homepage Welcome to WebmasterWorld Guest from 50.16.165.62
register, free tools, login, search, pro membership, help, library, announcements, recent posts, open posts,
Become a Pro Member

Visit PubCon.com
Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
Forum Library, Charter, Moderators: incrediBILL & lawman

Foo Forum

    
Working at home VS renting an office
vivalasvegas




msg:3325927
 7:15 am on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Lately I've been considering renting an apartment for my web marketing work. I currently work at home and sometimes find it so hard to actually do something:( So I'm thinking that separating work from being at home would help. What do you think? Has any of you done this and seen an improvement?

Thanks.

 

DamonHD




msg:3325988
 9:03 am on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

My experience over ~20 years is that spending money on an office does not help: the distractions are usually about you rather than the environment.

Clearly, if you need other employees/coworkers, then things are very different, but otherwise save yourself some money and work from home.

Rgds

Damon

Lexur




msg:3326047
 10:57 am on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Yes. I did it and rented a small office.

This way:
- I must to shave everyday
- I walk 10/15 min. twice
- I have office's neighborhood (who think I'm a Internet guru :)

Of course, it allowed to hire my first employee three years ago and now I have a bigger and better office.

Marcia




msg:3326053
 11:17 am on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

>>Clearly, if you need other employees/coworkers, then things are very different, but otherwise save yourself some money and work from home.

I once had a neighbor someplace I lived who had a phone sales business running out of his apartment. He had phones installed in one room, and had employees coming in to work. The setup was OK, there was a room right off the apartment entry door that was pretty much separate from the rest of the unit, so it was a perfect setup for him, without the overhead. But that's basically a relaxed type of biz environment, it might not work for all businesses.

I've also come across authors and screenwriters in So. Calif. (and some in NY do it, too), who work from home and have hired office personnel.

Self-discipline is from within, it doesn't depend on the surroundings. Being an un-self-disciplined person, I can speak from experience. IMHO the hardest part of working from home is having the discipline of setting a time schedule and walking away. That would be easier to do with an office, locking the door, going home, and leaving it behind for the day.

Key_Master




msg:3326095
 12:27 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

An office makes for a nice tax write off.

jpman




msg:3326127
 1:02 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I rented mine in Sep last year and would never look back. If you want to expand, its the only way to go.

pageoneresults




msg:3326156
 1:21 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Its all a state of mind! I work from home and have been for the last 10+ years. I'll work on the patio. In the yard. While doing laundry. While preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner.

I'll take my laptop and work down at the beach, or the lake. Or, I might even kick back on the couch and bring my wireless keyboard and do some work while viewing the 46.0 flat panel.

Offices are too, too, officey. ")

I'm putting less mileage on the vehicle. Under 500 miles per month. Just bought an electric bike to get around locally, no need to burn gas at $3.50 a gallon.

Philosopher




msg:3326161
 1:27 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I'm in the same position. I've been working from home since I started working on the net about 9 years ago.

In the beginning, I enjoyed working from home because of the freedom to work when I wanted...no commute, etc.

Now, I have a wife and 4 children and it's quickly becoming and issue.

Without realizing it, the wife tends to take advantage of the fact that I'm here by asking me to do things she wouldn't if I had a normal job...things like watch the baby for an hour while she runs some errands, expecting me to be able to pick the kids up from school if she's running late, etc.

On top of that, the baby is a daddy's girl and constantly wants to come in and "help" me. I love her to death, but she makes it difficult to get into a groove.

Yes, part of it has to do with your state of mind, but in some circumstances, it is a bit more complicated and an office makes good sense.

I would imagine I'll have an office within the next 2 months as I don't see me being able to survive another summer (holy cr*p...that's only 1 month away!)

[edited by: Philosopher at 1:30 pm (utc) on April 30, 2007]

wyweb




msg:3326170
 1:38 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

An office makes for a nice tax write off.

You've got that right!

pageoneresults




msg:3326174
 1:43 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Within the next few years, we're going to see a whole new generation of corporate workers who are working from home. With energy costs on the rise, we the people have to do something to help with those issues. Working from home is one answer.

Here in California, it may take you 1-2 hours to get to and from work on any given day. The congestion on the roads here is horrendous to say the least. That 1-2 hours could easily be traveled in 15-30 minutes without traffic. Who the hell wants to spend 2-4 hours in traffic everyday? Not me, I've been there, done that and it sucks! Not only is there wear and tear on the vehicle, but the wear and tear on the mind, body and soul is far greater.

For many of us, there is no need to waste 3-4 hours everyday getting ready for, traveling to and traveling from an office. Why do it? Imagine how much more productive you can be by taking those wasted 3-4 hours and adding them to your life. ;)

[edited by: encyclo at 2:41 pm (utc) on April 30, 2007]
[edit reason] fixed typo [/edit]

pageoneresults




msg:3326176
 1:44 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

An office makes for a nice tax write off.

So does a designated room within the house. You can also write off a percentage of the utilities. I have 144 sf of office space within the house that is written off.

There really is no need to purchase office space unless you absolutely need to. Its so, so, 90s!

DamonHD




msg:3326232
 2:29 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

A tax write-off is simply not paying taxes on money you spent needlessly and now don't have! Carts and horses...

We're fairly clear that when I'm at home working, much as though it is lovely to see my toddler daughter frequently throughout the day, we basically pretend that I'm physically not here, so that anything that I couldn't do if I were in an office, I don't do. (Though I do pop downstairs for a quick family mealtime, for example.) Else I would go elsewhere and 'hot desk' in a virtual office.

I have the company pay all the household electricity since the servers use 90%+ of the entire bill and the company pays nothing for heat&light. When I rented an older bigger place (and did have employees work in), I had the company pay part of the rent roughly in proportion to floorspace used.

Real savings, and acceptable to the tax people too.

Rgds

Damon

vivalasvegas




msg:3326712
 8:58 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Thanks for your input. I'm still not sure what I wanna do and I guess I won't until I try it. The irony is that I live alone so I don't really need to work some place else as I'm not disturbed by anyone. In fact this may actually be the problem - too much silence and boredom. The best solution would probably be to expand, hire people, etc.

nutsandbolts




msg:3326714
 9:02 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I have worked from home for years and I hate it now.... Recently I have been using local coffee shops with my laptop getting much more work done. Ideally, I would like a shared office.

I can see why offices were created in the first place.... leave work at work... and enjoy home time at home, away from blasted computers!

LifeinAsia




msg:3326717
 9:12 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

An office makes for a nice tax write off.

Personally, I'd rather have the money for the full amount rather than the tax savings on the spent amount.

(Simple example: $10,000 in rent and a 25% tax bracket. You pay $10K and get a $2,500 write-off. So it only "costs" you $7,500. But if you don't spend it in the first place, you're $7,500 ahead of the game!)

And, assuming you do things correctly, you can write off a portion of your house/apartment as a home office.

Jane_Doe




msg:3326722
 9:21 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

If you have the money, there can be some nice tax advantages to owning the building where you have your office.

Personally, unless I wanted to buy an office buidling as an investment, I would never get an office just for myself. I'd only get an office if I had enough employees or so many distractions where working from home wasn't feasible.

Over ten years think about how much money you would have if you had invested the equivalent of rent payments instead in a no-load index fund.

If you are bored at home it might be cheaper to get a pet or two to keep you company or join some clubs.

pageoneresults




msg:3326778
 10:25 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

I can see why offices were created in the first place.... leave work at work... and enjoy home time at home, away from blasted computers!

Ah, I have a different philosophy now that I've worked from home for so many years.

Why not blend the two?

What's wrong with splitting the day up a bit? Work a few hours, play a few hours. Work a few more, play a few more? You see, that's what nice about working from home (in certain industries), there are no fixed hours. You make your own hours.

Think about how Google has their campuses set up. They combine both work and fun into one environment. You too can do that from home. You just need to build that environment to your liking while still being the efficient machine that you are. ;)

Rehan




msg:3326817
 10:50 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Without realizing it, the wife tends to take advantage of the fact that I'm here by asking me to do things she wouldn't if I had a normal job...things like watch the baby for an hour while she runs some errands, expecting me to be able to pick the kids up from school if she's running late, etc.

On top of that, the baby is a daddy's girl and constantly wants to come in and "help" me. I love her to death, but she makes it difficult to get into a groove.


I know exactly what you mean... I think I have 3 daddy's girls / "helpers", though. :-) I think I work 9PM to 5AM (after they're all in bed) more often than I work 9AM to 5PM!

But I don't mind at all right now. One of the reasons I choose to work from home is so I can be around and help out. They're this young only once.

vivalasvegas: There are some "coworking" virtual offices that have been popping up in a few cities. That may give you the work-oriented social environment you're looking for. Go to <snip> for more info on that.

[edited by: lawman at 3:48 pm (utc) on May 1, 2007]
[edit reason] No URLs Please - Linked Or Otherwise [/edit]

travelin cat




msg:3326837
 11:12 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

A tax write-off is simply not paying taxes on money you spent needlessly and now don't have!

I beg to differ :)

Tax write-offs allows you to take advantage of being self employed. You have expenses that you can use to reduce your taxable income. You're going to pay them anyway (not needlessly) so why not deduct them?

My home office allows me to write off not only a portion of my mortgage interest, but portions of my utilities and insurance. Also I can write off my car (at least the percentage I claim is for work), the gas and insurance for my car (same) and many other "creative" things that are for my business, like some travel, meals and entertainment.

None of these things were spent needlessly, they are legitimate expenses that I am taking advantage of. They have been time tested and have survived two IRS audits.

Needless to say...I vote for home office, but with no kids, thats easy for me to say.

Jane_Doe




msg:3326841
 11:22 pm on Apr 30, 2007 (gmt 0)

Its all a state of mind! I work from home and have been for the last 10+ years. I'll work on the patio. In the yard. While doing laundry. While preparing breakfast, lunch and dinner.

When my kids were little I'd get some of my best work done at the park or the play yard at McDonalds where they would stay occupied for hours on end.

Without realizing it, the wife tends to take advantage of the fact that I'm here by asking me to do things she wouldn't if I had a normal job...things like watch the baby for an hour while she runs some errands, expecting me to be able to pick the kids up from school if she's running late, etc.

Hehe, just a thought, but a lot of moms work full time at home businesses and take care of the kids themselves. Having a spouse to take care of the kids full time and just being asked to pitch in an hour here and there would seem like a dream job to a lot of work at home moms.

[edited by: Jane_Doe at 11:28 pm (utc) on April 30, 2007]

woop01




msg:3326998
 2:44 am on May 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't this thread come up every Spring?

I know I caught myself posting in a similar thread twice. I've finally resigned myself to the fact that I'll never have a water cooler again.

lawman




msg:3327519
 3:50 pm on May 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

Jerry: So, we're going to make the post office pay for my new stereo, now?"

Kramer: "It's a write off for them."

Jerry: "How is it a write off?"

Kramer: "They just write it off."

Jerry: "Write it off what?"

Kramer: "Jerry, all these big companies, they write off everything."

Jerry: "You don't even know what a write off is."

Kramer: "Do you?"

Jerry: "No, I don't!"

Kramer: "Well, they do. And they're the ones writing it off."

Jerry: "I wish I could have the last twenty seconds of my life back."

Crush




msg:3327588
 4:52 pm on May 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

The guy asking is single. If you sleep alone then the last thing you would want to do is be at home alone. Maybe it is good for you to get out.

I have been at home since Novemeber and love it. We have offices all over Europe, so I found I was walking 500 meters to the office only to co ordinate work via messenger etc in other countries. Personally I hate the office interruptions, lighting, distractions, Rigid work hours to name a few.

Jane_Doe




msg:3327606
 5:14 pm on May 1, 2007 (gmt 0)

The guy asking is single. If you sleep alone then the last thing you would want to do is be at home alone. Maybe it is good for you to get out.

Still it is a lot cheaper to go to the gym, take your lap top to the park, do volunteer work and join some hobby clubs than rent an office you don't really need.

vivalasvegas




msg:3328477
 12:32 pm on May 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Jerry: So, we're going to make the post office pay for my new stereo, now?"
Kramer: "It's a write off for them."

Jerry: "How is it a write off?"

Kramer: "They just write it off."

Jerry: "Write it off what?"

Kramer: "Jerry, all these big companies, they write off everything."

Jerry: "You don't even know what a write off is."

Kramer: "Do you?"

Jerry: "No, I don't!"

Kramer: "Well, they do. And they're the ones writing it off."

Jerry: "I wish I could have the last twenty seconds of my life back."

:)) I think this is one of the top 5 funniest discussions between Jerry and Cosmo.

The guy asking is single. If you sleep alone then the last thing you would want to do is be at home alone. Maybe it is good for you to get out.

I couldn't have said it better. This is definitely what my problem is.

Still it is a lot cheaper to go to the gym, take your lap top to the park, do volunteer work and join some hobby clubs than rent an office you don't really need.

These are good suggestions thanks. I do go to the gym but that's just an hour or two a day. The volunteer work idea sounds great.

luckychucky




msg:3328624
 2:38 pm on May 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

IF you're psychologically built for maintaining decent enough structure & self-discipline to keep your eyes on your goals, and portion out your time enough to make sure tasks get done, working at home is wonderful.

I bring a 'unit of work' to completion, then goof with the cat, then start on the next task. I water the garden. I hit a favorite blog for a minute or two, see what's new. I make a cup of tea, have a snack. Each break is only a few minutes but it profoundly refreshes the mind and helps keep lightness and creativity alive. All this leisurely activity combined still uses up way less time than a to/fro commute.

My office has its own room and - wonder of wonders - a door. The door can even close. Wow. I can work in whatever beat-up tShirt I slept in (if I feel like it). No alarm clock but I still manage to get up decently early, when ready and refreshed, not prematurely yanked from slumber by a heinous buzzer (so I can leave in time to beat the traffic?) with a sleeploss hangover ruining the rest of the day. And believe you me, I'm way productive. Efficient, too.

And boy howdy do I get to keep a lot of extra money I would otherwise have sent down the drain.

Reading some of the comments above, it brought to mind those slaves after the Civil War who were free to go, yet chose to stay on the plantations nonetheless, because it was the only world they knew. Or maybe that scene in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest where McMurphy discovers that most of the 'lifer' mental hospital patients are incarcerated on voluntary status, and technically could have simply walked out years ago.

I once read that if you require a quiet room in which to meditate, then the room is doing the meditation for you. Apparently some of us miss the buzzing fluorescents, the stale air, the cubicles, the grey deadness of office space. Maybe some people just need an office, need a tie around your necks like a noose to feel that their worklife is truly real? It's like the freedom and potential in self-employment is just too much. You're like an artist facing a blank canvas.

As for human companionship, sunlight and air: as someone suggested earlier, join the Sierra Club, go for a hike. Hang out in a cafe now and then. Hit on chicks. Take a class, get a hobby, get a life. Explore the world. If the work environment is your customary sole source of social interaction, you can do better.

LifeinAsia




msg:3328651
 3:17 pm on May 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

As for human companionship, sunlight and air: as someone suggested earlier, join the Sierra Club, go for a hike. Hang out in a cafe now and then. Hit on chicks. Take a class, get a hobby, get a life. Explore the world. If the work environment is your customary sole source of social interaction, you can do better.

Not sure why no one has suggested the obvious before now- PUBCON!

There are also lots of other more frequent interaction/networking opportunities- your local Chamber of Commerce, local networking clubs (usually meet for breakfast or lunch once a week and share leads), Toastmasters, lots of technical/business organizations, etc.

[edited by: LifeinAsia at 3:19 pm (utc) on May 2, 2007]

woop01




msg:3328660
 3:26 pm on May 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

Unfortunately Pubcon is only a few times a year. At the last Pubcon we were trying to figure out how to get local groups of people together for something similar. I realize there's no 'vig' in it for WW but it would be nice to have some kind of matching system for that.

Jane_Doe




msg:3328673
 3:31 pm on May 2, 2007 (gmt 0)

For me, when I stopped working in an office I found the best places to meet people were clubs or fun type classes that had group activities. If you go to the gym or take an academic class, you can meet lots of people but many are there not to socialize but are there for a specific purpose, like to get fit or get a degree.

But with hobby or interest groups you tend to meet other people with the same interests who are looking to socialize as well.

Global Options:
 top home search open messages active posts  
 

Home / Forums Index / Local / Foo
rss feed

All trademarks and copyrights held by respective owners. Member comments are owned by the poster.
Home ¦ Free Tools ¦ Terms of Service ¦ Privacy Policy ¦ Report Problem ¦ About ¦ Library ¦ Newsletter
WebmasterWorld is a Developer Shed Community owned by Jim Boykin.
© Webmaster World 1996-2014 all rights reserved