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my first webshop -- is reselling a good idea?
i can't really afford nothing else
kyrre




msg:3380497
 6:20 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

hey wassup people, thank you all so much for allowing me to register and become part of this great survival forum. i'm about to launch my very first webshop and i'm very excited.

but i'm a poor #*$! though. i can't afford buying wholesale, at least not yet. so i'm thinking maybe i should start by reselling. assuming i've found a nice niche, would this be a good idea? can i make a living from it? what are the pros and cons?

i don't know much about the art of reselling. but what i wanna do is to create a webshop better looking and easier to use than the other webshops in my niche, and then contact all of those webshops and see if i can resell their products for a certain commission. and then ofcourse requesting high resolution photographs of their products so i can brand them better.

i'd really appreciate some advice.

i'm just a poor young buck with dreams.

thanks,
kyrre

--

to save your precious time, i've made this post signature free :D

 

rocknbil




msg:3380584
 8:28 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

i don't know much about the art of reselling. but what i wanna do is to create a webshop better looking and easier to use than the other webshops in my niche

Welcome aboard kyrre, but your comment there is a little contradictory. How can you make a better webshop than those in your niche if you don't know much about it?

The key to success on the web is like anything else, writing, teaching, trade: do what you know. I suggest you work a little more on preparation so you do know about your topic, it will generate more interest and is more likely to succeed.

jpman




msg:3380592
 8:36 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

I know someone how buys stuff off me, sells it for a lot more than I do and the competition but he is the master of his trade. Its a very niche market and he buys stuff off me because he cant come to my country every time he needs something.

kyrre




msg:3380653
 9:13 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

Welcome aboard kyrre, but your comment there is a little contradictory. How can you make a better webshop than those in your niche if you don't know much about it?

thank you for your reply man!

well, i know how to design webshops and make them look good and all. actually i've worked for one for quite some time. but this webshop bought wholesale. what i don't know much about are alternatives to buying wholesale -- like reselling on behalf of other retailers, so i don't have to buy, ship, handle etc.

what are the rules? what's the best software to handle this kind of thing? anybody with experience?

if it turns out this way of doing business earns me ten times less than buying wholesale i might reconsider.

thanks,
kyrre

kyrre




msg:3380732
 11:55 pm on Jun 27, 2007 (gmt 0)

i imagine i'd have to create some sort of affiliate retailers functionality to my webshop, that lets me add new retailers and their products and that automatically notifies them upon new orders and sends them their cash after i've taken my commission.

jsinger




msg:3380799
 2:15 am on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

i wanna do is to create a webshop better looking and easier to use

A year ago some site developer here wisely posted that every newbie tells him the same thing when they enter a crowded segment.

Often search engines hate gorgeous, highly graphic sites. Most sites nowadays are similar in ease of use. Many successful commerce sites aren't especially attractive or a snap to use. eg. Amazon

That approach will get you no where.

rocknbil




msg:3380817
 2:35 am on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

^ ^ ^ To put that another way, or maybe just another angle,

well, i know how to design webshops and make them look good and all

It's not the presentation that sells the stuff. It's . . . well . . . the stuff, and how easy it is to buy it. The importance of visual design can be argued endlessly, but when it gets down to it, it's the content that keeps your customers and compells them to buy. This is why I said, learn your product, make yourself an expert on it, and you will succeed.

jsinger




msg:3380837
 3:14 am on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

Is there anything better looking about Wal-Mart stores?

Their prime focus has always been on buying products cheaply and getting them on the shelves efficiently.

Note too that they don't buy from other retailers. :)

derekwong28




msg:3380841
 3:19 am on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

It seems what you mean by reselling is acutally "dropshipping" i.e. you ask the supplier to ship to the customer directly.

This is an extremely good idea for newbies. You do not have to carry any stock for a start. The only downside is that you pay more for the products. Another problem is that the dropshipper may put his instead of your shop's name on the parcel (you have to be careful about this). Arguments may also arise when the parcel is lost, or the customer returns the product.

I only use one dropshipper for our shop but would really have preferred to have all our products dropshipped. You should search for the terms "dropship" or "dropshipping" in Google. There are a number of good directories of dropshippers available.

kyrre




msg:3380968
 8:42 am on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

jsinger:

yeah you're right, but not only do search engines hate overly fancy or cluttered sites, people do too (even if their conscious minds aren't aware of it). thank you for your concern! but i've put all that fancy crap behind me, nowadays being more focused on designs that work -- simple, information- and function-oriented, that sort of stuff. bluefly, nordstrom, amazon, all beautiful sites! god bless jakob nielsen too!

derekwong28:

thanks a lot man, dropshipping is exactly what i'm trying to do! yeah, it sounds like a safe method to start out with. less work too.

about them putting their shop names on the parcels, do you think shops will agree not to put any contact information there? the name of their shop itself is ok i guess, i can just be honest about that on the product pages (i.e. from Shop or something), as well as sending them some of my own bumper stickers for them to slap on all orders coming from me.

may i take a look at your shop btw?

thanks man,
kyrre

Essex_boy




msg:3381487
 8:27 pm on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

This is a technique I use,my payment processor pays out on a Monday every Monday.

I find a supplier that allows me to buy in small amounts the Jewellery trade is a perfect example, I post on my website saying that we post orders twice a week.

In general I have the money before I buy the item and ship it.

It takes a lot of work to find someone whose reliable with sending out their orders to you, but it can be done.

Failing that get a credit card and find a supplier who takes them, or build a site and get a part time job and use that money just for buying stock with.

henry0




msg:3381597
 10:58 pm on Jun 28, 2007 (gmt 0)

All of the above is very important and well said
BUT
1) Are you able to project a strong brand (your web, collaterals, content, mail etc...)
2) What are the services offered (asides e-comm)
3) Have you defined/analyzed your clientele base
4) Do you know how to reach them
5) Why will they come back
6) Do you know what your competitors do well (very important) and poorly

If you have those ducks in row then go for it!

derekwong28




msg:3381772
 4:31 am on Jun 29, 2007 (gmt 0)

Suppliers serious about drop-shipping will put your shop's name on the parcel instead of their name. Some may even create a logo and chop for you free of charge. But each supplier will have different rules with regards to drop-shipping. It is essential to have a supplier with whom you can work with confortably.

I cannot post urls here and will pm you.

iFixSolutions




msg:3391051
 10:41 pm on Jul 10, 2007 (gmt 0)

but i'm a poor #*$! though. i can't afford buying wholesale, at least not yet. so i'm thinking maybe i should start by reselling. assuming i've found a nice niche, would this be a good idea? can i make a living from it? what are the pros and cons?

i don't know much about the art of reselling. but what i wanna do is to create a webshop better looking and easier to use than the other webshops in my niche, and then contact all of those webshops and see if i can resell their products for a certain commission.

it really sounds like you'd be much better off doing affiliate marketing rather than ecommerce. it's pretty much what you just described. i'd head over to that forum and see if affiliate marketing doesn't give you an itch. seems a lot of people have it these days. :) good luck

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