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Does having a high SERP, pagerank, Alexa rank really increase sales?
olimits7

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 8:40 pm on Jun 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

Hi,

I've doing a lot research on all the different SEO methods, but after all is said & done and you reach a good level of high SERP, pagerank, Alexa rank does it really help increase sales over time?

I know Alexa and pageranks always fluctuate and are probably not the best tools to judge a website, but it does give you an idea of how the website is doing in terms or rank.

I've seen websites with a high Alexa traffic rank and PR sell a lot less than a website with a low Alexa traffic rank and PR.

Could the reason for the lower ranked websites outselling other high ranked websites be that more weight is given to other advertising methods like PPC campaigns or affiliate programs instead of having a high SERP or rank?

Thank you,

olimits7

 

buckworks

WebmasterWorld Administrator buckworks us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 9:01 pm on Jun 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

One major difference would be what kind of traffic the site is attracting. A site that draws traffic looking for jokes or recipes would be less valuable than a site which had traffic seeking to buy expensive widgets.

The ultimate measure that determines a website's value is not PR or Alexa or even traffic, but rather, how much money it is putting in the owner's pocket

HugeNerd

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 9:25 pm on Jun 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

buckworks, I think you misunderstood olimits7. If I am reading this correctly, olimits7 is suggesting that PR and Alexa are undervaluing websites significantly in that some sites with high PR and Alexa rankings are being vastly outsold by comparably invisible sites.

olimits7, my first thought is that the low-ranking, high-order-volume sites must be investing in PPC, email campaigns, social networking advertising, etc to overcome their lack of exposure in other areas. Or, though I imagine you would have noticed this already, they have really great pricing and are members of shopping comparison organizations and invest heavily in them. That way, the other sites with the high PR and Alexa that get all the traffic provide the customer with information. The customer then does some price shopping...and ends up at the otherwise invisible site to make their purchase, meaning the "undervalued" sites have a high conversion rate.

Note: I almost completely ignore Alexa and PR. I consider a site to be "high ranking" if I hear people on public transportation or in bars talking about it like it's wardrobe malfunctioned in the middle of the Super Bowl while it was taking steroids with Pres. Obama and Susan Boyle. Until it gets that level of word-of-mouth publicity, everything else is arbitrary and subjective.

olimits7

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 10:18 pm on Jun 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

HugeNerd, that's exactly what I'm suggesting...

I think having good website visibility/branding is very important to how successful your site will be.

I see 2 major ways to get website visiblity:
1. Either getting placed high in SERPs for your keywords, link building, high page ranks, etc...
2. Or being involved in PPC, email campaigns, affiliate programs, etc...

So the question I've been asking myself is which way is better? And I guess it comes down to having a mix of both methods to reach a good level of visibilty.

I feel once people know about the site and it's a brand name like hearing McDonald's, Subway, Target, etc...then good pricing, easy website navigation, easy chekout process, etc... come to play.

But if you have this great website with low prices, and nobody knows about it then you will never get a chance to sell your competitively priced products to the public.

olimits7

rachel123

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 10:49 pm on Jun 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

which way is better

Well - if you absolutely positively had to choose between the two strategies (IMO you can do both - why not?)...

provided you can write html and understand the search engine self-help documentation, one way is free and the other is not. Organic traffic from high SERP is free today, free tomorrow, but takes time to accomplish. PPC costs you today, costs you tomorrow. If you need immediate gratification and have money to blow, PPC can give you that. So, do you have time, or do you have money? If you have neither, do you have some good beer?

Personally when I search I use organic results. Other people go for the ads. In terms of what your customers prefer - well that's dependent on your niche and market, I suppose.

That said, there is absolutely no reason why a webmaster can't work to develop high organic SERP while also engaging in email marketing and PPC (when ROI justifies it). I get quality (buying) traffic from all of these sources.

lower ranked websites outselling other high ranked websites
I have found, in general, that traffic quality is pretty consistent. It is up to the site to convert on the traffic they get. A well-designed new/low-ranked site may outsell a poorly-designed ancient high-ranked site. But there are a host of other factors involved, not to mention what the purpose and goals are for the site owners. For sites that run Adsense or other affiliate programs, traffic itself = money.

Bottom line, don't see this like a fork in the road...I can't think of a good reason to have to choose between different approaches when they can compliment each other so well.

olimits7 is suggesting that PR and Alexa are undervaluing websites significantly in that some sites with high PR and Alexa rankings are being vastly outsold by comparably invisible sites

I think you are misunderstanding the point of PR. It's not designed to track ecommerce sales numbers or conversions. It's designed to rank pages according to relevance to a certain query. Although it's hard for us ecommerce people to remember, there's a whole internet out there that includes sites whose goal isn't to sell you something. In that sense, Alexa traffic ranking doesn't undervalue high $$ sites - it isn't even interested in $$. If I get more visitors than you, I have a higher traffic ranking. What I do with those visitors, is up to me. :)

Does having a high SERP, pagerank, Alexa rank really increase sales?

Can your website convert traffic to sales? If so, then yes. Having high SERP will increase sales.

HRoth

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 4:44 pm on Jun 7, 2009 (gmt 0)

IME, a site that has lower page rank than mine and is lower in the SERPS and Alexa can indeed outsell me by quite a good deal. I think this is due to three things.

My competitors have way more products. I have 500. They have over 10,000. One thing I learned from Martha Stewart--people like to be presented with a lot of choices, even if they have no intention of selecting any of the vast majority of them. It is the idea of abundance. I am not interested, though, in being forced to have a building just to store inventory.

They focus on the Wally World effect--competing on the basis of price. Lots of people like lots of cheap stuff.

My site has a lot more info. I know that many of my visitors come to read and not buy. My competitors provide very little if anything in the way of content. Their customers are not interested in reading or else they already did it at my site.:)

I suspect we are also attracting a different sort of customer altogether, even though we are in the same niche.

So just based on my own experience, I would say that having high rankings in the SERPs, good pagerank, and high ranking in Alexa is not by any means the escalator to wealth. But then, it depends on how you define "wealth."

HugeNerd

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 3926785 posted 10:27 pm on Jun 8, 2009 (gmt 0)

My site has a lot more info. I know that many of my visitors come to read and not buy. My competitors provide very little if anything in the way of content. Their customers are not interested in reading or else they already did it at my site.:)

Great point; I suffer from this phenomenon as well. I get TONS of traffic which is clearly "window shopping" my descriptions before they go to their local big-box store and buy from someone with absolutely zero product knowledge. Unfortunately, people love the internet because it gives them nearly free access to almost unlimited information...which they can use to make decisions about what to purchase from someone else.

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