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Rounding up
I give them $5 for the $4.95 item, and get a "thank you" as change
Laker




msg:3486752
 12:02 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

Over the past several weeks I've noticed a change ... well, a lack of change actually.

It's been going on for a long time with pennies ... I might not have a penny or two, or the vendor is out of pennies -- the "Take a Penny - Have a Penny" tray has become an advertising fixture at many retail locations ... and so, absent the penny-tray, either I, or the vendor would take the "loss".

Now I've noticed this practice has inflated to nickels and dimes. Several times over the past few months, I've not received the nickel or dime due in change -- and, more often than not, without a word spoken about it from the vendor.

There are those merchants who do "round down", returning $2.00 from a ten dollar bill for an $8.20 purchase ... but they are the exception.

Anyone else experiencing this silent price increase?

What's the maximum "rounding up" you would tolerate before speaking up? (Or is everyone using VISA for all purchases?)

[Sorry for the somewhat US-centric topic -- albeit it does (I think) include Australia, Canada, and New Zealand]

 

sonjay




msg:3486799
 1:06 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I would not and do not allow the merchant to "round up" unilaterally. As the person to whom the change is due, it's my option to round up if I so choose, but it's not the merchant's right to round up and not give me my change.

And yes, occasionally I do round up on my own, simply telling the merchant "thanks" and leaving without waiting for my change. But that's my choice, not his.

Just like it's the merchant's option to "round down" -- e.g., charging me $2 on a $2.02 purchase. I don't get to make that decision, the merchant does.

In other words, each of us is permitted to be as cavalier as we wish about our own small change, but we don't get to be cavalier with someone else's small change, no matter how small.

thecoalman




msg:3486892
 3:35 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

Agree with the poster above, should be the decision of whoever is losing the change.

Those pennies add up though. I saved them for about 5 years and ended up with $100 .Personally I think the penny should be abolished, it's pretty much useless.

vincevincevince




msg:3486894
 3:43 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I don't know the law in the USA, but if it happened in the UK I'd be filing a police report as it is illegal to indicate a price for goods which is lower than the price you are willing to accept for them. So far as I'm concerned we're better off with this kind of person out of business.

If you are unwilling to give a penny change, then put a nice round price on your item. It might be a small sum of money; but as thecoalman said it adds up.

Habtom




msg:3486922
 5:22 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

Despite being a big city, where I live, people tend to give you chewing gums as a change.

Go Dubai, Go :)

[edited by: Habtom at 5:22 am (utc) on Oct. 25, 2007]

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:3486960
 7:06 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I don't like chewing gum. ;)

Habtom




msg:3486990
 7:59 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I don't like chewing gum. ;)

I do like sugar free chewing gum. But that is more expensive, less likely you will get it instead of your changes. What I don't know yet is if I can collect all the chewing gum and exchange it later on for something else.

I know the answer already, but I will ask. No harm, right?

Old_Honky




msg:3487134
 11:09 am on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

It is sort of happening in the UK also.

When the change is less than 10p and I am still waiting for it the staff at some of the local shops look at me like I am some sort of saddo, then make a big thing about handing me the money.

I disagree with the practice because if they keep even 5p from each customer they are making an extra £5 - £10 per day through theft. If I want to give money to charity I will put it in the bloody box myself thank you very much! And it will be a lot more than 5 bloody pence!

The answer is to keep a pocket full of change and always give them the right money, or give them the odd amount so they can give you whole fivers and/or £coins as change from your 10 or 20.

wheel




msg:3487170
 12:11 pm on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

The answer is to keep a pocket full of change and always give them the right money, or give them the odd amount so they can give you whole fivers and/or £coins as change from your 10 or 20.

At my local coffee shop, this type of behavior is rewarded with long, blank looks at the change in their hand.

topr8




msg:3487177
 12:21 pm on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

it is standard policy for me to say

"do you want your pennies"

when i'm giving change to retail customers now ... usually they say no and thus don't get them.

we are in the uk and sell mostly to tourists who do not want a whole load of coppers in their purses

ps. i regularily have to give back money after customers overpay for items - i think because they don't understand the currency ... though it seems simple enough to me :)

draggar




msg:3487183
 12:29 pm on Oct 25, 2007 (gmt 0)

I do like sugar free chewing gum. But that is more expensive, less likely you will get it instead of your changes. What I don't know yet is if I can collect all the chewing gum and exchange it later on for something else.

You'll never know, someone traded a large paper clip and worked his way up to a house. :)

ps. i regularily have to give back money after customers overpay for items - i think because they don't understand the currency ... though it seems simple enough to me :)

Don't people realize that money is money? Even though the currency is different between the US, UK, Canada, and several other countries, it's the same. 100 cents (or whatever they call it) in one dollar / pound or whatever. I guess they just don't know how to count money in general (which is probabaly why Brain Age 2 has a training on giving change?).

Whenever I visit a foreign country I try to make sure I understand how the money system works that way I know I won't be blatantly ripped off (I'll be ripped off by higher "taxes": and inflated prices :) ).

teylyn




msg:3487951
 1:23 am on Oct 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

Here in New Zealand they introduced new coins last year. At the same time they got rid of any coins smaller than 10 cents. Things still cost $0.59 or $9.95, so all cash purchases are now rounded up or down to the nearest ten cents. If you pay with a card, though, you'll still get charged to the cent.

But now there's a lot less clutter in my wallet!

teylyn

mcavic




msg:3488031
 3:49 am on Oct 26, 2007 (gmt 0)

all cash purchases are now rounded up or down to the nearest ten cents. If you pay with a card, though, you'll still get charged to the cent

Very nice.

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