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Anybody encounter gas rage yet?
Some peoples are getting angry
skibum




msg:3649415
 4:54 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

So I pulled into the gas station to fill up, the cheapest one around. All of a sudden there is someone yelling and screaming in the other line of pumps. Thought maybe someone was getting held up or something. Looked over and didn't see any big commotion over there.

Just one guy yelling F___ the US goverment, spewing conspiracy stuff, ranting about the politicians and oil companies and the middle east. He was by himself just going off, not even yelling at anyone, just venting. Hate to see what happens when it hits 7 or 10 bucks a gallon around here.

So now it looks like we'll have gas rage and road rage. Anybody else encounter any gas ragers yet?

 

Swanny007




msg:3649428
 5:07 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Yikes. I don't see much because I just bought a Prius, I've only filled up once so far LOL.

My policy is if you don't like gas prices, then do something about it. I did, I bought a Prius. Maybe that guy needs to ride his bicycle, carpool, buy an electric car, motorcycle, take the bus, etc. There are lots of options besides bitching.

adb64




msg:3649449
 6:07 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Well here in the Netherlands we already pay that amount for gas. Currently it is about 1.55 Euro / litre and assuming 1 euro is 1.5 dollar we here pay 1.55 * 1.5 * 3.785 = 8.8 dollar / gallon.

jecasc




msg:3649619
 11:27 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Actually - when I see all the people every morning, each alone in the car, moving around one or two tons of plastic and metal to transport 80 kilos of human from A to B - I keep wondering if gas isn't still much too cheap...

pageoneresults




msg:3649630
 11:36 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Anybody else encounter any gas ragers yet?

I sure hope not! Here in California we have enough of the Road Rage, we can't afford other Ragers on the Road!

Just filled up the other day which I only do about twice a month due to limited mileage on that automobile. $4.09 USD per gallon. That's the highest I've seen it yet. I was talking to one of the Mom's at my daughter's dance and she drives a Ford Excursion.

Me: "So, how much to fill that thing up?"

Her: "This time around? About $165.00"

Me: "Yikes! What do you mean this time around?"

Her: "Oh, I fill up once or twice a week. The kids have a lot of activities. We're getting rid of it pronto!"

Big truck and auto sales have to be taking a total beating right now. I sure wouldn't want to be a big auto salesperson in this current economy climate.

Just imagine what those US Dollars we spend on the purchase of Oil/Fuel go to... :(

Habtom




msg:3649631
 11:50 am on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't even know how much I pay at the gas station. It is probably around 70 USD a month or so. Road rage is also very cheap :) it is easy to find at least 3 people to fill you up on the way to work.

Just imagine what those US Dollars we spend on the purchase of Oil/Fuel go to... :(

In case of Dubai, that helps build the Tallest tower in the world [burjdubai.com]. I am afraid that money might also be empowering a few bad neighbours around here too :(

[edited by: Habtom at 11:55 am (utc) on May 14, 2008]

aleksl




msg:3649656
 12:30 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Hate to see what happens when it hits 7 or 10 bucks a gallon around here.

and this is coming fast, you better believe it.

Ford and GM wouldn't be around anymore if not for them being Wall Street darlings and churning through your 401K and IRA dollars. I sure hope not a lot of people keep their pension hopes in stock, 'cause it ain't going to be pretty...and then you'll see a real gas rage.

engine




msg:3649693
 1:56 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

I can't say i've seen "gas rage", as you put it, although, quietly, in the UK, we've been suffering the pain of high oil prices at the pump for some time, so, perhaps we're through that phase.

htdawg




msg:3649704
 2:03 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Here in Greece the truck drivers that supply petrol & transport food ect.. have been on strike for over a week and almost all of the petrol stations have run out of gas. The stations that still had some petrol were like a war zone, people were fighting & waiting hours in lines for a few liters of gas.

Dabrowski




msg:3649710
 2:11 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Here in the UK we currently pay about £1.08 per litre = $1.94 * 3.785 = $7.34 gallon. That's for unleaded, diesel is more.

I work all over the country here, regularly fill my Mondeo more than once a week on super £1.13 litre, a £60 quid fillup easily.

Sorry adb64, it's nice to know somebody else has to pay more!

ronin




msg:3649770
 3:17 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

USA, wake up.
Stop living in a bubble.
You have really, really cheap petrol. You've always had it.
You're so spoilt, you don't even know it.

Rugles




msg:3649796
 3:37 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Just one guy yelling F___ the US goverment, spewing conspiracy stuff, ranting about the politicians and oil companies and the middle east. He was by himself just going off, not even yelling at anyone, just venting. Hate to see what happens when it hits 7 or 10 bucks a gallon around here.

Please tell me he was driving an SUV? And that he lives 40 miles from where he works?

The longer this lasts (and i predict its never going to be cheap again) the better our society will be. People will start driving smaller vehicles, there will be greater demand for the car companies to adjust, these are good things. Plus people will consider living closer to their work .. that is a real good thing. Bringing more wealth back to the cites.

StoutFiles




msg:3649804
 3:41 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Traffic is crowded as it is...hopefully the gas prices will fix that problem somewhat.

skibum




msg:3649810
 3:46 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

There was a pickup and an SUV over by him so it looked like he had a guzzler one way or the other. In the long term, I think it is a great thing since we'll be forced to switch to something other than monstrous SUVs, won't have to worry about becoming road kill to one of them if you drive something small and efficient, maybe won't have to sit in traffic all day, there will have to be a better public transportation infrastructure. Of course the economy and the markets will probably take a rather big hit in the mean time during the transition.

Rugles




msg:3649816
 3:52 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Like you Skibum, I see some upside to the new reality.

Maybe our governments will finally get serious about finding an alternative to burning oil for our transportation. It will give my asthma-ridden lungs a break.

LifeinAsia




msg:3649818
 3:57 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't see much because I just bought a Prius, I've only filled up once so far LOL.

I bike to work. Haven't filled up my car for close to a month...

thecoalman




msg:3649837
 4:25 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Maybe our governments will finally get serious about finding an alternative to burning oil for our transportation.

I don't see that happeneing in the forseeable future, there's a huge infrastructure built up over the last 100 years to support oil. The trucking and shipping industry is going to take many years to convert to anything simply because of the energy required to move large volumes of products. That's the single biggest hurdle for any alternative fuel. It will take decades to fully integrate any new fuel other than electric.

As far as electric it still needs to be produced and the demands on the grid would raise astronomically on an already taxed grid. What they should be concentrating on is electric cars and upgrading the electric grid and providing electricity as cheaply as possible.

Enter coal... my favorite subject. The U.S needs to develope clean coal technology first and foremost. The U.S. is sitting on top of more than 25% of the known world reserves. About equal to China and Russia combined. Enough to power itself well into the next century.

More nuclear power plants should be built too, in the meantime as green technology becomes viable they can slowly move to that. You can't do it overnight and if they try its a disaster waiting to happen.

[edited by: thecoalman at 4:28 pm (utc) on May 14, 2008]

Murdoch




msg:3649841
 4:27 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't think the proper methodology of assessing how much one pays for gas is to measure it against how much the US dollar is worth. A better way to do it is to measure it against the national average salary.

So if you pay almost £4 GBP a gallon for gas, then that's what you pay. You DO NOT pay $8 USD. Yes I do realize that the US still has the cheapest petrol prices, but let's use real numbers please. Just because overseas currency has eclipsed the US dollar does not mean you start making less money at work.

For the record I had to quit my job and get one closer to my house and I have a Honda Prelude that gets almost 30mpg, so I feel the pain.

martinibuster




msg:3649886
 4:46 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Stop living in a bubble.
You have really, really cheap petrol.

As a consequence of historically higher fuel prices Europeans tend to drive more fuel efficient autos so I suspect it evens out. It's not a bubble, our drivers hurt as much as yours, Americans just consume more to get to the same level of pain. :) I suspect Europeans are paying more or less the same per month as Americans.

Just imagine what those US Dollars we spend on the purchase of Oil/Fuel go to...

Right, there are geo-political consequences in the choice of vehicle we drive. And it's not just in the Middle East, it affects the American continent directly. A significant amount of gasoline comes from Venezuela, whose President Hugo Chavez is alleged to be clandestinely funding the Marxist FARC guerrillas (and their cocaine production) in Colombia.

pageoneresults




msg:3649925
 5:31 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't see that happeneing in the forseeable future, there's a huge infrastructure built up over the last 100 years to support oil.

Ah, but it is happening and many of us don't see it. I've changed my TV viewing habits and now watch NatGeo and the Discovery Channel when time permits. When I have my 8 year old daughter with me, that is all we watch. I am amazed at what has been happening around me and just wasn't aware of it. I need to get out more often!

Did you know that with the improvements in technology, scientists are now saying that the rate at which things are progressing is 50 times faster than what they thought previously. That's a pretty significant number if you ask me.

All the major auto manufacturers are working hard to make vehicles that are less dependent on oil but it is going to take a bit of time. Unfortunately technology did not allow us to take those steps back then. But, me thinks now is the right time and within the next two years, there will be major changes afoot, those that are visible to everyone, not just us who watch the shows that explain to us in detail what is happening.

I won't complain about the gas prices. I can't, gas is a necessity, just like having a roof over your head. For most that is. There's a new generation that is finding ways to minimize their use of oil and those are the future Movers and Shakers.

Gas Rage?

Hehehe, at $7.00+ per gallon, I might be a little enraged. ;)

martinibuster




msg:3649961
 5:59 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

>>>All the major auto manufacturers are working hard to make vehicles that are less dependent on oil but it is going to take a bit of time.

P1R, the U.S. government spent 1 Billion dollars between 1993 to 2000 to develop technologies to GIVE to the Big 3 Automakers, including technologies used in the military, in order to produce these vehicles. The vehicle prototypes were ready in 2000, but after the change in presidential administrations, the government and the auto industry ended the program, deciding to not introduce the vehicles. The hard work was done fifteen years ago and we even paid the tab. Yet the cars were never produced.

Full article is in The New Yorker [newyorker.com].

The logic is probably that the infrastructure investment for creating hybrid autos at a time when Americans were buying a lot of SUVs did not make financial sense. Not altogether unreasonable, although shortsighted as well.

pageoneresults




msg:3649969
 6:11 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Don't get me started! ;)

The future of the car didn’t lie with diesel hybrids or any other technology that would allow vehicles to get eighty miles to the gallon. “We can do better than that,” Abraham declared. The Administration and the automakers, he said, were undertaking a new, even more ambitious venture, called FreedomCAR. The goal of this project was to produce vehicles that would run on pure hydrogen.

Their vision was diesel, yuck! Who the heck wants to smell diesel fumes? Not I and definitely not the new administration, I think it was a smart move to scrap that project.

Diesel? Yeeeooowww, what a nasty product. I like to drive with my windows down. I drive a two seat sports car. Pulling up on the right side of a super duty turbo diesel pickup is like inhaling death! That damn 5 inch diesel exhaust is aimed right at my driver's side open window! And, if its still cold, as soon as he steps on it, I'm going to have a cabin filled with death!

[edited by: pageoneresults at 6:12 pm (utc) on May 14, 2008]

Rugles




msg:3649973
 6:17 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

And then there is that movie "Who killed the Electric Car" about the GM vehicle which people loved, yet GM would not sell, they only allowed leasing. When the leases were up, they took back all the cars, sometimes forcibly and crushed them. Turns out GM sold the technology to Exxon, who immediately shelved the technology.

It is really hard not to come to the conclusion there is a conspiracy to keep us on oil.

MatthewHSE




msg:3650145
 8:59 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

USA, wake up.
Stop living in a bubble.
You have really, really cheap petrol. You've always had it.
You're so spoilt, you don't even know it.

Our gas is far too expensive for the simple reason that it could be far cheaper. The problem is that the environmentalists have tied our hands so we can't produce our own gas. The U.S. has plenty of its own oil, in fact there are some new supplies of oil being created faster than we could use them. Unfortunately, we can't touch any of it, which leaves us at the mercy of whatever anybody else wants to charge.

Besides, I've heard folks from Europe gripe about how unfair it is that America has lower gas prices, but has it ever crossed their minds that we're a far larger country and we have to travel farther to get anywhere? Americans don't think anything of driving an hour to a good restaurant, and my family's vacation destinations are normally at least a 20-hour drive each way. I think Europeans simply have no idea whatsoever of just how big America really is and what that means for day-to-day living.

And I say it again - our gas is three times what it ought to be, because it could be one-third its current price if we could just do our own drilling.

buckworks




msg:3650159
 9:18 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

just do our own drilling.

I've heard that referred to as the "Drain America First" plan.

Rugles




msg:3650161
 9:20 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

That is the company line from oil companies. But the fact is, if the USA drills for every drop that they know about, it will not make one bit of difference at the pump. The price is set by the world markets and there is plenty of oil. How do I know this? Well, I live in Canada. We have more oil than Saudi Arabia and I am paying more than you. So having access to oil will not lower the price. That is exactly what the oil companies want you to believe. So go ahead, drill away, but you will still be paying $10.00 a gallon in a few years.

Besides, oil is not the only problem, refining is the problem. The oil companies have been mothballing refineries over the last 2 decades to choke off supply. I used to work as a tradesmen in some refineries up here 20 years ago, 2 out of the 4 refineries I worked at are now closed. How convenient?

davewray




msg:3650297
 11:05 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

Even here in Canada...where we have an "abundant" amount of oil in the Alberta Oilsands, gas is the equivalent of over $5/gallon...still 25% higher than the US...weird....and much lower than Europe...but we are getting there...

Lovejoy




msg:3650308
 11:31 pm on May 14, 2008 (gmt 0)

MatthewHSE, with all due respect, the average commute to work in the USA is only about 30 miles. Europe is quite large, and Europeans do travel great distances every year on vacations, it's 1,358 mi from London to Seville. The difference is that in Europe they have a well developed transit system. As far as restaurant go, driving just about anywhere in southern England takes an hour. The only reason Americans drive such distances is because gas is cheap.......

thecoalman




msg:3650348
 12:07 am on May 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Well, I live in Canada. We have more oil than Saudi Arabia and I am paying more than you.

That may very well be true however it's not "cheap oil". The oil you are talking about requires a lot of energy to be extracted. Instead of gusher that would be typical of a regular oil well it requires X amount of that oil to go back into producing more oil. The same is true for most of the worlds larger oil fields because they have been pumping oil out of them for decades. What was once oil wells under pressure are now being pupmed full of water, the oil has to be pumped and the prcessing requires more energy because of all the water in it which you just pumped down the hole...

A estimate by the DOE places worldwide peak oil production around 2037, worse case prediction is 2026, and long term prediction is 2057.

[eia.doe.gov...]

After this peak there will be a steep decline. These estimates are made by sparse data some of which is very out of date, the major oil producing countries like Saudi Arabia aren't talking so it's an unknown to some extent. The fact is though that all the major oil fields in the world like Ghawar in Saudi Arabia were discovered decades ago and have been pumping oil since. Ghawar is the worlds largest and supplies something like 7% of the worlds supply and has accounted for better than half of Saudi Arabia's output over the last half century. :o

Just to put the output of this field in perspective if you're in the U.S. you may remember the news report a year or two ago about the big find in the Gulf of Mexico. The estimates at the time of that find for that field would be depleted in about 4 months to 2 years if it matched the output of Ghawar.

This same report was partly based on previous work of Dr. M. King Hubbert who almost nailed the decline of Texas oil to the year in the early 70's something like 2 decades before it happened. His prediction for world peak was something like 2000 which has come and gone but he didn't have a lot of data available to him and new technologies and new oil finds have extended that.

So the question is "Do you feel lucky punk?" ;P

skibum




msg:3650360
 12:23 am on May 15, 2008 (gmt 0)

Our gas is far too expensive for the simple reason that it could be far cheaper. The problem is that the environmentalists have tied our hands so we can't produce our own gas. The U.S. has plenty of its own oil, in fact there are some new supplies of oil being created faster than we could use them. Unfortunately, we can't touch any of it, which leaves us at the mercy of whatever anybody else wants to charge.

If it was far cheaper, then we'd stay addicted to it and continue to consume it w/o regard to it being a limited resource. It would be nice to see the revenue from higher oil prices going to something paving the way for an alternative, not to sure if that is an oil company or not but my guess is no.

Regardless of which side of the environmental issue one sits on, it could turn out to be a very good strategic move to let the environmental concerns take priority over drilling for now at least. When the rest of the world is declining in production, the US will be sitting on some nice reserves.

This 59 message thread spans 2 pages: 59 ( [1] 2 > >
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