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AOL CertifiedEmail
Are you a Goodmail Accredited Provider?
pageoneresults




msg:375251
 3:06 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

This topic has been discussed previously but it appears that some things have changed since that original posting...

As of 2006-02-01, AOL has some very strict procedures in place to send email to @aol.com accounts.

You now have two options:

AOL Whitelist
[postmaster.aol.com...]

AOL uses SPF for maintaining the whitelist.
AOL will begin using SPF records to maintain our whitelist in the near future. It is best for all organizations on AOL's whitelist to begin listing and maintaining (up to date) their SPF records so AOL can maintain accurate and up-to-date whitelisting of that domain's IP addresses. We will provide additional information in conjunction with our whitelist information pages.

AOL CertifiedEmail Program (Goodmail Accreditation)
[postmaster.aol.com...]

If you want guaranteed delivery of your mail to @aol.com accounts, you will need to pay.

How Much Will It Cost?
The accreditation application processing fee is regularly $399.00. A special charter price of $199.00 will apply to all applications submitted by July 31, 2006. The accreditation application fee is non-refundable. Please review the Accreditation Criteria before beginning your application.

I'll assume that most businesses will pay the fee to appease those clients who insist on using an @aol.com email account. I know we're in the process of applying right now. ;)

 

MaxMaxMax




msg:375252
 5:53 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Just for the record, the Goodmail programme will also require a "small" fee for every message you send. So company's won't just pay a one-off fee.

NickCoons




msg:375253
 6:06 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

<I'll assume that most businesses will pay the fee to appease those clients who insist on using an @aol.com email account.>

We certainly won't. Most people that I talk to that use AOL, when I ask for their email address, put their head down in shame. Those people only maintain their AOL account because their email address is printed on their business cards, letterhead, etc (which is a really bad idea to begin with).

Perhaps this will be the push they need to finally make a clean break.

pageoneresults




msg:375254
 6:18 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

MaxMaxMax...

Just for the record, the Goodmail programme will also require a "small" fee for every message you send.

Would you happen to know what those fees are? I'll assume they will be based on volume? There is no pricing information on the site other than the initial accreditation fee. I'm halfway through the application process which is fairly extensive. It's nice that they give you the option to finish later.

This isn't only AOL.

AOL and Yahoo!, the leading global providers of email services, are the first to join Goodmail's network of CertifiedEmail providers. With a reliable method of identifying "good" mail, they will eliminate the uncertainties associated with email delivery and message safety.

cerebrum




msg:375255
 6:22 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Its time for AOL users to switch over to gmail.

pageoneresults




msg:375256
 6:23 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Yahoo! CertifiedMail

[antispam.yahoo.com...]

The Truth about Certified Mail and Yahoo! Mail
If you've seen some of the recent media and blog headlines about the introduction of "Email Postage Fees from Yahoo! and AOL," you may be more than a bit confused. Frankly, there is a ton of misinformation out there, and we'd like to help clear it up. Here is some background on what Yahoo! is planning and why.

sandyk20




msg:375257
 6:23 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Example: If any user registers on webmasterworld.com using @aol.com account, if webmasterworld.com sends some periodic newsletters to this registered users, will this newsletter email ever reach this @aol.com user?

(I am not sure if @aol.com accounts are allowed on webmasterworld.com but mentioned above as an example)

pageoneresults




msg:375258
 6:30 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

If webmasterworld.com sends some periodic newsletters to this registered users, will this newsletter email ever reach this @aol.com user?

Based on what I've read so far, no. WebmasterWorld will need to request to be Whitelisted and send at least 100 emails per month to @aol.com users to remain on the Whitelist.

Or, WebmasterWorld may choose to utilize the Goodmail Accreditation program.

Yahoo!'s program is a bit different...

In the coming months, we will focus the certified mail program on "transactional" email messages such as bank statements and purchase receipts and, as announced in this release, we are partnering with Goodmail Systems to do so. Identity theft scams (or "phishing" attacks) frequently mimic these types of messages. By highlighting the legitimate transactional messages, we think our users will have a better chance to avoid these scams.

P.S. Here's the original Press Release. How did we miss this? Or did we?

Goodmail Systems Announces Plans to Launch CertifiedEmail Service for AOL and Yahoo! Customers
[goodmailsystems.com...]

carguy84




msg:375259
 6:48 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

AOL is a F*(*( joke of a company. First you have to apply to be on a whitelist. Then you're required to send a minimum amount of emails? What gives?

For the last 6 months, anytime I try to email an AOL user(and I'm not a spammer and have never sent out any unsolicited email) it gets bounced back. Even when I try to email my dad at his AOL address.

Now I don't allow any AOL.com email addresses during registration. I supply those users with a link to gmail and reasons why to switch.

Chip-

lexipixel




msg:375260
 7:44 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Ok.. let me get this straight;

1. Someone invents email.

2. Someone figures out how to send spoofed, phishing, bulk-unsolicited sales messages, and other annoying forms of spam.

3. Nobody figures out how to handle spam.

4. Someone figures out how to maintain "whitelists" and "blacklists", (of specific email addresses, domains, servers, and IP addresses).

5. Someone figures out that by putting everyone on the blacklist, then charging to be on the whitelist, they can in effect charge "email postage"..

This may be a big push for IM in business.

Example:

MyBigSpamHaus: Hi, mind if I tell you about some good deals on computer hardware?
YouOnIM: No thanks.
MyBigSpamHaus: Ok, have a nice day.

...it could happen

MaxMaxMax




msg:375261
 7:54 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Would you happen to know what those fees are?

Numbers I've seen suggest around $2.50 for a thousand emails, but I think it varies according to when you sign-up etc.

So don't take my word for it...

amznVibe




msg:375262
 7:59 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

So considering the sheer number of message groups on yahoo that will now be blocked by AOL - that means many AOL members will be fustrated in not getting message lists and finally look at making a yahoo or gmail account. Then they can quit AOL even easier once they realize they don't need aol for email anymore.

Sheesh, talk about a company shooting itself in the foot.
AOL member retention is in for a heck of an overload by the end of this year.

ritch_b




msg:375263
 8:03 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Like NickCoons, we certainly won't be signing up for this; partly because I seen no reason as to why we should have to pay to essentially guarantee delivery of messages to a group of addresses, whilst still being expected to handle incoming mails from the same block of addresses.

The other reason? We're based in the UK; GoodMail state that applicants must be based in either the US or Canada. Now that's a market limiter, if ever I saw one.

R.

glitterball




msg:375264
 9:53 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

We won't be signing up to this either.

After months of problems sending mail to AOL customers (Customers rarely receive our emails), we now ask all new customers to supply a more reliable email address than an AOL address.

zomega42




msg:375265
 2:05 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

To anyone who has tried blocking aol email addresses from signing up -- what kind of response have you gotten? How about blocking yahoo addresses?

I'm considering doing this on a commercial site, a few hundred daily signups. My visitors are not tech-savvy at all, I assume that makes it worse.

pageoneresults




msg:375266
 2:42 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Signed up for Goodmail last night. Made it half way through the application process and saved the rest for later. I didn't have all the information available that was required.

This was part of a welcome email that I received which gives a little more information that I couldn't find on the Goodmail site. Not immediately anyway. ;)

Goodmail Systems is currently running a Charter program for CertifiedEmail and is open for limited enrollment for highly qualified senders. Token costs for the Charter program period are free for a period of three to six months depending how early a sender is accredited and signes. After the free token period expires you can take advantage of token rates as low as $.0025 (to partner inbox providers).

As a side note, there has been some confusion about the need for small and medium sized senders to adopt CertifiedEmail immediately. There will be no degradation in the privileges received by these senders today that will require the immediate adoption of CertifiedEmail to retain those benefits. We anticipate the CertifiedEmail program to be available for broad commercial availability for senders of all sizes in late 2006 or early 2007. We would suggest that senders interested in the benefits above go through the following steps.

pageoneresults




msg:375267
 3:05 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

I'm considering doing this on a commercial site, a few hundred daily signups. My visitors are not tech-savvy at all, I assume that makes it worse.

During my hours of research yesterday into all of this, I found an alarming number of web hosting providers who have discontinued email forwarding to @aol.com email accounts. Many made this change in 2006 February when this was first announced. Most of the topics I read were from the month of February and there were quite a few "not so happy" providers and clients.

PaulPA




msg:375268
 3:29 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

So what exactly happens if a site uses email verification in order to activate new accounts? Anyone signing up with an AOL email account will not receive the info unless your site is certified?

pageoneresults




msg:375269
 3:39 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

So what exactly happens if a site uses email verification in order to activate new accounts?

You're going to have to meet the guidelines above to get those email verifications through to the recipients.

Anyone signing up with an AOL email account will not receive the info unless your site is certified?

Not exactly. You can opt for the Whitelist option. You'll have to have SPF in place to be on the Whitelist.

If you are using a third party provider for email services, subscriptions, etc., it will be up to them to take care of all of this. And, up to you to make sure they are. ;)

PaulPA




msg:375270
 3:43 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Talking about a site registration feature that once a user signs up for a service, the site will ask for confirmation of the user by sending a verification link to their email address.

whoisgregg




msg:375271
 3:51 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

An organization's mail servers must send a minimum of 100 emails per month to maintain whitelist status.

So I am going to have to setup a cron job to send 4 emails per day to my AOL account for the 4 or 5 times a month we have a customer who only has AOL mail?

It's backwards to me... if you send less than 100 emails a month, they shouldn't require any hoops to be jumped through.

pageoneresults




msg:375272
 3:56 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

They shouldn't require any hoops to be jumped through.

I'll agree. If you've proved yourself to be a Trusted Email provider, there should be no minimums as long as you maintain an up to date SPF record per their recommendations.

bedlam




msg:375273
 4:02 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Name 'goodmail' doubleplus goodthinkful use newspeak. Program concept doubleplus ridiculous. Unproceed implementationwise antethinkful planning.

Who comes up with the names for these things?

Harry




msg:375274
 4:05 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Can I get AOL credits for every AOL cd I've received in my lifetime? I like the sound of that already!

pageoneresults




msg:375275
 4:24 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

One of the first things you'll need to do before applying for CertifiedMail or being on the AOL Whitelist is to run a DNS Report on your mail server(s) [dnsreport.com]. You will most likely have some warnings that will need to be addressed prior to being approved for the Whitelist and/or CertifiedMail. One of those of course being an SPF Record.

Can I get AOL credits for every AOL cd I've received in my lifetime?

No.

wackybrit




msg:375276
 7:07 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Finally an excuse for me to disallow anyone to sign up to any of my sites with an aol.com address. Hotmail was going to join the club once, but they seem a lot better now. :)

Next I need to find a way to send automatic bounces back to people trying to send mail to aol.com address via my servers telling them that AOL has, effectively, decided to disconnect its e-mail system from the rest of the Internet and if they want to send mail to AOL, to switch their SMTP servers back to their ISP's!

pageoneresults




msg:375277
 7:15 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

Next I need to find a way to send automatic bounces back to people trying to send mail to aol.com address via my servers telling them that AOL has, effectively, decided to disconnect its e-mail system from the rest of the Internet and if they want to send mail to AOL, to switch their SMTP servers back to their ISP's!

Wait! Before you do that, take a look at all the other ISPs that are now moving into this type of environment. The numbers are staggering the more and more I read. This is not just AOL, this is all major ISPs or any ESPs (Email Service Providers).

wackybrit




msg:375278
 7:25 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

I (and few other small-time providers) is about to pay extortion fees to all and sundry. SPF is a great idea, but it appears there are certain levels and expectations attached to it (at least with AOL).

In any case, it seems like a great idea to encourage everyone to use their dialup / broadband provider's SMTP servers for outgoing mail, as those companies are likely to be able to keep the lines of communication open.

Ultimately, though, with all the firewalling, IP blocking, spam, and nonsense that's going on nowadays, I think small providers are just going to give up. I probably will, as it's only a value added service for customers.. and it'd be just as cheap to throw them all on some large shared host and still have a markup :)

pageoneresults




msg:375279
 7:27 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

MaxMaxMax provided additional Trusted Mail programs in another topic related to this.

EOC - Email Optimization Consultant
[webmasterworld.com...]

From those references provided by MaxMaxMax, here are some of the numbers they are stating...

Habeas for Senders

Get your mail delivered to the inbox, not the spam folder. Over 60,000 email gateways at ISPs and businesses worldwide recognize and process Habeas email every day.

Bonded Sender Program

The Bonded Sender™ Program ensures that messages from Bonded Senders get delivered to Hotmail, MSN, RoadRunner, and over 34,000 ISPs, corporations and universities (representing over 240 million mailboxes).

If you want to ensure that your email makes it to the recipients inbox, you'll look into the above Trusted Mail programs. Email is now going to be granular. If you are not part of a Trusted Email network, your email may not make it to those recipients inboxes. The above are alternative solutions to ensure the delivery of your email.

NickCoons




msg:375280
 9:58 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

<Can I get AOL credits for every AOL cd I've received in my lifetime?>

That's an interesting thought. How hypocrytical of AOL, once one of the largest offline "spammers" sending their discs to everyone, to implement any type of spam-prevention system.

This 44 message thread spans 2 pages: 44 ( [1] 2 > >
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