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Felix Baumgartner free fall 39Km.does it in style :)
As a some time skydiver - congratulations Felix :))
Leosghost




msg:4508042
 11:32 pm on Oct 14, 2012 (gmt 0)

Austrian Felix Baumgartner has become the first skydiver to go faster than the speed of sound, reaching a top speed of 833.9mph (1,342km/h).


[bbc.co.uk...]

Amazing feat..and superb recovery to delta..glass raised :)

 

SevenCubed




msg:4508717
 2:22 am on Oct 17, 2012 (gmt 0)

1) When a jet breaks the sound barrier they can break windows if they are at low altitude, how did he not break his ear drums?

2) Can the fear-factor also break the sound barrier relentlessly chasing him all the way down?

3) Considering the standard lapse rate of 2ºC per 305 metres it must have been a tad bit chilly up there but there's no mention of him wearing battery operated wooly socks to keep his toes warm.

4) Speaking of toes...I'll bet his heart was in his throat as the capsule evicted him and he began to tumble out of control at which point his heart was then in his toes and then his head then his toes again and head...

@ Leosghost -- your title implies you have jumped out of perfectly good planes that still had the engine running and fuel in its tanks. Would you attempt what he did if you were given the opportunity? Or even anyone else reading this?

Leosghost




msg:4508735
 3:35 am on Oct 17, 2012 (gmt 0)

1) When a jet breaks the sound barrier they can break windows if they are at low altitude, how did he not break his ear drums?

They don't break their own windows ( cockpit and cabin glass though ), do they : ?..it is about where one is relative to the air/sound pressure..but I would imagine that he was "shaken", his medical "work up" must be very interesting, as he came down in "delta", his helmet and thus neck and upper back would have been taking the buffeting..( would like a close look at the helmet and suit ), to see what padding and rigidity "extras" were included..

2) Can the fear-factor also break the sound barrier relentlessly chasing him all the way down?

Once you are committed to a jump ( have left the plane )..there is no fear :) The first jump, one is afraid..then there is elation :) and landing, and if the landing is good, there is the immediate desire to do it again..YMMV

3) Considering the standard lapse rate of 2ºC per 305 metres it must have been a tad bit chilly up there but there's no mention of him wearing battery operated wooly socks to keep his toes warm.

His helmet "fogged"..so there was a temperature difference when he opened the capsule door..but I don't suppose he was thinking about his feet..the most important thing would be not to tumble and/spin..( and if he did to be able to correct that ..which he did amazingly well :) and not to fall asleep from the cold on the way down ( even with the adrenalin rush, the sheer cold could have made him sleepy, which is why, if I followed the reports correctly, the chute was rigged to open automatically, and not by a pull on the D ring..

Would you attempt what he did if you were given the opportunity?

Were I still his age ..yes :)

your title implies you have jumped out of perfectly good planes that still had the engine running and fuel in its tanks.

Indeed..many times..but not nearly as many as Felix Baumgartner..

Btw ..long time ago here, DaveAtIFG, who has been gone now over 6 years :( asked me why some of us do that.." ( "Why does anyone jump out of perfectly good planes that still have the engine running and fuel in their tanks" ). too* ..( there was "that question", implicit in your question ;)..the answer is the same ..

There is no rush like free-fall :))

And in free fall ..one gets the closest that one can to flying..the wingsuit [en.wikipedia.org...] brings that even closer..but even without one, small movements when falling, before deploying the chute, allow one to "track" across the sky, and indulge in acrobatics whilst falling..

Every kid dreams they can fly..Skydivers do it..:)

*In my case..a family thing , my father was ( amongst other things ) a senior military parachute instructor and a competition skydiver ( those elaborate formations with large numbers of skydivers ) ..got me into it..and flying ( where one stays in the aircraft, all the way from take off to landing ;)..and gliders and such..

** Beginners, both civilian and military make their first jumps with "static line"..their chute's opening system is attached to whatever they are jumping from, and is thus opened for them in case they "freeze" with fear..military paratroopers are on "static lines" ..when they are "deployed" ..their parachutes re not the same as those used in Skydiving..
[en.wikipedia.org...]

SevenCubed




msg:4508750
 4:45 am on Oct 17, 2012 (gmt 0)

They don't break their own windows ( cockpit and cabin glass though ), do they : ?..it is about where one is relative to the air/sound pressure..


Ya I knowd dat ;)

Once you are committed to a jump ( have left the plane )..there is no fear :) The first jump, one is afraid..then there is elation :) and landing, and if the landing is good, there is the immediate desire to do it again..YMMV


I'll have to take your word for it :) A few times I considered trying it but never did get around to it. The closest I ever came was when a plane I was flying had an engine failure. If I had a parachute I probably would have jumped but I didn't so I was a prisoner. Yes I was elated to land safely but as I remember there was no immediate desire to do it again! Yes my YMMV was very different :)

..the most important thing would be not to tumble and/spin..


That takes all the fun out of it no? When I was training for my PPL my instructor was also a certified aerobatic instructor and he used to demonstrate a few unusual attitudes -- because of my hootin' and hollerin' he probably sensed I was enjoying it. It was invaluable lessons that helped me gain confidence for when I had to recover from spins during my flight exam. We were put under a hood, the chief flight instructor who was giving the exam then put the plane in an out-of-control attitude then bark at us to flip the hood up and take control to recover into "delta" -- ohhhh the joy! I'm giggling right now remembering it, my heart was in my toes and if anything wasn't secured it would have been on the ceiling, then the floor, then the ceiling, then the back seat...

Certainly congrats to Felix, it was another giant leap for mankind. I read he now wants to fly rescue helicopters, cool!

creeking




msg:4508823
 9:55 am on Oct 17, 2012 (gmt 0)

:)

[i.imgur.com...]

Leosghost




msg:4508832
 10:26 am on Oct 17, 2012 (gmt 0)

Love it :))

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