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UPS Delivered a Neighbor's Package by Mistake to My House
From an Adult Store
Jane_Doe




msg:3679955
 12:18 am on Jun 21, 2008 (gmt 0)

UPS wouldn't come to pick it up without me reading them the tracking number and giving them my personal information like it was a scheduled pick up. They said they would have someone call to arrange for pickup on Monday.

I said how about I just give them my address, they call the driver on his cell phone and and he picks it up in the bushes at my house where he dropped it off? But they said no, they couldn't possibly do that.

Why should I have to read them a 20+ digit tracking number, give them any personal information other than my address where they left the package by mistake, and wait at home on Monday for a scheduled pickup?

The UPS customer service person asked me if I knew the neighbors, like I'm supposed to go deliver a package with an adult store return address to some parents I vaguely remember from Boy Scouts and then try to make small talk at the door before I leave.

Anyway, just some food for thought before you ship by UPS next time. They clearly don't have a convenient process in place to encourage people to report misdelivered packages.

Or if your customers complain of packages not being delivered, consider the possibility that they were delivered to the wrong house and the residents didn't want to go through the hassle UPS tried to put them through of getting it to the correct address.

 

Jane_Doe




msg:3687875
 5:37 pm on Jul 1, 2008 (gmt 0)

But when did we get to the point where human error is intolerable, when it must be condemned by all as symbolic of some great lack, when a simple favor becomes a huge imposition that must not be borne? Geez.

That's great if you don't mind delivering your neighbor's package to them, adult content or not. But what you as an individual, someone sensitive to the importance of accurate package delivery, is not really the point of the post.

Would you do the same if the misdelivery were in a different zip code, a different city or a different state? If not, would you take off work to stay home and wait for a driver pickup so you could hand deliver a package left in your bushes? (Wouldn't it be easiest if you could just leave the package for pickup in the bushes where you found it?)

You personally might not have any problem taking any of the above actions, and if so, good for you. But my point is many people, like the ones who don't vote, sign proxy statements, have wills prepared or the ones in the recent news video who didn't bother to stop to help the person lying in the street after being hit by a car, would just chuck the package instead. When designing a business process, the most effective systems usually occur when the process is as easy to use as possible and requires the least amount of effort on the part of the user.

corbing




msg:3687917
 6:23 pm on Jul 1, 2008 (gmt 0)

Wow. What a thread. Here are two easy solutions for you next time Jane.

They clearly don't have a convenient process in place to encourage people to report misdelivered packages.

A quick google search of "ups pickup schedule" returns the first result as:

https://wwwapps.ups.com/pickup/schedule?loc=en_US

There, you are done. No waiting around. No being late for your appointment. No in person delivery to the perverts.

Or, simply stop by any of the many mailbox stores you drive by each and every day. Put the package on their counter and tell them to give it back to UPS - it was misdelivered. Done.

HRoth




msg:3687921
 6:27 pm on Jul 1, 2008 (gmt 0)

I don't do a lot of those things you mentioned, so I don't know if they are so indicative of a person who would just chuck the package.:)

I did mention that I would tell UPS they had to come get it when I was there, but if I did not work at home and the delivery address was not nearby, I would give it to the UPS driver who did the pickups at work.

However, I just called UPS and asked them what they would do in the situation of me getting a package and it not being addressed to me. They said I would not have to be there if I "didn't want to bother with it," in their words; I could just leave it outside and they would pick it up.

Jane_Doe




msg:3687945
 6:57 pm on Jul 1, 2008 (gmt 0)

Okay, neither of the last two posts don't change the fact that based on what I was told, I suspect a lot of people who don't normally ship packages through UPS would just chuck the package instead of coming up with alternative solutions on their own not suggested to them by UPS, and this still may provide some insight as to why some customers may report packages missing that are shown as delivered.

ispy




msg:3688117
 12:41 am on Jul 2, 2008 (gmt 0)

Since the contents of the package were specifically mentioned perhaps there is more to the issue then it just being misplaced package.

With throwing it on the porch as an option, are you more reluctant to deliver the package because it is porn then if it were just another package?

If so, then there is a moral issue at stake.

Jane_Doe




msg:3688207
 6:49 am on Jul 2, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you search for terms like UPS + complaints or UPS + missing package you'll find no shortage of search returns. So anyway, I made the post just to share my recent insights on why packages may end up missing, and based on online consumer complaints, it does seem to be a fairly common problem.

corbing




msg:3689133
 3:58 am on Jul 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

If you search for terms like UPS + complaints or UPS + missing package you'll find no shortage of search returns.

Jane, do you have a solution and/or suggestion that you are ready to offer? The searches for UPS + complaints or UPS + missing package appear to be about the same as if you used "fedex", "usps", or "dhl" instead of "ups". For that matter, ANY and EVERY large company in the USA probably has about the same number of complaints and upset customers.

I am not trying to make excuses for UPS. I am just pointing out that your negative opinion about UPS appears to be formed because they didn't do EXACTLY what YOU thought they should do in that situation. I'm sure that you (and I) can find fault in the policies and procedures of every Fortune 500 company in America.

If you have a suggestion that you would like to offer - either for an alternative shipper or for a way to change big company corporate America, I'm all ears.

BTW, just out of curiosity, I called FedEx to report a mis-delivered package today. The very first thing they asked for was a tracking number. I told them that was too inconvenient and hung up. And now I feel bad for wasting her/their time.

Jane_Doe




msg:3689527
 3:26 pm on Jul 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

corbing, every point in your last post has already been addressed within the thread, including post #:3683622 where I wrote four times that I read them the tracking number, and buckworks post #:3682485 where she noted "The OP was not objecting to reading a tracking number nearly as much as she was objecting to all of the other demands the company was making."

Jane, do you have a solution and/or suggestion that you are ready to offer?

My point isn't to change UPS or suggest people not ship with them. I don't know if the other carriers are any better. We have a high misdelivery rate on our regular USPS mail, but since they come to our house every day we just leave the mail out with a note and it is no hassle to us.

The point was that I've noticed that merchants at WebmasterWorld and other forums from time to time complain about customers who say they didn't receive their packages yet the packages show as delivered, and sometimes the merchants assume the customers are deadbeats. My suggestion was that "if your customers complain of packages not being delivered, consider the possibility that they were delivered to the wrong house and the residents didn't want to go through the hassle UPS tried to put them through of getting it to the correct address."

BTW, After I told them that I would not stay home on Monday to wait for a pick up at a time convenient only to them (when their driver was in the area), but that I would leave the package out and they could pick it up whenever they wanted to, then someone called back the same Friday afternoon. She was very nice, thanked me for reporting the missing package and said she had contracted the driver and he would be back to pick it up that Friday afternoon (which is what they could have done all along.)

[edited by: Jane_Doe at 3:30 pm (utc) on July 3, 2008]

Jane_Doe




msg:3689650
 4:37 pm on Jul 3, 2008 (gmt 0)

Correction: I meant to type:

BTW, After I told them that I would not stay home on Monday to wait for a pick up at a time convenient only to them (when their driver was in the area), but that I would leave the package out on Monday and they could pick it up whenever they wanted to, then someone called back the same Friday afternoon.

Philip_M




msg:3691613
 3:06 pm on Jul 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

"And no, I am not defending these big companies. I don't care about them any more than they care about me. But when did we get to the point where human error is intolerable, when it must be condemned by all as symbolic of some great lack, when a simple favor becomes a huge imposition that must not be borne? Geez."

Here, here! I am amazed that the OP can spend so much time and effort whining about how badly she is treated, when she could have simply acted as a normal human being and delivered the package to the neighbour herself. Why does she care whether it is porn - she does not have to look at it herself. It is none of her business. In any case, I thought that porn was always delivered "under plain wrapper" or with an unrevealing return address "XYZ Enterprises" or whatever, not "Filthy Movies Inc."

I sense that the OP is one of those insecure people who is automatically combative and regards almost anything as a slight, deliberately aimed at her. I cannot see why she feels that UPS have not handled the situation properly, except of course for delivering the package to the wrong address in the first place. If the delivery guy had the OP's education and intelligence, then he would not be working as a delivery guy - or perhaps he was a new start, not familiar with the area. Why do you want to make such a mammoth issue out of a simple delivery error?

[edited by: Philip_M at 3:22 pm (utc) on July 6, 2008]

turbosaab




msg:3691664
 5:39 pm on Jul 6, 2008 (gmt 0)

Jane, great post. I agree, it should have been as simple as calling them up and giving them your address.

Frankly, I'm amazed at how many posters not only missed the whole point but decided to write personal attacks...

Philip_M




msg:3691973
 7:26 am on Jul 7, 2008 (gmt 0)

In my experience there are three possible reactions by a person who has received a wrongly delivered parcel:

1) Steal it themselves or throw it away. I would say that 0.5% fall into this category, but of course still a large number absolutely even if small in relation to the number of parcels carried. Obviously not all customers who claim that they have not received their goods are rogues.

2) Anger at the people who cause this intolerable inconvenience. Attitude is "You have put me to trouble, so I will make things hard for you in return" by unwillingness to cooperate by (e.g.) refusing to report tracking numbers, raising objections to collection arrangements, making a prune mouth about the contents to justify their approach and so on. Perhaps 20% (a lot in absolute numbers) of people fall into this category.

3) Those who recognise that we all make mistakes at times, and are prepared to deal with the situation with tolerance and good humour. They recognise that in an imperfect world once in a blue moon their own parcel will go missing, and expect the person who wrongly received it to behave in a civilised manner and make an effort to arrange for it to be returned to them, even if that involves a little inconvenience. I believe that 80% of people will fall into this group.

I think that there are echoes here of traders' complaints and stories about customers who reject goods for silly reasons, refuse to return goods in the proper manner, and generally make difficulties on the ground that any shortfall from perfection, however slight, is to be condemned and if possible punished.

Jane_Doe




msg:3692166
 1:37 pm on Jul 7, 2008 (gmt 0)

In my experience there are three possible reactions by a person who has received a wrongly delivered parcel

If you think this post is about one person's experience instead of an apparent lack of a standardized business process by a large corporate entity to handle what must be a fairly routine transaction, then you have not understood the main point of the thread and are getting yourself all worked up in a lather for no reason.

Philip_M




msg:3692220
 2:30 pm on Jul 7, 2008 (gmt 0)

Early on (second post in fact), you said "Anyway, someone a little more action oriented from UPS called me back later today. She apologized for the inconvenience and said they would in fact call the delivery person and he would pick the package up from my house where he delivered it by accident. "

What more do you want? That she commits hari-kari?

If your gripe is that the call centre operative you first spoke to did not handle this correctly, well, again these people are not always the very brightest and best either. And she may have been quite new to the job and thus inexperienced as well.

It was a simple and not too damaging mistake. To err is human, to forgive divine. So drop it now.

[edited by: Philip_M at 2:36 pm (utc) on July 7, 2008]

quiet_man




msg:3692229
 2:37 pm on Jul 7, 2008 (gmt 0)

Frankly, I'm amazed at how many posters not only missed the whole point but decided to write personal attacks...

x2

I read the first page of this thread a week or so ago and thought that any confusion about the purpose of the original post and the main issue at stake had been dealt with by Jane_Doe's patient rebuffals and detailed exposition. But to see it carry on for another week and with increasing antipathy towards the OP makes me wonder what sort of agenda is at play here? I don't know how Jane_Doe, or the mods who tried to help, could make it any clearer. Folks, its not about bashing people for having a less-than-neighbourly attitude. Its not about bashing a corporation. Its about something that - rightly, wrongly, and regardless of where any blame may lie - is happening thousands of times every day and may well happen to your ecommerce shipment. Thank you Jane_Doe for raising this issue and for offering a possible explanation for some of the many cases we hear about on these boards about customers disputing delivery.

HRoth




msg:3692822
 2:37 am on Jul 8, 2008 (gmt 0)

I think you mean we disagreed with her, no?

Philip_M




msg:3692976
 6:58 am on Jul 8, 2008 (gmt 0)

If the only point was to reveal that very occasionally UPS (and doubtless other carriers) deliver to the wrong address, well, I think we knew that already.

lorax




msg:3693225
 1:56 pm on Jul 8, 2008 (gmt 0)

This thread has run it's course folks. Thanks.

This 48 message thread spans 2 pages: < < 48 ( 1 [2]
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