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Phrases and accents that drive you mad !
Essex_boy




msg:3641067
 6:09 pm on May 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

I live in England and work all over the country, now England is a strange place, its only small but has a very wide of peoples with diffrent oulooks and accents, varying often in rural parts, village to village.

The term Pegged it, in Essex means some one ran away, but the same term in Suffolk means some one died, so you can see theres plenty of space for confusion.

Now my main gripe, I dislike the Norfolk accent, in fact I hate.

They have a god awful phrase 'It craze me it do' which when translated means 'its driving me mad'.

I hate it but hear it frequently as im working Norfolk presently.

So what are your pet hates thens ?

 

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:3641079
 6:29 pm on May 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Gonnae gies a brek pal? Whit's wrang wae accents? We've a' goat them. :)

tbear




msg:3641091
 6:56 pm on May 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

solutions.........
Waste solutions
Internet solutions
Anything solutions
Totally meaningless solutions...........

King_Fisher




msg:3641102
 7:32 pm on May 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Who are you carrying to the dance? (US Southern)...KF

thecoalman




msg:3641197
 12:57 am on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

We have a peculiar non-word local to out area... "hainah", "heyna", or "ainah". There really is no correct spelling because it isn't a word. It means in most cases "isn't it the truth" or "I agree" or.....

Joe: "Good day to drink beer, heyna Tom"
Tom: "Heyna"

LOL

The origin is debated but in my opinion it comes from another non word "ain't" combined with it. "Ain't it". The pronunciation has evolved to the short version, the first part is usually pronounced like hay and the last part is a simple na "hay-na".

It's hard not to say it because its so ingrained, its even joked about locally. You often get weird looks from people not from the area when you utter this word... "#*$! did you just say?" .... :)

So if you're ever in Northeastern Pennsylvania and hear this uttered you'll know what it means.

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:3641318
 8:35 am on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Here in the west of Scotland, when relating events, many young and some not so young people punctuate every sentence with, "as li' a'" or "am li' a'" (glottal stops on li' and a'). It is an abbreviation for "I was like that" or "I am like that"..

Example
-------
"So I went up to the bar and Jim said, 'Do you want a beer?' As li' a', aye! So he got me a beer and as li' a', 'Ta!'

He says, 'Do you want sit down?' and am li' a' 'aye!'. We sat down and big John came in, 'he's li' a', 'how are you doin'? We're li' a', 'Alright big man'."

It sounds terrible, and some people cannot speak without using this. I dread to think what people from outside the area think of it?

digitalghost




msg:3641460
 3:17 pm on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

Fixin' to - Southern U.S. Means to get ready. As in, "I'm a fixin' to head out to the store". What it actually means is that the person is thinking about getting ready to do something and the 'fixin too' period may be 5 minutes, 5 days, 5 weeks, or they may have been fixin' to do something for the last 5 years.

Get Ill - Southern U.S. Means to get angry. As in, "I'm a fixin to get ill".

Jacked up - U.S. All over the place. Means messed up, FUBAR or broken. Not sure about the evolution of that one. Came into being about the time car-jackings became popular, but doesn't have the same meaning. But, if someone jacks yer car, that's jacked up.

Snap - Teenspeak I think it means that an insult was a particularly good one. As in, "Your momma's so fat, Krispy Kreme calls her to tell her the hot sign is on". And the rest of the crowd chimes in with "Snap!".

jdMorgan




msg:3641478
 4:02 pm on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

> "as li' a'" or "am li' a'". It is an abbreviation for "I was like that" or "I am like that".

The equivalent in U.S. teen-speak is "I'm like" -- meaning "I said."
"And the teacher said, 'where's your homework?' and I'm like, 'Oh, the dog ate it!' And she's like, 'Well, you can't pass this course if you don't turn it in by tomorrow.'"

That one drives me crazy simply because it is so over-used. Otherwise, I love these "regionalisms" and idioms. Rather than letting them bother me, I enjoy them for what they are: people declaring, "We're not all the same!"

Jim

rocknbil




msg:3641534
 6:04 pm on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't know why, but the prevalence of baby talk always gets me. In particular,

"My bad."

Speaking of accents, an old observation I stumbled across the other day (probably only Americans will appreciate the truth of this) . . . .

The quantity of consonants in (the American version of) the English language is constant. If omitted in one place, they turn up in another. When a Bostonian "pahks" his "cah," the lost r's migrate southwest, causing a Texan to "warsh" his car and
invest in "erl wells."

phranque




msg:3641584
 8:18 pm on May 4, 2008 (gmt 0)

this is us-centric, but i've noticed in the past few years that the boys tend to strongly and proudly use the local accent and idiom and the girls all sound like so cal tv characters

Crush




msg:3641913
 1:17 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

When a grey personality suit man has to do a TV interview and starts talking all formally.

I am currently....
So this means in effect....
to the tune of..
ostensibly...

zzzz I snooze off.

Crush




msg:3641914
 1:22 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

Oh and like... Americans...like speak with....like you know like wow!

All the US students girls in Prague at the tram stop do the above.

[edited by: Crush at 1:22 pm (utc) on May 5, 2008]

Marcia




msg:3641974
 2:51 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

Cuppa cawfee. Doesn't bother me at all, that's how I still say it. Still, after awl this time.

lawman




msg:3641978
 2:55 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

I'm just sayin'

adamnichols45




msg:3641989
 3:06 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

Essex boy - Im from Essex to and the term pegged it means that some one has died. Always has done.

Marcia




msg:3641990
 3:07 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

I would think pegged meant nailed.

vincevincevince




msg:3641991
 3:09 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

So what are your pet hates thens ?

In the UK... Essex accents. Nothing personal! Closely followed by Surrey. In Malaysia, the 'accents' I most hate are local people who try to speak in what they feel sure is an American or British accent.

[edited by: vincevincevince at 3:12 pm (utc) on May 5, 2008]

Marcia




msg:3641995
 3:11 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

>Essex accents. Nothing personal! Closely followed by Surrey.

Not scousers?

ken_b




msg:3642002
 3:21 pm on May 5, 2008 (gmt 0)

Do hates make good pets?

For that matter, what's a hate?

I've always thought the term "pegged it" meant you got something exactly right.

Jane_Doe




msg:3642517
 4:49 am on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

When a husband or wife says "we're pregnant". That is like nails on a chalkboard to me.

willybfriendly




msg:3642518
 5:01 am on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Q: How do you spell Canada?

A: C AY? N AY? D AY?

Like in, "It's a good day, ay?" "Nice car, ay?" "Let's hit the pub after work, ay?"

poster_boy




msg:3642535
 5:43 am on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Said dismissively: "I could care less".

...so bold that your lack of care isn't yet at it's minimum levels...

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:3642578
 7:54 am on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Another Glasgow trait is overuse of the phrase "by the way."

"I saw you last night, by the way."
"What time is it, by the way."
"I'm going to the game tomorrow, by the way."

This can be annoying but it can also be quite funny to listen to a conversation ;iberally peppered with this when the participants don't even realise they are doing it.

"Pegged it" has always meant "died" here in Scotland too. I always took it to have its roots in the game of cribbage, a once popular pub card game. When you peg out in cribbage you are finished - the game is over, etc. Perhaps I am wrong?

rj87uk




msg:3642726
 11:38 am on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

This is one I don't hate but rather like!

Ken.

You ken whit a mean?
Means:
You Know what I mean?

You ken?
You know?

I love it! It's from east of Scotland mostly.

MatthewHSE




msg:3642817
 1:31 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

I've always thought the term "pegged it" meant you got something exactly right.

That's what I always thought too. As in, you nailed it, you pegged it, absolutely, I agree, nodding head, etc.

When a husband or wife says "we're pregnant". That is like nails on a chalkboard to me.

Umm...what else would you say? The child belongs to both of them after all...

sem4u




msg:3642829
 1:45 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Cool = great
Bad = good
Sad = rubbish
Innit = isn't it or something...

ectect




msg:3642856
 2:11 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Pegged it is definitely passing away, legged it would be running away.

vincevincevince




msg:3642867
 2:24 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Umm...what else would you say? The child belongs to both of them after all...

The child may belong to them both, but pregnancy is a medical condition of being impregnated and so can only be true about the woman.

Syzygy




msg:3642878
 2:45 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

My bad

That one gets me every time.

What the hell is "my bad"? My bad what - my bad back?

"Am I bad?"is bad enough, but "my bad" should be banned.

Jane_Doe




msg:3642992
 4:01 pm on May 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Umm...what else would you say? The child belongs to both of them after all...

So do you also say things like:

Our period is late this month.

I wish we could get rid of these cramps.

These heels are really killing our feet.

Our water just broke.

The wife is pregnant. The husband is not. I take it you like this phrase. So by all means don't let me stop you from using it. Just be aware that people like me will smile politely at the news and then mentally file your face and name and place them in the same storage area of our brains where we put people who drive under the speed limit or leave their Christmas lights up until July.

This 64 message thread spans 3 pages: 64 ( [1] 2 3 > >
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