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U.S. Judge Rules Apple Conspired to Raise e-book Prices
engine




msg:4591815
 2:08 pm on Jul 10, 2013 (gmt 0)

In a decision that could reshape how books are sold on the Internet, a federal judge ruled that Apple Inc (AAPL.O) conspired to raise the retail prices of e-books in violation of antitrust law, and called for a trial on damages.

The decision by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan is a victory for the U.S. government and various states, which the judge said are entitled to injunctive relief.U.S. Judge Rules Apple Conspired to Raise e-book Prices [reuters.com]
Cote said the conspiracy resulted in prices for some e-books rising to $12.99 or $14.99, when Amazon had sold for $9.99.

"The plaintiffs have shown that the publisher defendants conspired with each other to eliminate retail price competition in order to raise e-book prices, and that Apple played a central role in facilitating and executing that conspiracy," Cote said.

 

Kendo




msg:4591820
 2:31 pm on Jul 10, 2013 (gmt 0)

That's interesting because I have developed a couple of online book stores and a common gripe amongst authors is that other sites discourage authors from selling books for more than a few dollars by reducing their return, ie: paying the author less if the book price is higher.

Authors need to have control over what their book sells for and not those book sellers who are more interested in volume sales than the authors' livelihood.

So I have a huge problem understanding what the problem is with this story line because it's not up to anyone but the author and/or the book vendor what a book sells for!

So what if authors have a better chance to recoup a living from their efforts. Or are the complainants in this case those who don't give a damn as long as they something for almost nothing?

What would they say about some of our authors charging up to $300 and more for their books?

piatkow




msg:4591899
 5:49 pm on Jul 10, 2013 (gmt 0)


Or are the complainants in this case those who don't give a damn as long as they something for almost nothing?

Anything that protects producer income is classed as price fixing. Clearly all authors make as much as JK Rowling and the public need to be protected.

lucy24




msg:4591962
 8:40 pm on Jul 10, 2013 (gmt 0)

prices for some e-books rising to $12.99 or $14.99, when Amazon had sold for $9.99

This is the same amazon that charges up to $3.99 for public-domain books that are available free from other sources?

graeme_p




msg:4592076
 8:24 am on Jul 11, 2013 (gmt 0)

The publishers and Apple were price fixing. Publishers were colluding to fix prices.

Everyone hates competition/anti-trust laws when it applies to them, but a capitalist economy cannot function without them.

@lucy24, yes, Amazon is very clever at extracting money from Kindle users - as well as becoming a rather nasty near monopoly on book distribution.

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