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ICANN Approves Non Latin Domain Names
benevolent001

WebmasterWorld Senior Member 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 8:37 am on Oct 30, 2009 (gmt 0)


System: The following 2 messages were cut out of thread at: http://www.webmasterworld.com/domain_names/4013533.htm [webmasterworld.com] by engine - 10:36 am on Oct. 30, 2009 (utc +1)


The private body that oversees the basic design of the Internet voted Friday to allow Web addresses be expressed in characters other than those of the Roman alphabet, though the change will initially be limited to domains controlled by national governments.

The board of directors of Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or Icann, adopted the change at the end of its latest semi-annual international gathering. The decision climaxed six years of discussion and technical work.

But the change for at least a year or so will only apply to country-code top level domains those with endings like .us or .cn or .uk, for United States, China and United Kingdom, respectively that are controlled by governments.

WSJ [online.wsj.com]

[edited by: engine at 9:35 am (utc) on Oct. 30, 2009]
[edit reason] added quote [/edit]

 

dreamcatcher

WebmasterWorld Senior Member dreamcatcher us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 10+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 8:47 am on Oct 30, 2009 (gmt 0)

It has now been approved:
[news.bbc.co.uk...]

dc

HuskyPup



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 3:14 pm on Oct 30, 2009 (gmt 0)

Icann said it would accept the first applications for IDNs by 16 November, with the first up and running by "mid-2010".

It is likely the majority of early non-Latin net addresses to be approved will be in Chinese and Arabic script, followed by Russian.

Therefore if I require "mycompanyname" or trademark in some of these languages where will we be allowed to buy them?

But the change for at least a year or so will only apply to country-code top level domains those with endings like .us or .cn or .uk, for United States, China and United Kingdom, respectively that are controlled by governments.

Or am I running too fast before this thing is even ready to do anything?

What if, say a Russian business, could claim fair usage of "mycompanyname" in Russia?

I'm only posing a couple of questions that are flying around our offices, personally I'm not overly concerned from a business point of view since, the fact is, most international business, shipping, insurance, banking etc is already done in English, my own international widget trade has been English language focussed for a least 100 years I would say.

The reasons for ICANN doing this are commendable however, I'm guessing here, for many businesses this is surely not going to make any difference whatsoever.

Yes, I do appreciate that typing CocaCola.mandarin for the local market will have benefits for the local and national market however for the international market?

For national social networking sites I can see the advantages...are we moving towards the era of the two-tier Net, one for the public and one for business?

Interesting times ahead eh? :-)

piatkow

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 3:46 pm on Oct 30, 2009 (gmt 0)

Very relevant I think for all B2C sites. The site can be advertised in a script that the customer can read rather than making them try and understand this weird occidental stuff.


What if, say a Russian business, could claim fair usage of "mycompanyname" in Russia?

If they are entitled to use the name in Russia then they have more right to the .ru name than you do.

I used to run a site for an organisation in England that used an acronym also used by an organisation in Oregon. I don't think anybody in the USA had a problem with the .uk and none of my users ever mentioned a problem over the .com

HuskyPup



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 6:11 pm on Oct 30, 2009 (gmt 0)

If they are entitled to use the name in Russia then they have more right to the .ru name than you do.

Not for trademark holders though surely?

What if someone is searching for example.com and ends up on example.whateverlanguage who has copied my site ad verbatim?

What if that user is ripped off and then I receive a court injunction etc for something I haven't done?

Maybe Russia was the incorrect one to use since it is fairly easy to translate between characters, how about the many different Chinese or Indian characters?

Could it create a monster amount of phishing sites with sound-a-like names in local languages?

I really do hope they've thoroughly thought all this through.

One thing's for certain, the first big scam will have everyone saying "I told you so!"

nlldnadmin

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 7:08 am on Oct 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

Actually, I believe ICANN will layout a registration guideline for the new domains. Right now, we need to focus on less speculation, and wait or ask ICANN to specify the procedure to follow.

nlldnadmin

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 8:22 am on Oct 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

Moderators: dreamcatcher

Please approve below LINKS..

1) hundreds of BBC readers submit feedback to ICANN's approval.

[newsforums.bbc.co.uk...]

[edited by: Webwork at 5:35 pm (utc) on Oct. 31, 2009]
[edit reason] BBC = Authoritative, Other forums, blogs, etc. NOT authoritative = NO links please [/edit]

piatkow

WebmasterWorld Senior Member piatkow us a WebmasterWorld Top Contributor of All Time 5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 8:44 pm on Oct 31, 2009 (gmt 0)

If they are entitled to use the name in Russia then they have more right to the .ru name than you do.

Not for trademark holders though surely?

What if someone is searching for example.com and ends up on example.whateverlanguage who has copied my site ad verbatim?


Your were originally postulating a problem when they could claim "fair usage" NOT if they were passing off.

HuskyPup



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 4:18 pm on Nov 1, 2009 (gmt 0)

Your were originally postulating a problem when they could claim "fair usage" NOT if they were passing off.

I'm not getting into an hypothetical argument about this however the problem could possibly occur therefore, one would assume, that ICANN did discuss this possibility and if not, why not?

The fact is that we trade in China under our example.com, example.cn and example.asia names however we do know that there are Chinese companies in our trade using these names in Mandarin and obviously use as near as possible similar latin domain names for their websites such as example+keyword.com/cn/asia.

How or who is going to resolve this? We've not all got the financial resources of Apple v Apple or Budweiser v Budweiser.

Remember there were loads of disputes after the .eu launch fiasco therefore this could be even a bigger problem and, presumably, have to be fought on a country by country basis?

I suppose for companies with made-up names it will not be as big a problem as for those with generic dictionary names?

Yeoj

5+ Year Member



 
Msg#: 4016194 posted 12:04 pm on Nov 4, 2009 (gmt 0)

This is going to cause havoc with thousands of server side scripts that validate email address and domains based on latin text. Every validator is going to have to be rewritten.

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