homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.161.240.10
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Pubcon Platinum Sponsor 2014
Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / Webmaster General
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: phranque & physics

Webmaster General Forum

    
NerdTV - Start of something Big?
Brett_Tabke




msg:355352
 4:01 pm on Sep 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

Uber geek Robert X. Cringely's [pubcon.com] long awaited web cast, NerdTV, starts next week.
[pbs.org...]

...what makes NerdTV different and gives it unique value is that it is something you would never see on TV. Never. Not even on the most esoteric distance learning channel or the poorest-produced local cable access show, much less from a national television network with a global reputation. That PBS would take such a gamble on the intelligence of its audience is breathtaking and I, as the guy who came up with this idea, can only marvel at their willingness to experiment.

I am excited about what Cringely has been working on for over three years. His PBS columns having been growing in quality, depth, and core significance since his Infoworld days.

What sets this apart is that Cringely has become somewhat of a tech maven and a history teacher wrapped-in-one. His work in 1996 on Triumph of the Nerds [pbs.org] was the first major mainstream broadcast to accurately reflect computer history.

As we went through the internet revolution, those of us alert and present in the micro computer revolution of the 80's were astounded and infuriated at the brazen attempt by the winners at rewriting computer history. Cringelys work on Triumph of the Nerds put a finger in the dam to at least slow down those playing fast and loose with the truth. Without "Nerds", our historical backdrop of the late 70's and early 80's would look entirely different today. The ability of major corporations to rewrite history and meld minds is staggering. For that, we should all be a bit thankful to Cringely for fighting the good fight.

I can't help but think that the new NerdTV will be culturally significant to the internet. This is not a revolutionary event, but it is a watershed event. RXC has a strong enough following that this show is going to get a look by big players. Those same players have been setting on the internet video broadcast sidelines while internet radio took off via podcasting. While radio is do-able under moderate bandwidth needs, video had has has a huge overhead involved with it. As bandwidth costs have steadily fallen over the last few years, video is slowly - ever so slowly - becoming viable. NerdTV may be the internet video tipping point we have been waiting for ...

You can also see Robert X. Cringley at Pubcon Vegas [pubcon.com]...

 

walrus




msg:355353
 5:15 pm on Sep 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

I've been really impressed with PBS online, especially TVO. great stuff, Looking forward to this new feature, thanks for the heads up.

night707




msg:355354
 6:56 pm on Sep 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

Fascinating point are, that old school Television will be missing more and more audience and that more formats, stations and creators of videos will emerge.

Craven de Kere




msg:355355
 10:38 pm on Sep 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

One of my projects is a web-based reality show that starts filiming next week. Naturally, I too hope that this kicks off the next level of web-based video.

Web video needs to move beyond porn.

ratherbeboating




msg:355356
 11:54 pm on Sep 2, 2005 (gmt 0)

There was a Nerdtv that was started, almost made it and then failed before this Nerdtv started. They let their domain expire because it was the best thing to do from a business point of view, and then this new group came along, coincidentally applying the same URL to the same concepts.

Chris_D




msg:355357
 3:08 am on Sep 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

I still have my original copy of "Accidental Empires" from the early 1990's. I worked in the PC industry from the mid 1980's until 2001 - the book was a fabulous industry insight - so much so that I actually bought several copies and sent them to colleagues at the time.

reli




msg:355358
 4:05 am on Sep 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

Lower the barriers to entry and it will be good and bad. With my neighbors making professional-quality DVDs of their vacations, I think PBS will have to consider that they are opening the door to the ultimate medium for "public broadcasting". I know people who make essentially 'hidden' documentaries that would never see the light of day on PBS... but these will all be online somewhere in the near future: the home movies and the hidden gems. And, I thought the BBC was going to put their entire library online over time?.

And given the Hurricane Katrina/New Orleans scope vs. available tv coverage, I hope there are many more basement DVD authors pumping out their stories and experiences to share with the world, via online delivery.

Anyone up for an hour of my Aunt Edna and her thoughts on this danged tacknology?!

ronin




msg:355359
 10:45 am on Sep 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

As we went through the internet revolution, those of us alert and present in the micro computer revolution of the 80's were astounded and infuriated at the brazen attempt by the winners at rewriting computer history. Cringelys work on Triumph of the Nerds put a finger in the dam to at least slow down those playing fast and loose with the truth. Without "Nerds", our historical backdrop of the late 70's and early 80's would look entirely different today.

I am intrigued by this, Brett. In a nutshell what was the history as Cringely told it in "Nerds" and what was the revisionist version being put out at the time by the winners?

dataguy




msg:355360
 12:42 pm on Sep 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

It's been years, but as I remember it, Bill Gates stole the Graphical User Interface from Steve Jobs, and Steve Jobs stole the concept of the mouse from Xerox. Instead of Corporate espionage between Microsoft and Apple, it was more like zit-faced college kids trying to one-up each other. IBM and Xerox were just big corporations that didn't know what they had, so it was taken from them by people who knew what to do with it.

I do remember the mantra that Steve Jobs kept repeating: "A good artist copies, a great artist steals.", which apparently is a quote from the great artist Picasso himself. And they say that history repeats itself. Hmmmmm.

I think the spin has been that Microsoft and Apple have come up with good ideas on their own, which many people accept as fact. Truth is that if you dig a little, most of the new ideas you see from both camps were either bought or stolen from someone else. (or in Microsoft's case, bought, copied, and returned for a full refund.)

blaze




msg:355361
 5:25 pm on Sep 3, 2005 (gmt 0)

RCX has impressed me as well.

The question is though - can he keep up that kind of quality?

I think a lot of his better stuff has come from hard work and careful thought. I'm not sure he can turn out that sort of material on a consistent basis, at least not without long periods in between shows.

IanTurner




msg:355362
 8:41 pm on Sep 5, 2005 (gmt 0)

I thought that Jobs stole the entire GUI idea from Xerox's Palo Alto research centre and then had it stolen again by Microsoft.

I can certainly remember working on Windows based systems in the mid 80s - Xerox Star and Daybreak workstations both ran Windows GUIs.

[en.wikipedia.org...]

seofan




msg:355363
 5:20 am on Sep 6, 2005 (gmt 0)

The concept is good and is being done on [scwebtv.com...] and [rtptv.com...] - those have been around a while.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / WebmasterWorld / Webmaster General
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved