck-fifty a day.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 10 posted 6:38 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

And with that, I will estimate that my new page will earn me between a buck and a buck-fifty a day.

Will all traffic on that page originate from within your site? If not, where will it come from? Will you rely on organic search referrals? And if that's what you're planning, how will you know that you'll get the same number of search referrals to the new page as you've been getting to the comparable existing page?

21_blue

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 6:58 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

how will you know that you'll get the same number of search referrals to the new page as you've been getting to the comparable existing page

Dibbern's example is excellent. He doesn't 'know', of course, but that is not the point. Almost all predictions of earnings will be wrong, but the purpose of a prediction is not to be 'correct', but to support forward-looking decisions.

A prediction is simply an estimate. Initially, they may be no more than guesses, though one can get better at making estimates by reviewing past estimates against actual performance.

And the real value of good estimates is not in deriving any satisfaction of accuracy - there will always be uncontrollable factors causing variations. Rather, the value is in supporting your decision-making as to where to invest your time, ie: ROI.

Ultimately, the benefit of dibbern's approach will be to maximise the revenue being earned from the effort invested.

jetteroheller

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jetteroheller us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 7:11 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

My records show that A has generated no revenue at all. B is making $1 a day, and C is making $1.50 a day

And? That's complete not practical.

There are not infinite opportunities to collect material to write pages similar to A, B, C.

When there is no opportunity for something like C, writing B or eben A is more profitable.

gendude

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 8:30 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

And? That's complete not practical.

It can be practical.

To use a car analogy example, since it's so broad, if you write about cars and brands from Ford, and you track pages, and you notice that pages talking about the Ford Focus and Ford Taurus cars don't generate much in the way of income, but pages talking about Ford Mustangs and Volvos do generate a lot of income, it makes sense to put future stories/content about Mustangs or Volvos ahead of future stories/content about a Focus or Taurus.

It's not that you should necessarily neglect the Focus or Taurus areas, but if you have ideas for stories to write about all of these, it makes more sense to write about the higher-income producing cars first.

sonny

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 10:18 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

I wish I could pay myself $250 for every new page I create. I figure $2 a month/per new page & that's about what I'm getting.

Of course, my content doesn't compare the inherent flaws of an ethanol based energy program vs. the environmental and sociological impact of wind driven energy!

Hmmmm....maybe it should!

dibbern2

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 10:24 pm on Feb 15, 2006 (gmt 0)

There are times when you have to create an A (zero revenue) page: the site needs it to be complete, or you cover the subject as gendude states, or whatever.

What you don't want is to make A pages when a C would accomplish the same job. And when you make an A page, you should add it to your overhead... it increases the base cost of all your other pages.

The worst thing, in my opinion, would be to work with no idea of what you are creating from a revenue and cost potential. Which brings us back to the discussion as to wether revenue-per-page is a worthy factor.

pockan

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 5:45 pm on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

okay but how can you make $1 per page per day?

any way interesting!

just explain how can i make a dollar per page (every day).

Is it a dream or what else? if it is a fact I want to know that.

just let me know

- Pockan

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 6:14 pm on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

I am amazed to learn that return/page isn't a virtual rule of business. It is in mine, and I couldn't come to work each day without it as a guide to how I will invest my time.

I work by that, too, and take it a step further. I know how much each of my sites makes per page per day, and then for each site I calculate how many pages I can make in a day. Some sites may make more per page but they also take longer to put up a page. Then I add in an overhead factor for things like renewing domains, reading WebmasterWorld and link building, so I have a pretty good idea of what I make per hour.

europeforvisitors



 
Msg#: 10 posted 6:46 pm on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

Then I add in an overhead factor for things like renewing domains, reading WebmasterWorld and link building, so I have a pretty good idea of what I make per hour.

Why does it matter what you make per hour (unless you're taking time away from hourly employment or freelance jobs to work on your Web sites)?

Jane_Doe

WebmasterWorld Senior Member jane_doe us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 8:10 pm on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

Why does it matter what you make per hour (unless you're taking time away from hourly employment or freelance jobs to work on your Web sites)?

It helps me to: 1) know what sites make the most amount of money for the least amount of effort; 2) to evaluate the cost effectiveness of unsolicited consulting work and job offers that come my way from time to time; 3) know when it is cost effective to hire someone to do tasks that otherwise I would have to do myself; and 4) allocate my time between my web work and some offline projects.

dibbern2

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 10:09 pm on Mar 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

Another factor that I use is based on the cost-per-hour, and its the days until profitability.

If my time and costs are $200 to make a theoretical page, and the estimated earnings are $1.00/day, then I know I won't recoup my time investment for more than 6 months.

This is a quick tool that helps when deciding between two courses of action: work on A or work on B?

Harold Davis

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 8:53 pm on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

To jump in here, when I provided the $10 per page per year figure, I felt it was a bit on the low side. Of course, based on my own experience, some of my pages make a great deal more than this, and some much less (well, zero!). But I did get the $10 figure quoted as a ballpark from a number of sources.

My point really is to help readers (many of whom are much more naive than posters to this forum, or people who look at Webmaster World in the first place) understand that this is a business, and if they are serious about making money with it, they need to consider ROI and the other issues that go into business. I do not advocate keyword chasing (I don't do it myself) but it is again naive not to discuss the possibility in context.

Great forum, interesting discussion!

jatar_k

WebmasterWorld Administrator jatar_k us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 9:10 pm on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

Welcome to WebmasterWorld Harold

Harold Davis

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 10 posted 9:21 pm on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

Thanks Jatar!

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