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Fraud Protection on International Credit Cards
Fraud protection internet orders
Lightguy1




msg:3825473
 5:57 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

What methods is everyone using to have "some" security on accepting international credit cards?

My current processor will not validate the cvv or address.

It appears there are other companies that strictly check for fraud. Such as, precharge, merchant alarm, fraud smack, geodetector...

Does anyone have any experience with these?

I always try to encourage wire transfer, but on small orders I would like to be able to accept international credit cards, with some security in mind.

Any help is appreciated!

Thanks

 

LifeinAsia




msg:3825494
 6:21 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

I use "reality checking."

minor red flag: all lowercase letters for name, address

minor red flag: free e-mail address that doesn't match customer's name (e.g., John Smith using bobjones@hotmail.com)

minor red flag: free e-mail address that doesn't sound natural (e.g., werty8236@yahoo.com)

big red flag: IP address from Africa, Russia or other former Communist block countries, or other suspicious countries

big red flag: African nationality with U.S. billing address

big red flag: actually, ANY African nationality for that matter (although haven't had many problems so far from Egypt & South Africa)

Other people can probably add some to the list.

Also, you should really read the prior discussions regarding wire transfers- they are not as safe as you might think.

[edited by: LifeinAsia at 6:21 pm (utc) on Jan. 13, 2009]

Lightguy1




msg:3825500
 6:26 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

I have contacted my bank president about wire transfers. He told me in writing that I am safe with the wire transfers. Before any transfer is made I have to be called at this one special phone number and I have to tell them a special password and id number. The other threat is someone taking my routing number and account number, however my bank has informed me I am protected as well.

LifeinAsia




msg:3825507
 6:33 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

Huh? I was talking about RECEIVING wire transfers, not OUTGOING wire transfers.

Lightguy1




msg:3825511
 6:37 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

Where is the risk in RECEIVING wire transfers, not OUTGOING. The only risk I could see is if someone uses a stolen account to wire me money. However, once I have the money, its mine and I am not wiring it back once I shipped items.

LifeinAsia




msg:3825517
 6:43 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

However, once I have the money, its mine and I am not wiring it back once I shipped items.

Again, please read the previous discussions regarding wire transfers- it is NOT that cut & dried.

If you receive stolen money, it is NOT yours to keep. Most likely, the money's real owner (and/or the owner's bank and/or the local police) will be contacting your bank and the money will be taken out of your account with or without your consent.

Lightguy1




msg:3825542
 7:15 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

Really? I doubt The local Nigerian police department is going to come to the states and get their money? Dont think so. In addition, whenever I nail someone for fraud in the US, I ALWAYS call the local police department in that area and inform them. Guess how many times the local police go to follow up? NEVER cause they dont care.

They can go through many international legal loopholes to try and get their money back. If they succeed than they deserve to get it back.

LifeinAsia




msg:3825559
 7:30 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

It's not going to be a Nigerian bank that a Nigerian fraudster uses. It's most likely going to be a major U.S. or European bank.

Remember that wire fraud comes under the domain of the FBI (and probably Interpol for international wire fraud). The local police probably won't do much about a $200 fraud one of your customers commits. But it's a completely different story with the FBI/Interpol (especially since most likely you weren't the only one scammed, so the amount of damages could be thousands of dollars or more).

Anyway, you asked for help in protecting against fraud. I can't force you to accept the help offered.

Lightguy1




msg:3825562
 7:33 pm on Jan 13, 2009 (gmt 0)

Thanks for the help LifeinAsia. I appreciate it, it is just difficult to get a grasp on what is right cause alot of people each tell you something different.

I agree with you on the wire fraud from a US bank or European bank that the FBI would be involved. The only time I will accept wires would be from foreign banks. If I ever take a wire domestically, it is from a repeat customer who make large purchases.

Thanks again for the info and I agree that "reality checking" is really the one secure step.

Glitzer




msg:3826239
 4:45 pm on Jan 14, 2009 (gmt 0)

Another red flag - international expedited shipping.

Lightguy1




msg:3826270
 5:11 pm on Jan 14, 2009 (gmt 0)

Glitzer, I agree, but sometimes a real customer will want the item rushed. The first time I did business with this company in Dubai I was nervous. It was a 3K order on a CC, with rushed shipping. I verified everything, it was going to a company. So I shipped it. We ended up doing weekly business now with this company and have never had a problem.

BUT, there has probably been about 20 attempted fraud that I have caught this year. First time customer, small dollar amount, rushed shipping.

lorax




msg:3826645
 1:31 am on Jan 15, 2009 (gmt 0)

>> We ended up doing weekly business now

Common sense says that if the destination is in a questionable neighborhood do your homework or be willing to take the loss. Sooner or later you will make a mistake. But when it pans out as your business deal did, it's icing on the cake and you have a new avenue into a market that you didn't have before. The problems arise when business owners go enter one of these deals without realizing the risk and potential losses. You did and it turned out in your favor. Kudos to you!

thorsten iceland




msg:3827079
 2:28 pm on Jan 15, 2009 (gmt 0)

LifeinAsia wrote:
Again, please read the previous discussions regarding wire transfers- it is NOT that cut & dried.

Lightguy1, it is as LifeInAsia says.

You may find these threads revealing; here [webmasterworld.com], and here [webmasterworld.com], and here [webmasterworld.com].

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