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SuperPages to sell Google and Yahoo
Chicago

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 2:43 pm on Jul 25, 2005 (gmt 0)

ClickZ has a good article. [clickz.com]

Its official, EVERYONE now sells Google and Yahoo and EVERYONE thinks they are an agency.

 

loco

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 8:09 pm on Jul 25, 2005 (gmt 0)

I think this makes a lot of sense since many small businesses have either little willingless or know how to get into Yahoo and Google. It will be good for Yahoo and Google as well since they don't have a sales force that can contact those small advertisers. Finally, I think it will be good for the user since they will have real local content. This should be a win win for everybody.

Chicago

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 1:24 am on Jul 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

Welcome to WebmasterWorld, Loco.

Stick around, please. Share more of your thoughts.

i must say i find this interesting:

"Our biggest challenge is these people are giving us more money than we can spend in our network," he said. "We've secured $65 million in budgets, but we're not able to spend that in our own network. There's a lot more money in that existing pool of advertisers. If we could spend all of what they gave us, they would increase their budgets even more."

followed by:

The campaigns will initially be sold on a flat fee basis, but that's likely to change.

"We'll be adjusting our... fee structures, " said Chandler. "We're going to be moving more to a percentage of spend going forward. That lines up more with how existing SEMs charge."

This from a company with an existing bidded inventory model.

One may be argue that concentrating on one's own product development/destination needs, as opposed to ad distribution trends may be in the long term best interest of an organization not prone to changing as quickly as other value-add aggregators. One whose traditional life-line has been destination and advertiser value.

Shoot. Nevermind. Everything changes, when I remind myself that right now it is just about *getting* and *spending* the SME's first interactive ad dollars.

Of course Verizon and Google are strong partners.

Of course Google and BellSouth, and SmartPages, and YellowPages, and Dex are strong partners.

...Looking beyong today ~I know, its hard in Local Search ~ Where can a partnership like this lead to?

A quicker death of Yellow, a quicker legal marriage between G/Y and Telco, a much needed life-line for Yellow as they transition to into its own web-safe color?

Robert Charlton

WebmasterWorld Administrator robert_charlton us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member Top Contributors Of The Month



 
Msg#: 163 posted 8:12 am on Jul 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

Very interesting article. The theme of this to me is that, at this stage, size is a great advantage in marketing local search. It may take a very large entity like Superpages to attract and deal with the multitude of very small clients that local search represents.

Many regional business owners lacking the time and expertise to manage a self-service search marketing campaign.

And they don't have the time to seek out a good provider either, so they go to the largest, most convenient source.

I sometimes like to use models from physics to describe human behavior. In this case, I'd draw a rough analogy with the principles of gravitational attraction....

f =G(M1M2/d2)

"f" is the force of gravity
"G" is the gravitational constant
"M1" is the mass of object 1
"M2" is the mass of object 2
"d" is the distance between the two objects

...ie, the force of gravity between two objects is proportional to the product of their masses, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

To get a given force, "f"... if M1 is very small, then M2 must be very large.

Similarly, as the distance between the objects increases, for a given force, the product of the masses has to go up exponentially. If M1 is very small and "d" is large, then M2 needs to grow huge to attract M1. I won't belabor this, and I may not really be saying anything new, but I think it's a helpful view.

The article concludes...

Earlier this month, Verizon SuperPages.com revamped its Web site, and the company recently partnered with Martindale Hubble and Psychology Today to offer users searchable listings on lawyers and psychologists by region.

I'm reminded that, six years ago, I consulted on structuring and optimizing a regional directory of psychologists, to start in the Bay Area and ultimately go national. I still have the NDA in my filing cabinet, but the domain is no longer registered and I think I'm safe in mentioning it. The project never could get enough listings locally to be useful to anyone. Seems obvious now that large companies would be required, but, at the time, the major players who perhaps can achieve this critical mass had hardly begun to evolve.

MoneyMan

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 2:42 pm on Jul 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

The campaigns will initially be sold on a flat fee basis, but that's likely to change.
"We'll be adjusting our... fee structures, " said Chandler. "We're going to be moving more to a percentage of spend going forward. That lines up more with how existing SEMs charge."

It sounds like the model may not be a guaranteed click model like the other large SME aggregators have instituted. If that is the case, I believe this would be the first instance of a large SME aggregator not adopting the guaranteed click model. I for one hope their gamble proves successful for the sake of pushing the market further along the adoption curve in understanding and comfort with a PPC spend.

Robert, I love the physics analogy. I remember Jake using a reference to Occam's razor in some post once as well. It provides an interesting perspective on business.

loco

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 3:49 pm on Jul 26, 2005 (gmt 0)

Google and Yahoo have created a giant eco systems that many companies are living off. Using this analogy, from the small advertisers view point, is a jungle out there. If you think about it, yellow pages were the original search engine and the defacto advertising agency for small businesses. Most ad agencies were either unable or unwilling to deal with small businesses becasue their spend was too low for their cost structures similar to what is happening with SEM/SEO agencies. Most small businesses are not technically savvy not because they are ignorant but because they are too busy running their businesses. Yellow pages or SuperPages.com have catered to the needs of small businesses for decades and have created a trusted relationship that will be hard to break. I think yellowpages are the prefect guides to the jungle of search on the Internet.

shorebreak

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 163 posted 4:33 am on Aug 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

While in the short term this means Verizon Superpages needs to grow its network, who better than they to become a great local search destination? Local search results on G & Y stink right now, and V.S. has a huge salesforce to transition their advertisers over to search.

Google & Yahoo are taking everyone's $$ right now, but at some point the collective spend of all these advertisers earns them repeat users who user Google/Yahoo/MSN that much less and type in URLs or click bookmarks that much more often.

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