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Factors Worth Considering When Selling or Buying an Aged Domain / Website
Kickedout




msg:4478902
 11:07 pm on Jul 25, 2012 (gmt 0)

Someone wants to buy my domain which is in use and I have it since 10 years ago. Since I have adsense on it, I'm not really interested in selling. Because what they offer is less than I earn in 2 years probably.

So basically If I take offer I would be moving from my 10 years old domain to a new one, and I have to start over, not to mention it might take several years to rank again on Google, in the process I'll waste hours and have spoiled all my linking work. While I try to rank again I would be loosing adsense income.

The buyer says "There's nothing on the domain, however. The indexed pages in google don't resolve".

My understanding is:

1) A new domain name is by default sandboxed
2) It takes years (2 at least) to start ranking with same pages
I already have in a new domain
3) The links I got for my domain will be lost (it's a real pain to make all those change to the new one)
4) I'll be loosing Adsense income and can't really trust in I will recover that
5) I'll have to advise each costumer the new contact data

I'd really have to charge thousands of dollars just to avoid loosing money and to win money, perhaps we would be talking about more than USD 10.000 what is a lot of money just for a domain.

Do you agree?
Any tips?

 

BeeDeeDubbleU




msg:4478996
 7:29 am on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

You must charge what it is worth to you.

sem4u




msg:4479002
 7:59 am on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

I have bought domains for a company for more than $10,000 before. That is not a lot of money to some large companies. You need to ask for a bit more than it is worth to you in order to leave some room for negotiation.

HuskyPup




msg:4479096
 2:21 pm on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

Your assumption has several errors.

If you take an existing website on example.com and move it 100% to a new domain, say example.eu, retaining the exact same url structure and then 301 example.com to example.eu, within a few weeks GooYaBing will have re-spidered and will show the new urls with hardly missing a heartbeat.

I have done this several times without any problems nor loss in traffic and have re-used the orignal example.com for something else entirely within 3 months.

So:

1) A new domain name is by default sandboxed


Not in my experience, I've never had that in 18 years developing.

2) It takes years (2 at least) to start ranking with same pages
I already have in a new domain


Read my explanation above. From where did you get the 2 years idea? I can construct new sites on new domains and have them start ranking within weeks of being launched. For instance I have a 500 page site launched less than a year ago that ranks #1 for most keyword products and ALL keyword products are top 10.

3) The links I got for my domain will be lost (it's a real pain to make all those change to the new one)


This is the biggest pain IF you have a lot of backlinks. Initially when you launch example.eu and point example.com at it you WILL retain all your backlinks since nothing will have changed however when you transfer example.com those backlinks will disappear.

Therefore the questions are how many backlinks do you have and do they really send much traffic?

4) I'll be loosing Adsense income and can't really trust in I will recover that


Your existing AdSense income will more or less stay the same until example.com is transferred the question goes back to #3, realistically how many people click thru to your site from the backlinks.

5) I'll have to advise each costumer the new contact data


Not a problem if you already know all your customer contact details surely?

#6 You have not mentioned...think about all your passwords and YOUR important contact details without which you may not even be able to do many things.

$10,000 is not a lot for a domain, I had one name and the buyer initially bid $10K. When I explained to them the importance of the name to me, the many years of marketing used by the name and the amount of websites I would have to alter if I were to sell it, they slowly increased their bids to $100,000.

The more I analysed the volume of work involved with selling that domain, and all the things I would have to do, I actually told the buyer not to bother any more since it was going to take a least two or three people up to 6 months work and was something I was not prepared to go through.

It really will depend how big your site is and how much $10k is worth to you versus $5k from AdSense and moving to a new domain and the possible loss of traffic from your existing backlinks.

I feel the easy way forward for you is to check WMT if you it them to see how many backlink referrals you get or if you have a CPanel then using Awstats to check how many referral sites you have...you may be surprised how few!

HuskyPup




msg:4479159
 5:42 pm on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

Ooops, just noticed a typo:

I feel the easy way forward for you is to check WMT if you it them to see


Should read:

I feel the easy way forward for you is to check WMT if you use them to see

sundaridevi




msg:4479178
 6:47 pm on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

With respect to development issues, I agree with what has been said above. You don't necessarily have to wait 2 years to start making money with a new site.

More importantly, a dollar today is worth more than a dollar tomorrow. So there are two very important issues to consider.

- If you did get $10k today for selling your site, could you put it to use and get a decent return on investment from it? In other words, if you have other opportunities to build something that you aren't doing because you don't have the money. Will they be making more money in two years time than you are making today?

- The other very important factor is the web is changing fast. There's a good chance that you won't be making the same in two years that you are making now. As the market shifts to mobile access will you benefit or suffer from that?

I've been through this issue a lot of times. My main site gets an offer to buy it about once every two years. I always think that this is my cash cow it grows every year without doing much and that finances everything else I want to work on. I also don't think that anybody will pay what it's worth to me if I project the revenue forward 5 years or so. So far I've been right, but in the last two years I've had to spend more and more on development and marketing just to stay even.

Now the story is grow or die. So if all sites eventually face that question, do you have the capacity to grow (either cash in the bank or the ability to do what it takes on your own)? If you can't answer that question with 100% confidence, then you should cutback your future revenue estimates accordingly.

treeline




msg:4479235
 9:31 pm on Jul 26, 2012 (gmt 0)

I had a .org domain that I always meant to develop, but never quite got around to. Occasionally I tested new programs there privately. So there was nothing that would need to be moved. A non-profit approached me about selling it, and I told them it would take at least $10,000 to make me think about it. Over the next year they tried several lower offers which I just ignored. They eventually offered the $10,000.

If it's a good domain, and they really want it, they will pay what it's worth. I wouldn't lose money to sell it.

graeme_p




msg:4479360
 8:00 am on Jul 27, 2012 (gmt 0)

You are selling the domain but keeping the site?

It depends. Domain prices seem quite unpredictable. There are some general rules such as a premium on common words and short domain names (especially short dot com ones).

The buyer says "There's nothing on the domain, however. The indexed pages in google don't resolve".


Is that correct? What are your traffic sources? Can any easily be redirected to the new site? Will the new owner of your old site do something to inform visitors (perhaps including bots) of where your new site is?

What people pay for a website or a domain varies a LOT. I have got offers varying by a factor of 6 times between highest and lowest for the same site at the same time - and I have not got a bid from the buyer I think is likely to pay the most, nor have I contacted every possible buyer I can reach yet.

Kickedout




msg:4479466
 2:55 pm on Jul 27, 2012 (gmt 0)


If you take an existing website on example.com and move it 100% to a new domain, say example.eu, retaining the exact same url structure and then 301 example.com to example.eu, within a few weeks GooYaBing will have re-spidered and will show the new urls with hardly missing a heartbeat.

I have done this several times without any problems nor loss in traffic and have re-used the orignal example.com for something else entirely within 3 months.


I assume correctly when I say I'd need 3 months before selling, to put the 301 redirect and leave some time until the new domain is fully spidered?

Buyer wants it right now.


In case selling: how do I ensure to get the cash before giving away the domain? Can someone tell me the secure process to do so?

graeme_p




msg:4479497
 4:32 pm on Jul 27, 2012 (gmt 0)

Escrow. Most banks and some payment companies offer it. There are even services that offer escrow specially for selling domains, so you get the money when it is transferred without the seller having to confirm.

ZydoSEO




msg:4479590
 9:35 pm on Jul 27, 2012 (gmt 0)

If you want to make sure you get paid before giving them access then use a service like Escrow dot com. They are very reputable. The service is simple to use.

I have no clue what you make per year on the site with AdSense, but sounds to me like you really don't want to let it go. So ask for some astronomical amount. I see people buying domains for $100k, $400k, and more all the time. If they want it then they will pay. Worse case... they walk and you're left with a site that still makes you money.

You have to think of not only how much revenue you make from the site, but also all of the money and time you've spent getting it to where it is at over the last 10 years.

You don't owe those people anything. If you sell, you're doing them a favor and are being inconvenienced into having to rebuild a new site. So make them compensate you appropriately.

And BTW, if you sell them the domain and move all of that content over to a new site, you are NOT going to be able to 301 redirect the old URLs to the corresponding new domain's URLs. You'll be wasting your time trying. As soon as they gain access to the site after payment, the first thing they are going to do is point that domain's DNS at their hosting account somewhere else... and POOF... any 301s you had in place just prior to selling will disappear. So you WILL be starting from scratch with zero back links.

And I would read the contract VERY closely if there is one (depends on size of company purchasing). Larger companies buying domains will often require a contract to spell out that they not only are buying the domain, but also all of the content, in which case you won't be able to use it on your new domain.

HuskyPup




msg:4479788
 9:11 pm on Jul 28, 2012 (gmt 0)

I assume correctly when I say I'd need 3 months before selling, to put the 301 redirect and leave some time until the new domain is fully spidered?


GooYahBing are usually pretty quick and have things fully re-spidered within 4 weeks. 3 months is usually recommended if using a name for something else...I can't remember where I read that in G's guidelines some time ago.

Buyer wants it right now.


That WILL create a problem however if they're that desperate for the "name" I bet they'd wait...probably.

Are you sure they don't want the content as well?

Kickedout




msg:4480266
 7:13 pm on Jul 30, 2012 (gmt 0)

They didn't mention the content, since they are a well known brand and my content has no relationship with their core business.

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