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AOL CertifiedEmail
Are you a Goodmail Accredited Provider?
pageoneresults




msg:375251
 3:06 am on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

This topic has been discussed previously but it appears that some things have changed since that original posting...

As of 2006-02-01, AOL has some very strict procedures in place to send email to @aol.com accounts.

You now have two options:

AOL Whitelist
[postmaster.aol.com...]

AOL uses SPF for maintaining the whitelist.
AOL will begin using SPF records to maintain our whitelist in the near future. It is best for all organizations on AOL's whitelist to begin listing and maintaining (up to date) their SPF records so AOL can maintain accurate and up-to-date whitelisting of that domain's IP addresses. We will provide additional information in conjunction with our whitelist information pages.

AOL CertifiedEmail Program (Goodmail Accreditation)
[postmaster.aol.com...]

If you want guaranteed delivery of your mail to @aol.com accounts, you will need to pay.

How Much Will It Cost?
The accreditation application processing fee is regularly $399.00. A special charter price of $199.00 will apply to all applications submitted by July 31, 2006. The accreditation application fee is non-refundable. Please review the Accreditation Criteria before beginning your application.

I'll assume that most businesses will pay the fee to appease those clients who insist on using an @aol.com email account. I know we're in the process of applying right now. ;)

 

pageoneresults




msg:375281
 10:16 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

That's an interesting thought. How hypocrytical of AOL, once one of the largest offline "spammers" sending their discs to everyone, to implement any type of spam-prevention system.

I know it's real easy to sit here and hate AOL for what they are doing. But, I must point out again that this just doesn't apply to AOL. I will admit that AOL has implemented some additional features to make it more difficult but they are in damage control mode right now and need to provide a safe environment for their users. The same will apply to anyone who provides email services.

Once this really gets into the mainstream press, clients are going to be looking for providers who offer a Trusted Email network. If you've decided that you don't need to be part of that network, then be prepared to miss out on a very important part of email marketing.

coopster




msg:375282
 10:26 pm on Apr 7, 2006 (gmt 0)

I didn't realize there was a similar thread running here too ( [webmasterworld.com...] ).


You now have two options

Actually, that has been out there for awhile, it's not new. You can find a reference to it in the Sender Policy Framework (SPF) [webmasterworld.com] thread dated back in 2004. I see you noted the accreditation model here as well. (more discussion on that here [webmasterworld.com...] Perhaps the official adaptation of the model is what they reference in the Feb 2006 release report.

Now you can see why I've been on a soapbox every once in awhile regarding SPF. By the way, those rates are quite inexpensive once you have a look at some of the other accreditation services out there.

lexipixel




msg:375283
 1:20 am on Apr 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

...after reading the heavy postings on GoodMail, Certified Email, and the like, I got an interesting postcard in the mail today: VERIZON INTERNET SERVICE IS SETTLING IN A CLASS ACTION FOR NOT DELIVERING EMAIL

"..a proposed settlement has been reached in two class action proceedings alleging that, beginning in October 2004, Verizon blicked legitimate incoming emails to certain Verizon.net subscribers..."

The card then directs (myself and others who got the card) to contact them... Aside from the usual phone, and postal mail addresses, there is a website at:

[EmailBlockingSettlement.com...]

If I read it right, settlement is for $3.50/mo per agrieved subscriber, up to $28 max...

percentages




msg:375284
 4:21 am on Apr 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

>I'll assume that most businesses will pay the fee to appease those clients who insist on using an @aol.com email account.

You "assume"? Here is my stance......do business with AOL or do business with me.....choose! If you choose AOL then I'm glad to see the back of you!

I refuse to do business with anyone that only has an AOL email account. It is simply too much trouble!

I'd rather throw business away than deal with AOL lovers. Come to me and offer an AOL only account and the relationship will be very short!

I don't need AOL users, AOL users need me! If they won't change now, they will change in the next few years.

I've wasted hundreds of historic hours jumping through AOL hoops, for the last 12 months I've simply told clients to switch, if they refuse they should look elsewhere!

zomega42




msg:375285
 7:34 pm on Apr 8, 2006 (gmt 0)

Percentages, what is your client base like? Tech-savvy, young, old, rich, poor?

I'd love to take the same stance but I'm afraid I'll scare away too many people. I have a lot of dial-up users, and a lot of rural users who don't even have a highspeed option available.

percentages




msg:375286
 8:27 am on Apr 10, 2006 (gmt 0)

>Percentages, what is your client base like? Tech-savvy, young, old, rich, poor?

My youngest AOL client is/was 18, my oldest, who is still a partial AOL client is 89!

The old gal at 89 would have to be considered wealthy (10+ million net worth), keeps AOL for historic reasons, has moved to better ISPs on the advice of many people.

All of my client base make a lot of money, some continue with AOL because for $25 a month they really don't care! One lead from that source from adveristising many years ago pays for AOL service today.

It is a business model many of us should consider!

ispy




msg:375287
 9:15 am on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)

I usually tell the customers about AOL's email problems when I ask for an email address. They dont know whats going on. A light bulb goes off and they discover that they are not really internet retards afterall and all those people who kept saying they sent so and so were not crazy, its just AOL's spam filter.

rise2it




msg:375288
 10:45 am on Apr 11, 2006 (gmt 0)


I would go out of business before I would submit any of my companies to AOL extortion...

johnlew




msg:375289
 10:49 pm on Apr 12, 2006 (gmt 0)

Taking a hardline stand against any company without regard to your users is absurd. AOL is retarted for tech savy individuals, but what you (and often I) fail to recognize is we actually spend a very large amount of time working on technology (that your 4 pages into this thread is more than enough proof), and that has a lot to do with why we know the difference. Chances are you would sit around looking pretty dumbfounded if someone handed you some seedling and told you to do whatever was needed to make it grow. Your going to kick a botanist off of your site/business b/c she dosent know better? Aol is easy and non intimidating, so for him/her has a lot of value, useless and irritating as it is to us.

Second, you are going to loose this, and loose hard, and thats a bad thing for people like us. If your running a two bit website, fine, but any notable business is going to kick the IT guy to the curb, so your going to be a minority.

That said, AOL has no right to charge anyone to email its members, and using market muscle to force little guys to pay money is actionable (we can sue).

[edited by: Woz at 11:11 pm (utc) on April 12, 2006]
[edit reason] see TOS. [/edit]

elklabone




msg:375290
 3:18 am on Apr 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

About 12% of our clients use AOL. I'm not going to try to convince all of these people to change email, I'll gladly make some changes to my emails and get certified to prove I'm a legit business and get my messages delivered.

When you tell them it's aol's fault you can't deliver your emails to them, it makes you sound like a fool. Granted, you may be right, but I'm guessing a lot of clients will think you're full of hot air when you try to explain to them that you and your PR5 website know more about email than AOL.

Rather go out of business? Really? I make my living on the Internet... full-time work from home webmaster. I'd rather pay the $299 and get on with business.

Now, is there ONE certified solution that will guarantee delivery of my emails to AOL, Yahoo, and Hotmail?

pageoneresults




msg:375291
 3:32 am on Apr 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

Now, is there ONE certified solution that will guarantee delivery of my emails to AOL, Yahoo, and Hotmail?

It appears that Habeas may fit the bill but may be a bit pricey. Unfortunately it appears they do not publish their pricing. I put together a general pricing comparison in this topic...

EOC - Email Optimization Consultant
[webmasterworld.com...]

Get your mail delivered to the inbox, not the spam folder. Over 60,000 email gateways at ISPs and businesses worldwide recognize and process Habeas email every day. Habeas will work on your behalf with all major ISPs, such as AOL, Yahoo and MSN/Hotmail, to get your email delivered today.

I'm not going to try to convince all of these people to change email, I'll gladly make some changes to my emails and get certified to prove I'm a legit business and get my messages delivered.

Personally I feel that is a very smart move on your part. Trusted Email will be the next wave until someone figures out a better way to handle email outside of the current protocol.

WestBrowse




msg:375292
 6:14 am on Apr 21, 2006 (gmt 0)

<I'll assume that most businesses will pay the fee to appease those clients who insist on using an @aol.com email account.>
I will not.
But how can I get an @aol.com email account?
Somebody?

elklabone




msg:375293
 9:26 pm on Apr 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

But how can I get an @aol.com email account?
Somebody?

My business partner wanted an aol address to experiment with a few months ago. I belive AOL has a "bring your own connection" package that you can sign up for... this means you don't use them to connect to the internet, but you can still use all of the aol features, including email.

To my knowledge, the only way to do this is to sign up, although I think you do get your first month for free.

This used to be called AOL BYOA (Bring your own Access). I don't know if it's still around or not...

wmuser




msg:375294
 9:39 pm on Apr 22, 2006 (gmt 0)

Its really doesnt make sense,why not maintaine SPF record which will make you get into white list of all providers(potentialy) than paying $300 to get into AOl list alone?

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