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Produce a new page every day!?
Liane




msg:382640
 4:14 am on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

In comparison to many WebMasterWorld members, my site is quite small with only 116 pages. I keep reading about sites with thousands of pages and am always amazed by these numbers!

Recently, I have had some time on my hands and am litterally killing myself (well maybe not literally) ... but I am completely exhausted trying to do my best to add valuable "photo" and "editorial" content to my site.

I have been spending 10 to 12 hours a day (for several weeks) trying to produce a photo gallery of my tiny part of the world. So far, nobody else has done this and I am already finding my efforts to be of value as increased traffic is being realized.

However ... I have to question how realistic it is to produce one page per day as Brett and others have previously recommended? One page every three or four days is my norm and that is going full tilt!

Do the majority of members find you are adding content for content value from which your clients will benifit ... every single day ... or do you add content strictly for keyword and traffic value?

If for the latter ... does it pay off for you. Am I waisting my time and energy doing this photo gallery, which is an enormous ... and I'm talking, "elephant sized" ... pain in the rear?

Is there an easier way to add pages to a subject which I have already virtually exhausted ... or is a photo gallery the way to go?

I have a travel site and am very curious how others approach this sort of thing. Man ... I've got to tell you that photo galleries (for someone who has no training in photography) are really tough! I am my own worst critic and tend to throw out more than half of the photos I take.

It makes it tough when you live in a place with more than 60 islands and cays. The cost in time and travel is horrendous! The mistakes and just plain lousy photography on my part make it twice as frustrating.

You considered comments and thoughts are appreciated. :)

 

SEOMike




msg:382641
 6:55 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

I've found that adding rich content weekly has worked well for my clients. The way it's been going is we post an archive of their past newsletters (chock full of industry content / keywords) and have seen an increase in the SERPs and in traffic. It's not as an aggressive as approach as Brett’s, but it seems to get the job done for me.

zulufox




msg:382642
 7:26 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

I use both... about 75% content and 25% keyword

Keyword Value: Attracts visitors
Content Value: Retains visitors

I fear your pain with the one item a day problem.

In a week I am going to start 30 days of writing 10-15 hours a day, hoping to get 200-300 articles by september... so we will see how it goes.

1milehgh80210




msg:382643
 9:59 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

"One page every three or four days is my norm and that is going full tilt"

Thats because you are actually creating quality ORIGINAL content. A lot (most) of the people w/ the mega thousand page websites are using
Affiliate Datafeeds
Content written by others (forums)Some forums are great, some notso.
Content written by others (rewritten with trusty thesaurus)
Software generated spam pages.
Plus the term -page- doesnt really mean much. It could be a 1 sentence page.

There are a lot of large (quality) sites on the net, but out of the total, the % is quite small IMO.

Liane




msg:382644
 10:37 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Thats because you are actually creating quality ORIGINAL content. A lot (most) of the people w/ the mega thousand page websites are using Affiliate Datafeeds

OK ... so maybe I'm not actually as incompetent as I was beginning to believe! :)

I honestly could not produce a page a day no matter how hard I tried. I spent a full day (2 weeks ago) going to one island and photographing everything in sight.

So far, I have managed to produce three out of 4 pages for that ONE island. Today, I had to go back and take more photos of the same island because some of the previous shots were just not acceptable for one reason or another, plus I discovered a few things I had missed the first time around.

Cost to date to produce those 4 pages is about $540.00 in ferry costs, taxis, car rentals and hiring someone to replace me for the day. Add to that dozens of hours editing photos and writing the pages ... while still doing my job.

There are several more pages (about 25 to 30) to be added until I will have completed the photo gallery. I figure this project will take me the better part of a year ... if I am to do it properly and completely. By then, it will be time to start over again as the islands change frequently.

How do others in the travel industry handle photo galleries? Are they worth the time and trouble?

paybacksa




msg:382645
 10:51 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

You are mising alot of oppty if you ask me.

Start with one new photo that you consider worthy of retouching and posting as a premier shot.

Add it in low res to a "thumbnails page" of recent shots. (another page)

Add it in higher res with text describing how you got it.. ferry ride, who you visited, where you shot it, photographic details, etc.. tell the story of your adventure out onto the island to get the shot. Why you chose that spot, why you waited for what time you shot it, etc. Page two. Links to a page about nature photography on the islands, photoshops, guides, your restouched photo gallery, etc. If you are progresive, you will have already added a blog to your site, so this is all blog content.

Add it to the "coming soon to the gallery" page, along with some notes on why it's not there yet (how you intend to retouch it, why it is an important photo for your site, why it is representative of something about the islands, etc). Page 3 at least. Links to all of the other pages of interest, etc..

Finally after retouching, post it to the gallery, with the important text. Link to your site content. Page 4.

One photo... more than 4 pages easy.

Consider how each of these may get indexed differently, bringing a fresh visitor to your site. Each page becomes an ambassadour for the rest of your site (an entry page), and I consider each of these pages I described as worthy ambassadour pages for different visitor types -- so I would optimize them to attract those types via content and keywords (photographer, seeker of photo services on islands, seker of photos of islands, etc etc etc).

I don't know about you, but my digital SLR shoots up to 9 frames per second and I typically shoot 200-300 images per small assignment. I see no reason why side galleries of those unretouched raw images shouldn't be added to a site as long as they are properly described and linked. They all provide opportunity for attracting customers. A typical gallery program would enable you to get 10-20 pages out of that many images.. if you spend the effort documenting your intent, it is often enough to satisfy the content requirement.

zulufox




msg:382646
 11:06 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

So far, I have managed to produce three out of 4 pages for that ONE island.

I dont know the details, but if you spent 540 to do that trip, I would of tried to pull out atleast 40 articles from that.

Think about the trip and think about EVERY possible article:

Hotel Review (2-100 possible articles)
Hotel Tips
Getting Through Customs
What to take
What not to take
Where to eat
where not to eat
How to tip
Whom to tip
Guide to getting a taxi
Guide to the language
Language Cheatsheet
Ferry Guide
Good things to look at on the ferry
Tips for finding cheap ferry tickets
Places to find cheap ferry tickets
Should you bring a backpack or a suitcase?
Honeymooner's guide to the island
Businessman's Guide to the island
Student's Guide to the island
Independent Traveler's Guide to the island
Best Beaches
Worst Beaches
Most overrated beaches
Hidden Beaches
Best Beaches for Surfing
Best Beaches for BoogieBoarding
Best Beaches for Windsailing
Where to learn how to surf
Where to learn how to windsurf
Best way travel TO the island
Best way to travel AROUND the island
Cultural Guide to the island
History Lover's Guide to the island
Partier's Guide to the island
Guide to wierd laws on the island
Guide to driving on the island
etc... etc...

conroy




msg:382647
 11:33 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

writing 10-15 hours a day, hoping to get 200-300 articles by september

So, let's break this down. That is about 40 days worth of work. Let's use the low end of 10 hours a day. And let's use the high end and say that you get 300 articles done.

Your total working time is 400 hours. That works out to 1.3 articles per hour. This is a best situation example giving the numbers you listed.

I can contract out to extremely good writers for $15 per article - 600+ words. So for 300 articles, I would pay $4500. So, using the basis of $15 per article (and you can get it done cheaper) for 40 days of work, you are working at $112.50 per day or $3375 per month or $11.25 per hour.

You need to make the decision on whether your time is worth more or less than that. The other thing that must be considered is opportunity cost. What else could you have done with those 400 hours? Could you make a lot more money doing something else and let someone else do the writing?

Of course, if you have no money this isn't an option. Or if you think $11.25 per hour is good, or if you love to work on your site, then writing the articles might be good for you.

I think it is important to actually look at the numbers though.

iamlost




msg:382648
 11:34 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

There are two parts to web page "production" (assuming original content). The first is research, the second design/layout/code/test.

In your instance of research requiring travel and photography the time requirement will be larger than reading books/web surfing for data. In your instance - well done! Two days per page is great.

A professional photographer provided "travel" shots for a client whose site I developed and she spent two weeks, took over 25,000 photos which she went through to pick out the "best" couple of hundred. I have to admit the results were spectacular but was very happy not to have to foot her bill. What the cost would have been in the old non-digital days I shudder to think. She took that number so she never had to backtrack.

You did not say but your site size is on the cusp of static/dynamic performance benefits. For example: one dynamically served "template" page design reusable for each island (or other sub-category) with another dynamically served "template" page design to display the individual pictures with appropriate text content will cut the "design/code" part of page production considerably.

It's a variation of a typical ecommerce category/product display page setup (and how they manage to produce their thousands of pages) that I think looks more professional than the typical photo "gallery" systems out there.

zulufox is quite correct. Consider other uses of the information you collect, not just as providing pretty pics but as providing pretty pics to illustrate the money grubbing (and major text/link/keyword) potential pages that each island provides. His list will do as a start to keep you busy!

To recap: to travel, take photos, muck with photos, write text content, combine in a compliant, compatible, accessible page layout at the rate of one page per every two days is above and beyond. Take a deep breath, look in the mirror, pat yourself on the back, and tell yourself you are GOOD. You are!

zulufox




msg:382649
 11:43 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

conroy-

Thanks for the offer, but being a college student means 2 things:

1. I have no money

2. I have TONS of time

Sort of limits me to writing me own work... anyways, I am also hoping to become a better writer (for my career in academia) so I need all the practice I can get.

ownerrim




msg:382650
 11:59 pm on Jul 18, 2004 (gmt 0)

Original content takes a little time, especially if you:

1. want visitors to book mark the site
2. want visitors to recommend the site
3. want the site to be of real value which will bring
one and two

and--

4. want the individual pages of the site to stand out
in the serps and garner genuine organic traffic.

The thing that you do not find much of on the entire net is this: sites with real content that draws visitors and, at the same time, is adequately researched and, oh, decently written.

When I surf the web myself, one of the things I hate most is finding content that's been shuffled around between ten or fifteen different sites and only modestly altered as it's made the rounds. Nothing genuine there. And users can smell it like dung.

Webwork




msg:382651
 12:25 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

My bathroom reading material includes Smithsonian Magazine and Scientific American, but every once in a great while I buy a copy of Cosmo. I need to see if there have been any advances in relationships, style and what turns guys on. I wait another 2 years and buy another copy of Cosmo, even though I know there's nothing new under the sun in relationships, style and what turns guys on.

Which leads me to ask: Who are you writing for and, in consequence, who are you excluding? I may not be Cosmo's demographic, but my research runs far and wide.

Unleash your trashiness. Translated: Self-critical analysis is as much an asset as an impediment. Write for everyone. You never know where your next lead may come from: Some bored teen points out an article to his friend, who shows it to his father, who was thinking about a vacation, who . . . you know how it goes.

[edited by: Webwork at 12:42 am (utc) on July 19, 2004]

zulufox




msg:382652
 12:25 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

If I were you, I'd go to amazon.com and look at the index page (you can do that) of a lonely planet guide to aruba or something.

That should give you hundreds of article ideas...

wackybrit




msg:382653
 12:31 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

I can contract out to extremely good writers for $15 per article - 600+ words.

If they're millionaires who'll work for $15 an article because they love you and sincerely love their art, then I'll go along with that. Otherwise, I'll say they're writers who are so poor at selling themselves that they have no option but to work for your scraps, or they're living on a desert island with no bills to pay.. not the usual setup, however.

bedlam




msg:382654
 1:59 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

I can contract out to extremely good writers for $15 per article - 600+ words.

2.5 cents per word? Low-end editing costs a lot more than that, and editing comes cheaper than content creation. This has got to be either a) delusional, b) false, c) exploitation of someone's unfortunate circumstances, or d) done by writers whose first language is not the language they're writing in...

-B

Liane




msg:382655
 2:06 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Wow ... great feedback guys and girls! Many thanks for all your input.

I am not rich and am very ... well ... "picky" about my site. I am the same way about my business. I can't afford to hire a professional photographer but at the same time, I don't want garbage on the site either.

As far as hiring a professional writer, that's not an option. I do very well for myself writing for the web. Each of my pages does quite well in producing targeted traffic.

Every last bit of content and 99.9% of all photographs on the site are my own. One of the things these treks to take photos has done for me is force me to become familiar (once again) with all the islands in my part of the world.

I was very surprised to find how "out of touch' I had become with the nitty gritty details my customers want to know! So ... as difficult and time consuming as the photo gallery may be to produce, it has provided valuable and updated information about the islands as they are today.

You know how it goes, we become complacent and sometimes don't have a clue about what is happening right next door. A visitor suddenly appears and asks you what you think about what happened next door last week. You sit there with your face hanging out!

You live and work there! You should know what happened ... but you are as much in the dark as someone from Doodangania who has never set foot in your part of the world!

paybacksa and zulufox have finally made me understand how people grow their sites to thousands of pages.

Whilst I do appreciate the detailed responses, I think that whole approach is somewhat sleezy. Please don't be offended! I understand your ideas and have seen that approach used successfully many times. As a surfer though ... it just ticks me off and I ultimately leave the site after one or two clicks.

I like some meat with my potatoes and as a surfer, I prefer to get the whole entree served in one go ... if you get my drift. I don't mind ordering a salad first, then my entree, desert and possibly coffee separately, but I get really annoyed when I have to order each little bite and sip separately.

Unleash your trashiness.

LOL Webwork! A friend who accompanied me today slapped me when we were having lunch, because, as I flicked through the digital photos, I deleted one of a guy who had seen the camera and decided to drop his swimming trunks for my benefit! She said that was her favourite shot!

OK ... other sites in my industry include that sort of thing, but I just don't feel it has any place on a site which caters to family vacations! So OK ... call me a prude. Maybe one day I'll be able to relax but until then, those wanting to see booty shots will have to go to my competitor's sites! ;)

That being said, the idea of using the periphery info learned in my photo quest to write separate articles regarding ferrys, etc. is excellent and very useful to my clientelle.

1. want visitors to book mark the site
2. want visitors to recommend the site
3. want the site to be of real value which will bring
one and two
4. want the individual pages of the site to stand out
in the serps and garner genuine organic traffic.

Absolutely! If you add:

5. Supply leads which translate to sales ... then you have a complete list!

You guys are great. Thanks for taking the time to respond. You've all given me some great ideas!

Webwork




msg:382656
 2:31 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Liane, in case I didn't make myself perfectly clear the first time (in search of faint humor that's often the case with me) by 'release your trashiness' I meant 'try being a little less critical', not 'feature trouser dropping', although pictures of attractive women/men might not be an impediment to men/women agreeing to book a sailing vacation with their family.

Perfection is in the eye of the beholder and on the web there's a great many beholders. If your writing style was the be-all-and-end-all factor your competition would be dead in the water, not sailing along. I'm not saying you're not the best at what you write about or that you should sacrifice any particular standard, just that you might expand your audience by expanding your definition of what is good content for your site. (Maybe you could use a nome de plume for certain 'other articles' on your site.)

What I'm suggesting is that you write a few 'not quite your usual style/subject' pieces and try using a reality check other than your own eye. Have a friend read your experimental stuff for value.

You might try different writing styles, writing voices, writing POV, etc.

PhraSEOlogy




msg:382657
 2:36 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Just a personal opinion.

I have made a living out of Bretts original post - as many others probably have.

Even though, I have 200,000 page websites I never forget the sage advice that Brett shared.

Everyone starts somewhere, and then progresses.

<edited> typo </edited>

zulufox




msg:382658
 2:45 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

You mean Brett's 26 points?

Webwork




msg:382659
 2:53 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Liane - by way of example.

As a college freshman I was obliged to take an English class that required that I write - creatively - in a journal every day.

At first, I was formal, predictable and probably boring. The professor was formal, predictable and boring too. So, apparently were my peers - all very careful in their 'creative' writing: writing to please, writing to show their skill, etc.

By mid-terms everyone was also getting Cs for their efforts.

During the second half of the semester I decided to break the mould and the rules. The first subject I attacked, in my 'journal writing', was the daily journal as an exercise in creative writing. Next, I blasted my monotonous creative writing professor and so on. No holds barred writing. Plenty of creative. Sometimes waxing between prose and poetry. Plenty of metaphors and all that jazz. Never a dull moment. I figured I was working on an F, but I was going to really enjoy the road less travelled.

One person got an A in that class and, in great confidence, the professor admitted it was the only A he had awarded in several years.

What's the point? The professor longed for creativity, not demonstrations of writing skill.

Is your style unique? Will it be heard above the crowd? Is it likely that the way you tell a story or describe this or that will attract media attention or the eye/mind of someone who can plug you into other channels? Do you really enjoy yourself when writing or does it feel like a chore? Do you feel restrained, not yourself? (I get the impression you could describe your life as adventuresome.)

I'm certain you can write in a compelling or selling way about the pleasures of family sailing/cruising, but where does that leave you with your audience?

The number of pages you create is as much an expression of creativity as it is an expression of productivty. You might find your productivity increases as your creativity is unleashed.

Unleash your trashiness (and let your friends help determine what has value and what is detritis.) Maybe by being a little more Hemmingway, and less safe-fun-adventure salesperson, you might attract more leads in the end.

timchuma




msg:382660
 3:09 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

I don't add a new page every day, but when I do add new content to my website it is usually dozens of pages at a time. It is really easy to do this if you are adding photo galleries and they have one photo per page.

I also go through every page I add and make sure the page title matches up properly to what the photo is of (probably the most boring part if I am taking loads of photos.)

From what I have found, once you have enough quality content people will start to find you and you just need to keep moving in the right direction to get more people visiting your site.

Thanks.

PhraSEOlogy




msg:382661
 3:12 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

zulufox,

Absolutely! Its just as relevant today - if not more so.

Does that make sense?

conroy




msg:382662
 3:40 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

2.5 cents per word? Low-end editing costs a lot more than that, and editing comes cheaper than content creation. This has got to be either a) delusional, b) false, c) exploitation of someone's unfortunate circumstances, or d) done by writers whose first language is not the language they're writing in...

I find that rather offensive. I would never exploit someone. It's not like I am forcing anyone to do the work. Perhaps you don't know where to look? There are many people out there who love the work I give them. What if they can write 4 articles in an hour? $60/hour doesn't sound so bad. Believe it or not some people write extremely fast and have a natural knack for it. This 2-10 days per article stuff is for people who really don't know what they are doing, or are spending the whole time researching or doing something that isn't making them money.

What if they have a regular job and do some writing on the side?

Just because you can't get anyone to write for that price (have you even tried? I've explored dozens of ways to get articles written) doesn't mean that someone else can't.

Finally, yes it is true, I'm not making it up. Second, their English is fantastic. Articles for $5 from someone from India is common, but then you'll need to edit it...

clearvision




msg:382663
 3:41 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

If I may go back to the original post, it sounded like you were interested in how to create your travel website faster and more effectively, plus turn your search engine leads...into sales.:)

Please remain open minded as I contribute my 2 cents :)

First, you need to know your audience and the type of people finding your site. Remember, they may not all think like you. When you described what you liked to see in a site...remember that is you and your opinion...that may not necessarily be your visitors. I like a site that is quick to read and moves me along...others like sites with lengthy articles. Be creative, and be WILLING to change if you must to meet the needs of your visitors.

What are you trying to sell ( that really is the bottom line). If your site is beautiful and nothing sells, you are not accomplishing your purpose other than maybe a labor of love.

Search engines are not the only way to get a large volume of traffic. When I first started, I decided to share what I had with others for free traffic. What do you have to offer on your site that would be of interest to other sites?....quality content! Why not make your articles available to other travel industry sites. It is a win/win. They get free content, you get free publicity and visitors when they print a bio and link back to your site when publishing the article ( you also earn credibility). This has been a LIFESAVER in the backlink department! Top sites are looking for quality content because they do not want to take the time to write the articles, which you seem to love doing:) Allow it to work for you two fold.

I really liked the suggestion about delving into the entire process of where, what and when you took the pictures. If you mention specific places you visit within an article, contact those places and tell them you are featuring them on your site and if they would like to link back to the article. Again...free publicity and a friend.

Just some questions to ponder, " What really is the bottomline of your site and are you accomplishing it by doing what you are doing now?", "Are you willing to change if you must to meet the needs of your visitors"

Just my 2cents :)

notredamekid




msg:382664
 5:42 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

2.5 cents per word? Low-end editing costs a lot more than that, and editing comes cheaper than content creation. This has got to be either a) delusional, b) false, c) exploitation of someone's unfortunate circumstances, or d) done by writers whose first language is not the language they're writing in...

I'm getting it done for $9/500 word article. Yes, is is a writer from India. Yes, it needs editing. But it's probably better written & researched than what I would get from a lot of American college grads I know...

martinibuster




msg:382665
 6:34 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

But it's probably better written & researched than what I would get from a lot of American college grads I know...

Well, the English spoken in India is not the same as is spoken in the US or the UK (or Australia for that matter). This is not meant as a slight- every region has it's own way of speaking English. India has it's own the same way as the US has it's own.

Speaking from experience, a batch writer in India is not going to match talented college kids for style, wit, and accuracy.

The outsourced writing is good for the situation where quality takes a back seat towards attracting raw traffic. I would most definitely outsource for the $5 page on that kind of project.

That said, it is good to spend a couple days personally writing engaging articles. The other day I came across someone's hobby site and found it so good I bookmarked it. When was the last time you bookmarked a site for how good the writing was?

So in my mind, attention to the writing is the quality that can elevate a website into the realm of a useful resource, worthy of bookmarking.

[edited by: martinibuster at 7:02 am (utc) on July 19, 2004]

bedlam




msg:382666
 6:46 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

2.5 cents per word? Low-end editing costs a lot more than that, and editing comes cheaper than content creation. This has got to be either a) delusional, b) false, c) exploitation of someone's unfortunate circumstances, or d) done by writers whose first language is not the language they're writing in...

I find that rather offensive. I would never exploit someone. It's not like I am forcing anyone to do the work.

Well, I apologize for offending you, as that wasn't my intention.

All the same, if a writer was to write four 600 word articles in one hour, that would be one every 15 minutes. Even assuming a very fast typing speed of 90wpm, your hypothetical writer will spend almost 7 of those 15 minutes just typing. If your content is such that it requires any research, or your writers ever need to edit their own compositions, it's my opinion that it is rather unlikely that the writing can be of good quality.

But again, sorry to have upset you with my overly sarcastic (and supposedly humourous) way of making my point.

-B

wackybrit




msg:382667
 7:03 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

All depends on your definition of 'exploit' really. Nike doesn't think it's 'exploiting' the people who make shoes for 15 cents a day. After all, they'll take the money and make the shoes.

I don't really have a problem with it either, although what I have a problem with is the implication that a nickels-and-dimes writer is going to be anywhere near as good as a well-paid one. There might be the very rare occurance of that, but as a rule.. good writers get good rates.

[edited by: wackybrit at 7:05 am (utc) on July 19, 2004]

troels nybo nielsen




msg:382668
 7:03 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

Liane, it sounds as if on your travels and in your editing work and in your daily work you collect _lots_ of stuff that might be used for a blog. And you certainly have the writing skills to make that blog excellent. And just because you have used one tidbit of information along with other tidbits of information in a post in your blog it does not mean you cannot use it again in its proper context in a carefully written article. On the contrary: Using it again in another context means that you create linking opportunities for yourself.

superpower




msg:382669
 7:49 am on Jul 19, 2004 (gmt 0)

It's entirely possible to spend the day on location taking 100 high quality photos, optimize them, annotate them, run through a gallery to html program and post them in the *same day*. That just about doubles the pages on your site. In fact I do exactly this process when I'm on the road.

So unfortunately if you are working "10 to 12 hours a day (for several weeks) trying to produce a photo gallery" and only have 116 pages on your website then I'd say you are wasting your time. Each photo should be a page with a title/brief info. 100 photos = 100 pages.

In regards to your question about content value vs. keyword/traffic target value. Content value == keyword/traffic value. I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss zulufox's post--that was right on...just translate it to photos.

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