homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 54.166.255.168
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member

Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: incrediBILL & lawman

Foo Forum

    
Naming Words They Got Right: "Morning Glory"
Names of "Things" They Almost Got Right
Webwork

WebmasterWorld Administrator webwork us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 3:00 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

"Morning Glory" - The name just nails its subject.

I was outside this morning, looking at the morning glories in their full morning glory - wide, deep blue and white, trumpet shaped flowers, facing the sun - all joined together on a vine that climbs across a wooden swingset I built 20 years ago. The vine transforms the swingset's clunky, angular "built to remain durable under heavy use" 4x4 and 4x6 framework into a bit of backyard art.

Morning Glories. Glorious.

What other "naming words" just nail it?

"Butterfly" - Flutterby would have been perfect.

Names they just plain got wrong? "Door"?

 

Matt Probert

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 3:51 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Cop - Old Teutonic for a spider. How appropriate it should now refer to a policeman!

Cobweb - That should be copweb (see cop above).

Matt

[edited by: Matt_Probert at 3:52 pm (utc) on Sep. 30, 2007]

lawman

WebmasterWorld Administrator lawman us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 4:12 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>Cop - Old Teutonic for a spider. How appropriate it should now refer to a policeman!

Looked up "cop etymology". Didn't see any mention of German origins.

I always liked "jackanapes". Just the sound of it fits its definition perfectly. :)

King_Fisher

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 7:02 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I always thought Cop was a British abbreviation for " Constable on patrol"..KF

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 7:25 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Is "bad breath" really bad? Would "no breath" be an improvement?

jecasc

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 8:42 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I was outside this morning, looking at the morning glories in their full morning glory

I must admit it took me a moment until I realized you were using the term "morning glory" in its botanical meaning. I only knew the term - as Wikipedia puts it - "common slang for Nocturnal penile tumescence in men"

Marshall

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 9:43 pm on Sep 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I always thought Cop was a British abbreviation for " Constable on patrol"..KF

It is.

Guess what <snip> gets you ;) *

Marshall

* Origin is British from l o n g ago.

[edited by: Marshall at 9:44 pm (utc) on Sep. 30, 2007]

[edited by: lawman at 11:03 pm (utc) on Sep. 30, 2007]

Webwork

WebmasterWorld Administrator webwork us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 1:40 am on Oct 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

common slang for . . tumescence

I'm ruined! The bloom is off the . . morning glories. I shall never look at them again with such . . innocence! ;-)

digitalghost

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 3:14 pm on Oct 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>What other "naming words" just nail it?

Sunflower. Spike. Nice spiky sound to match the shape of a spike. Rainbow. Melody is particularly melodious, as is well, melodious.

>>Cop

More likely from capere, or maybe a reference to copper badges but least likely is the acronym, they weren't used much before the 20th century. Cob is also the oldest Germanic root I've ever been able to find, cop being a #*$!ization of that.

The snipped acronym is a clever story, but again, acronyms weren't used much before the 20th century, let alone way back when that particular word surfaced. Another acronym origin that is wrong is Ship High In Transit.

If the word was evident before the 19th century, you can be sure that an acronym isn't the root.

Hester

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 3:45 pm on Oct 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

I always thought "cop" came from "copper" (not sure why).

Marcia

WebmasterWorld Senior Member marcia us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 4:01 pm on Oct 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>I always thought "cop" came from "copper" (not sure why).

Kids in So. Calif. used to yell out the car windows at the cops, "Old pennies!" meaning dirty copper.

poster_boy

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 8:19 am on Oct 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>What other "naming words" just nail it?

Torque. Bladder. Sunglasses.

timster

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 7:50 pm on Oct 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

Is it too obvious?

The Web.

Western

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 10:28 pm on Oct 3, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>got right
controversy

Lipik

10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 12:38 pm on Oct 4, 2007 (gmt 0)

I heard "Cop" was short for "Copper", and this copper was a link to the copper buttons on their long jackets (in the old times).

Cop as in spider :

In Dutch we use the word "spin" for spider, but in dialect we also use the older word "spinnekop".
The last part of this word kop (or cop) refers to the word kop wich means "head". As a spider in fact looks like a giant head with feet...

[edited by: Lipik at 12:39 pm (utc) on Oct. 4, 2007]

httpwebwitch

WebmasterWorld Administrator httpwebwitch us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 5:55 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

tissue (the sound of a sneeze)

digitalghost

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 6:20 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

If we're just talking about onomatopoeic words there are a slew of them.

Rattle. Quack. Meow. Buzz. Whoosh. Hush. Boom. Every schoolchild should be familiar with Poe's The Bells and why a vocal spat can be referred to as a 'rhubarb'.

Then you have other languages, Bengali birds that go, coohoo'koohoo and Finnish birds that go tsirp tsirp while Norwegian birds go, kvirrevitt. Afrikaans bees go zoem-zoem and Korean cows go um-muuuu.

A snoring Arab sounds like karkara but a snoring Kiribati is ringongo.

The Tulu of India have a bunch of words to describe different splashes;

Gulum for a stone falling into a well, gulugulu for filling a pitcher with water, caracara for water coming from a pump, budubudu for bubbling water, gushing water is jalabala, salasala for pouring water and calacala for the sound of children wading through water.

King_Fisher

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 6:52 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

Chug-a-lug. Downing a beer in one long gulp...KF

Bubba..A southern gentleman with questionable intelligence...

[edited by: King_Fisher at 6:55 pm (utc) on Oct. 5, 2007]

King_Fisher

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 7:09 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

A few more;

Shot gun

Watermelon

Fruit cake

Nutmeg...(no reflection on our esteem fellow poster)...KF

bettye51

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 7:15 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

horseback

digitalghost

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 8:07 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

Don't forget Whippoorwill.

lawman

WebmasterWorld Administrator lawman us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 8:24 pm on Oct 5, 2007 (gmt 0)

KF,

Shotgun house makes sense if you've ever seen one. :)

King_Fisher

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 6:00 am on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

Lawman, Yep know what you mean, Also called mill houses(sawmill or cotton mill)

Being an educated Bubba you probably know what a house is that has a

"dog trot" breeze way...KF

digitalghost

WebmasterWorld Senior Member digitalghost us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3465180 posted 6:40 am on Oct 6, 2007 (gmt 0)

I know a Bubba that has a Ph.D. He could laugh at all those dip#*$!s that own half an acre and a riding mower, but instead, he laughs at #*$!s that put themselves above Bubbas that own 30 to 300,000 acres and couldn't tell the difference between a goat and a sheep.

Oops.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved